Do Beauty Supplements Really Work?

There are 134 search results for “beauty supplements” on Sephora.com alone, I can’t even imagine what the growing number is these days besides just Sephora. Many of these companies take advantage of the fact that many peoples’ insecurities are based on thoughts that they don’t have clear skin, strong hair and nails, enough collagen, etc.

The descriptions are usually pretty similar across the board, the promise is:

“Formulated by doctors, these supplements help nourish, firm, brighten the skin, while combatting visible signs of aging like fine lines and pigmentation…” you get the drift.

In reality though, mostly all of them are NOT made by doctors (in fact doctors recommend against them), and the high price tag (leading you to believe that you’re getting wonderful ingredients that’ll work right away) is simply a rip-off! For example, Algenist is advertising their Chlorella and Spirulina lines at $65 for a small amount, when you can get these ingredients in a grocery store. And sure, they might mention that their is “ethically sourced” or some big claim that there is no way for you to verify.

Sure, some people claim to notice a difference, but more often than not, the difference is very minimal, like softer skin, brighter complexion, and thicker eyebrows, which can be achieved through a proper diet and a skincare routine anyway!

A huge factor to note is the Placebo Effect – when you believe you’re in fact getting those benefits, you’ll convince yourself that the supplement is working, and in turn keep repurchasing it. It only adds to the problem when the shape of the vitamins is a cute gummy bear, or an extremely-sugary pill.

Collagen supplements are one of the most popular ones: collagen is in everything nowadays, even topically applied collagen has made its way into the market. However, there’s still no research the supports the fact that ingesting or applying collagen to your face or body does anything. The only studied support for external collagen applies to any treatments you might be getting (laser, etc) and engaging collagen with it while the skin is repairing, but that’s it.

Not to mention that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) doesn’t regulate supplements the way it does drugs. So you never really know what you’re getting when you buy one of these products.

Granted, actual pharmacy vitamins, such as Calcium, Vitamin D, B, etc. can be helpful for individuals who lack the proper amounts of these in their systems and have been recommended by a doctor.

Beauty supplements are only a fraction of the supergiant supplement industry that also includes detox teas and dietary supplements, join pain relief, inflammation, redness, etc. Be on the lookout and be smarter than the constant promotional messages telling you “it’s the best thing for (your problem)”. Sometimes you don’t even think that you have that problem, until you’re being advertsised to and convinced of it!

References:
Video referenced
Everyday Health article
Huffington Post article
FDA website

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