12 Korean Beauty Trends To Try In 2021

Snail mucin. Bee venom. Glass skin. These are just some of the beauty trends to emerge from South Korea in the past five years. Whether you’ve dabbled in a bit of donkey milk (good for rejuvenating the skin with protein and fatty acids) or you’ve played it safe with a weekly face mask, K-beauty is everywhere. In fact, Allied Market Research says that by 2026, the K-beauty market will be worth an estimated $21 billion. According to Jenni Middleton, director of beauty at trend forecasting company WGSN, “During the coronavirus pandemic, consumers searched more for K-beauty, looking for innovative products to add to their lockdown beauty regimes.”

Like most cultural phenomena, K-beauty is ever-changing—what was big last year may not be as popular this year. As Middleton observes, we’re seeing the traditional 10-step routine give way to a more minimalist approach as conscious consumers react against fast fashion and excessive packaging. Elsewhere, playful gimmicks such as color-changing effects or jellylike substances are being passed over in favor of science-backed formulas.

1. Hanbang ingredients

Hanbang ingredients are traditional herbal ingredients used in Korean medicines and they’ve long been a staple in Korean life. For example, ginseng root, houttuynia cordata, sacred lotus, and rehmannia boast antiaging, anti-inflammation, and regenerative properties.

2. Acid layering

K-beauty has been incorporating more acid into its products, but with a gentle approach that focuses on striking the balance: Too much can irritate and aggravate your skin, too little will yield no results, so products with an optimal amount is key. Use the right balance of AHAs and BHAs (plant and animal-derived acids) to gently exfoliate dead skin cells and smooth skin texture.

3. Carrot seed oil

Carrot seed oil is an unsung hero at the moment, although it has been used in K-beauty for more than 10 years. It contains vitamin A and is a great antioxidant. It’s antiaging, antifungal, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory—so it’s ideal for anyone looking to brighten up their skin.

4. Gentle retinol

K-beauty’s ‘skin first’ approach will continue through 2021, especially given that self-care and skin care are so important right now. There’s no denying retinol’s powerful antiaging properties, but the K-beauty approach uses a lower percentage, so the skin stays healthier and less irritated. Retinol is highly efficacious without causing unnecessary damage.

5. Centella asiatica

[The year] 2021 is less about what’s ‘buzzy’ and more about what’s tried-and-true, with a focus on calming the skin. Centella asiatica [an herb grown in Asia, known for being anti-inflammatory]—or ‘cica’—is huge right now. With everyone dealing with the prolonged stress of the pandemic and dreaded ‘maskne,’ soothing irritated, angry skin seems to be at the forefront of people’s minds. Cica is the ingredient that everyone wants to add to their routine.

6. Clean beauty

More brands are developing products free of chemical additives, artificial ingredients, and fragrance. Products will be even more gentle with effective plant-based ingredients, and many brands are becoming vegan as well. Consumers are more aware of what they put on their skin.

7. Pre-, pro-, and postbiotics

This year, inner and outer wellness brands and products will gain more popularity. For example, brands that focus on pre-, pro-, and postbiotics; microbiome-friendly skin care; and consumable supplements, which benefit both the skin and the gut.

“K-beauty will shift more towards a holistic approach, linking skin care and internal health. I take probiotic supplements for my bouts of eczema and I love using K-beauty products with fermented ingredients. I regularly use 107—it uses aged [seven- and 10-year-old] vinegar [that promotes good gut health]. Their vinegar tastes delicious with honey!”

8. Flexible minimalism

A few years back, we were oversaturated with the ‘10-step Korean skin-care routine.’ The ‘skin-care diet’ [using fewer products and steps] that followed was a pushback against that, but it was too restrictive for those who wanted more results than could be attained with just the basics.

Flexible minimalism is a focus on clean and simple product lines, which makes customizing your routine easier. There will also be a push towards pared-back lists of ingredients. Single and minimal ingredients are appealing because of their simplicity and high concentration of the hero component.

9. At-home indulgences

Skin care has a functional element—it has to work and deliver results—but I expect products that provide meditative, soothing, and spa-like moments to take off in a big way. They can transport you mentally and emotionally to another headspace.

10. Hyphenate and hybrid skin care

We’ve started seeing ‘skipcare’ as a K-beauty trend, where the focus is on a pared-down, simple, and minimalist routine. We will be seeing more efficient and effective multitasking and versatile products—what we like to call ‘hyphenates’ or ‘hybrid’ skin care.

11. Skin detoxifying and barrier strengthening

“The belief that ‘skin is a reflection of your mental state’ comes from Korea, and growing up, my mother emphasized this to me many times. We’ll see more barrier-strengthening ingredients that boost immunity, such as mushrooms, plus detoxifying herbs including mugwort and ginger. Ceramides [which form a protective layer to help prevent moisture loss and visible skin damage] will make a comeback too.”

12. A boost in body care

In Korea, many body-care rituals originate from the bathhouse culture, where milk treatments are slathered on the face and body, and baths are steeped with skin-beneficial ingredients, such as green tea and probiotics. During a difficult year, personal self-care has taken on new importance for many, so we expect to see the definition to include all of the skin, from head to toe.

VOGUE article

Lisa Eldridge Has The Best Tip To Keep Your Lipstick From Smudging Under Your Face Mask And More…

When celebs like Dua Lipa, Alexa Chung, and Kate Winslet want makeup looks that will standout on the red carpet, they all turn to renowned makeup artist Lisa Eldridge.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #40 series on my blog.

But Eldridge’s influence doesn’t stop at her impressive client list. For over 20 years, she’s been the mastermind behind the makeup in the fashion campaigns of  brands like Gucci and Prada, wrote a best-selling book, and was one of the fist professional makeup artists to embrace YouTube, with a number of her tutorials going viral.

In-between applying makeup, Eldridge has worked with a number of top beauty brands on product development, including Chanel and Shiseido, to name a few. Currently, she’s the global creative director of Lancôme. (You can thank her for the game-changing bendable Grandiôse Liquid Eyeliner.)

After years of crafting hero products for other brands, Eldridge launched her namesake makeup line in 2018 with a single product: lipstick.

The velvet-inspired matte formulas quickly became cult-favorites, and Eldridge has recently launched nourishing, but high-pigment lip glosses, which sold out also immediately.

Here, Eldridge shares the inspiration behind her own lip products, her tips for preventing your lipstick from smudging under a face mask, and more.

At what point in your career did you know you wanted to start your own brand? 

I spent a long time working with labs and cosmetic scientists while consulting and developing for them. I really enjoyed doing it and all of the companies I was working with were very complimentary about how good I was with the scientists and putting everything all together. I had it in the back of my mind that I wanted to do it. However, I’m not a big planner and things usually happen organically for me, which is what happened with my lipsticks as well.

How did your experiences as a makeup artist shape your own brand? 

I think I’m well-placed as someone who does tutorials, but also does makeup every day on different faces and skin tones. My experience of handling makeup and seeing makeup in motion gives me a double side.

Why did you decide to launch with lipsticks? 

The funny thing about cosmetic science is that products can often take years to develop. While I have other things coming, some of which I’ve been working on for such a long time, the lipsticks just happened to be ready first. I had the idea to make this velvety lipstick, and we tried once before and it didn’t work. We finally found a way to get the lipsticks out of the mold and still look like velvet. It was a challenge, and I had to put a lot of quality control in place, with people checking every single bullet. I was 100% satisfied, so I was happy with launching it. Since it’s only me, I’m not under pressure to launch on a certain date or month, whether the product is ready or not, which is quite a luxury.

You recently came out with lip glosses. What was the inspiration behind this launch? 

While my matte lipstick formula isn’t drying, I wanted to do something that was more moisturizing. I had the idea of creating a product that feels like a lip treatment, but still offers a lot of color. We tried different formulas and we were happy with this one, along with the colors. Sometimes things come quite quickly, and other times things will take years. And by quickly, I mean within 18 months.

This year has been weird for wearing lipstick, among many other things. Where do you see lipstick trends going in the time of COVID-19? 

I planned to do lips again so I was a bit concerned about the face masks. But, lipstick has been just as popular as ever. There’s always that lipstick effect, which is a historically proven thing, where people like to cheer themselves up with a bold lip color. I thought people would stick to more natural colors, but my red shades have been super popular this year. Velvet Dragon, which is a new red shade, has just flown. A lot of people send me photos and videos showing me the lipstick they’re wearing under their masks. A lot of doctors and nurses wear my lipsticks. They show me they’re wearing a really bright red lipstick under all of their PPE. I think it’s like a secret thing that’s quite cheerful and brings a lot of joy.

What are your tips for preventing lipstick from getting on your face mask? 

Stick to thin layers. When you put thin layers on, the lipstick will bond in synergy with the skin. Sometimes if you put a lot on from the bullet, there’s a certain amount that’s sitting on top of the skin. I always say to start with a thin layer — maybe with a lip brush — so that it almost settles in the creases on the lip. Then, put another thin layer on top and tap it in with your finger or blot it with a tissue. You’ll still feel the creaminess on the surface, but you won’t have any excess product available to come off.

What is a common mistake people make when applying lipstick? 

The shape you make — especially with strong colors — is important unless you have completely balanced lips. For example, I have downturned lips, like a lot of people do, and if you follow your lips all the way down to the corners of the mouth, it tends to make you look miserable and sad. My tip is to roughly following your natural lips when you fill them in and just stand back and look into the mirror. Take a lip pencil and add a little bit of bulk or use a Q-tip to take a bit off one side, as needed. You’ll look like a different person. It’s a really subtle tweak, but you need to look at your lip shape and see what suits you.

Shop Lisa Eldridge’s Lip Products:

True Velvet Lip Colour in Velvet Ribbon

Inspired by a classic bow, this true neutral/blue red is highly pigmented with a matte finish that has a slight sheen to it. To sum it up: it’s a bold shine-free lipstick that won’t dry out your lips.

To shop: $35; lisaeldridge.com.

Velvet Myth Fantasy Florals Lip Kit

A rich berry is a gorgeous alternative to a red lip. This kit includes the True Velvet Lipstick, along with the coordinating Enhance and Define Beauty Liner, a creamy gel lip pencil, and Gloss Embrace Lip Gloss, a non-sticky formula that offers impressive color payoff while simultaneously nourishing the lips. The trio comes in a velvet floral pouch created by multimedia artist Jon Jacobson. It’s a great gift for the lipstick lover in your life, or you know, yourself.

To shop: $84; lisaeldridge.com.

Gloss Embrace Lip Gloss in Blush

This multitasking formula offers leaves lips smooth and soft, thanks to a blend of nourishing ingredients, while offering high-pigment color. Blush, along with the other five shades are currently sold out, but you can subscribe to Eldridge’s mailing list for restock alerts

To shop: $24; lisaeldridge.com.

The Blue Velvet Collection

What’s better than treating yourself to a single lipstick? Three new colors. This set comes with three blue-based shades of Eldridge’s True Velvet Lip Colour. There are also options available with warm undertones as well as bold and neutral.

To shop: $104; lisaeldridge.com.

INSTYLE article

3 Pretty Spring Beauty Trends From Bobbi Brown’s New Global Artistic Director

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #39 series on my blog.

There are few makeup bags that haven’t, at some point, been graced by a Bobbi Brown product. A brand that puts making women feel (as well as look) good at its core, 16th of January marked the 30th anniversary of its inception. To celebrate such a lengthy time in the beauty industry, the brand has, excitingly, appointed makeup artist Hannah Murray as global artistic director.

“Bobbi Brown is a brand I’ve loved since I started as a makeup artist,” Murray tells Vogue over the phone. “It’s such a well-loved global brand, and we have very similar philosophies regarding embracing natural beauty and individuality, as well as empowering women. These are things I’ve been championing for a while so it feels like a very natural fit.” Take a peek at Murray’s Instagram page, and you’ll see image after image of luminous skin, playful details around the eyes and bold brows on models and celebrities alike. Her makeup is real, fresh, and a far cry from the heavy contouring and airbrushed skin that have become popular in the last few years.

All of which makes her an excellent fit at a brand known for its feature-enhancing (rather than covering) products, where she will be overseeing everything from the fashion shows Bobbi Brown sponsors and campaigns, to education and product development. She has had experience with the latter before, having worked on the (rather brilliant) Topshop beauty line when it launched in 2011.

“I’m essentially going to be the visual voice of the brand, and I think with everything that’s been happening in the world, it’s a really pivotal moment to see things with fresh eyes and build on Bobbi Brown’s heritage,” she says. “I’ve lived in New York for the last 10 years, and before that in London, and I very much understand both the American aesthetic and the European sensibility and aesthetic too – it will be interesting to see that merge, something I think will give the brand a freshness, too.” When it comes to new products, we can expect some “innovation, excitement and fun”.

Though she isn’t, like many of us, forced to sit on Zoom all day, Murray is keenly aware of the “giving, giving, giving” that is endless, exhausting meetings, and believes in the power of beauty – whether that’s pampering your skin or applying some mascara – to uplift a mood. “There’s something ritualistic about [skincare and makeup]. Just like fresh air and eating well, having five to 10 minutes to yourself to cleanse, put a mask on, massage your skin is so healing. I have a three-year-old boy, so grabbing those moments is grounding. We all need to take care of ourselves and have a bit of me time.”

As for the beauty trends she expects to be big this year? Here she shares three of her key predictions.

Spa skin

“Instead of applying 10 products just to walk out of the door [like we used to], it’s now about feeding your skin and making it feel fresh and juicy and plump and alive. That’s a feeling thing, as well as being about how you look, and it’s using texture rather than product. You can layer on balms – I often dab Bobbi Brown’s gorgeous Lip Balm on cheekbones as it really makes skin look alive, like spa-fresh skin.”

“I’m hoping we’ve moved on from baking and cut creases – I want to see skin, feel it, and let it breathe. Another of my favourite products is the Bobbi Brown Extra Illuminating Moisture Balm, which is a lightweight moisturiser that imparts a subtle pearlescent finish for a “flawless, hyper-real skin effect”.

Outdoor glow

“I think everyone now wants to look healthy, like they’ve been outdoors and not stuck indoors for three months! I’m thinking the beauty of a real flushed cheek and freckles.” Try the brand’s Pot Rouge, a buttery-soft cream blush which melts into skin seamlessly for a natural finish.

’90s minimalism

“Take cues from the ’90s and apply eyeliner to your waterline to tight-line around the eye. It gives a bit of definition but it’s not laboured over. Makeup should do the work for you, you want to wear products that are smart, easy to use and that work well for you.”

VOGUE article

France Becomes The First EU Country To Bypass China’s Animal Testing

Cruelty-free brands are having a moment. New exemptions outlined in China’s latest Cosmetic Supervision and Administration Regulation update mean that certain products can now enter the country without undergoing animal testing on arrival. These “ordinary” or “general use” cosmetics include mascara, shampoo, and fragrances. 

France has become the first European country to qualify for these exonerations. The National Agency for the Safety of Medicines and Health Products (ANSM) has developed a dedicated platform in France to enable its manufacturers to obtain the necessary certificates and approvals for easier access to the mainland. Other EU countries are now racing to devise their own frameworks to meet the update and see their brands follow suit with easier access to China. 

China has agreed to drop its animal testing requirement for imported cosmetics as long as manufacturers can provide a certificate of conformity confirming that the product complies with various manufacturing and product safety standards.

The French health authorities have risen to the challenge and are now in a position to issue this document, ahead of their European equivalents.  

Animal testing is a contentious practice and has long proven a barrier to selling in China for EU companies. As Patrick O’Quin, FEBEA President explains,

“We are delighted with this progress, which rewards several years of efforts made with the Chinese authorities. The cosmetics sector is the only one to have completely banned animal testing in Europe, and we are happy to continue to develop regulations in other parts of the world. This agreement will also allow French cosmetic companies to export under new conditions to China. This country is today our second trading partner.”

COSMETICSBUSINESS article
JINGDAILY article
GLOBALCOSMETICSNEWS article

The Watercolour Makeup Trend Will Transform Your Winter Look

Looking at the makeup on the models walking the autumn/winter runways, you could have been forgiven for thinking that you were seeing a show from the wrong season. Pops of blue, flashes of orange and pink, dustings of yellow, green and lilac… the painterly palettes chosen by makeup artists backstage at shows such as Dries Van Noten, Gucci, Maison Margiela and Missoni were decidedly springlike. And so, too, was their application, which was as important as the spectrum of colour itself. Sheer watercolour washes gave the look a very accessible appeal.

Missoni autumn/winter 2020. 

“Transparency automatically makes colour more beautifying on the face,” explains Terry Barber, director of makeup artistry for MAC Cosmetics. “It takes away the fear of looking garish or retro, and it’s those fresh, plump washes of colour that allow you to be more playful.” Be it a halo around the eye, a new or unusual experimentation in lip colour, or a gentle tonal clash on both eyes and lips, using products in this way gives an end result that is much softer – and this is, according to Barber, the easiest and most flattering in-road to exploring technicolour choices. “Veils of colour that bring out the features rather than enclose them are the unsung heroes of makeup,” he says.

So what to make of this more romantic approach? “It’s a good time to break the seasonal rules and not resort to the classic earthiness of autumnal beauty,” says Barber. “Instead celebrate the colours of optimism and freshness. Can we say spring/summer is the new autumn/winter?” It’s a resounding yes.

Clinique Chubby Stick Shadow Tint in Big Blue

£18.50; available at LookFantastic

Glossier Lidstar in Lily

£15; available at Glossier

MAC Cosmetics Powder Kiss Liquid Lipcolour in Crossfade

£19; available at LookFantastic

Byredo Colour Stick in Ultramagnetic

£26; available at Selfridges

Chanel Rouge Coco Flash Lipstick in Freeze

£32; available at Selfridges

Dolce & Gabbana Solar Glow Universal Illuminating Drops

£38; available at Harrods

Charlotte Tilbury Cheek to Chic blush in Ecstasy

£30; available at Feel Unique

Lancôme Hypnôse Eyeshadow Palette in Bleu Hypnôtique

£42.50; available at LookFantastic

Dior Backstage Glow Face Palette in Rose Gold

£36; available at Selfridges

MAC Cosmetics Powder Kiss Soft Matte Eyeshadow in Ripened

£17.50; available at LookFantastic

VOGUE article

“Beauty Is For Everyone” Harris Reed’s MAC Cosmetics Collab Is Rethinking MakeUp

Just as Harris Reed’s clothing offers an important voice in the conversation around the way we define masculinity and gender identity in fashion, a limited-edition collaboration with MAC Cosmetics created by the 24-year-old British-American designer is set to redefine the way we approach makeup. 

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #37 series on my blog.

“Beauty is fluid, beauty is for everyone and I can’t wait to see how people are going to use this collection to show their version of self-expression and fluidity,” Harris told Vogue, practically shrieking down the phone with excitement. “That’s what I’m super excited about.”

“My first experiences with makeup were with my friends at a MAC store getting ready for prom and it was the brand that I first saw putting make-up on ‘boys’’, they explain, citing MAC as the perfect partner. “For it to even trust me, and take on my strong-ass message of fighting for fluidity, I have to say, has just felt like the most beautiful partnership.”

One of Harris’s personal highlights to come from the collaboration is that it will enable their hundreds of thousands of followers the opportunity to own their own part of the Harris Reed brand and feel included in its wider message. “It’s such an emotional thing for me. I’ve been so incredibly lucky that millions of people have seen the things I’ve worked on and have been a part of, but have maybe until now they’ve not been able to buy into it. This is now something that anyone can get their hands on and be a part of. It doesn’t feel real, it feels crazy.” 

The millennial-pink packaged collection is made up of four products, each of which offers a plethora of possibilities to play around with. A smudge of one shade into your hairline could work mixed with another swept over your eyelids for a trip to the shop – just as Harris did when creating the palettes. Though MAC has a history of being used by professionals, this collection has a level of tactility to it that the least acquainted with makeup can become quickly familiar with. The fact that there are no application brushes is deliberate – Harris prefers the human touch.

“It is very much about a playfulness and the joy of makeup,” Harris continues. “As someone who makes clothes that take a couple of weeks to produce, if I want to make a statement with makeup, it literally takes me seconds with a good lipstick or eyeshadow. As I have pushed this idea of a more fluid space in a more fluid world, I’ve really loved that makeup can always be that gorgeous icing on top. It doesn’t only complete the look but, it also completes the message, acting as that extra ounce of light to help radiate what I stand for.”

Much like their clothing, the inspiration behind the colours and products is a major meeting of eras and aesthetics, resulting in an overall “glam-luxe romanticism gone non-binary,” they say. “It is a mix between Studio 54 and rococo, but also think a full renaissance party. You can start with this very beautiful, very whimsical approach and then by the end you can end up with this Studio-54-inspired gold eyeshadow all over your face, even pushing up to the hairline.” Their hero product? A trio of lipsticks called ‘From Harris, With Love’ that reminds them of their first forays into makeup and looking at lipsticks with their mum as a child. “I know those are the ones that I will keep on me at a party, applying, applying and applying.”

Harris’s own approach to beauty and using makeup for themselves has shifted as their sense of self has grown — most notably after they started at Central Saint Martins, emerged in London’s creative scene. Yet they weren’t always so comfortable and forthcoming with using products for themselves. “Being around fabulously flamboyant people really pushed me in the way that I wanted to express myself in terms of my gender identity and being creative across so many areas,” they said.

“[Wearing makeup] has made me have a much more honest approach to my identity. Like anything, it can be scary if you’re not familiar with it. The minute I thought of makeup as a tool to use to send a message and spark a story, was when I started having a way more playful approach. It gave me a space to feel that everything was okay. It definitely was a journey and now I realise that you write your own rulebook.”

The four-piece collection is a small but mighty push for us all to rethink how we use and approach makeup. Harris doesn’t see using cosmetics any differently to employing a fabulous fashion accessory when putting an outfit together. “I think if I, and this collection, can be of any influence to make people look at makeup as a tool to be who you want to be, then that’s job done,” they said.

“Try and not think of makeup as something that makes you look ‘pretty’ and try and not look at it as something that you use to make yourself better, but to explore and enhance something within you. Use makeup as a tool to be your most authentic self.” 

VOGUE article

Shay Mitchell Is Keeping Her Family’s Beauty Game In Check During Quarantine

Shay Mitchell has ridiculously shiny hair. It’s something I’ve admired about her since my days of watching Pretty Little Liars in my dorm—years before I imagined life as a beauty blogger where I’d actually get to find out what products she uses to get those lustrous locks.

Now, thanks to Mitchell’s travel accessories brand BÉIS and Revolve, I finally know the secret to that shiny hair. BÉIS and Revolve have teamed up for a limited-edition beauty box filled with all the Shay Mitchell-approved products for, well, looking like she does. Inside the box, you’ll get full-size samples from brands like Embryolisse, KNC Beauty, Tower 28, Joanna Vargas, Ouai, and Oribe, plus the BÉIS cosmetic case.

Spoiler alert: Ouai Rose Hair & Body Oil and Oribe Travel Gold Lust Shampoo and Conditioner are the products responsible for her undeniably shiny hair.

The entrepreneur (she also has a cocktail brand, ONDA), actress, and new mother chatted with ELLE editors about how she finds her favourite beauty products, how life has changed with Atlas, and the first place she’s traveling to when the world is back to normal. 

How do you like to discover new beauty brands to try?

Mainly by word of mouth. I am recommended products by people I trust or who are experts in the beauty world. I also always discover new brands through Instagram.

What has changed about your beauty routine during your daughter Atlas’ first year?

Oh, you know—I used to be able to have a routine. Now I’m lucky if I brush my teeth in the morning (just kidding). To be honest, my beauty routine has always been pretty simple: I wash my face every evening, moisturize, use products with quality ingredients, and stay hydrated during the day. If I just have an easy day, I put on some mascara and call it a day.

What’s a beauty practice you learned from your mom and that you plan to pass down to Atlas?

I feel like it’s less a practice and more a routine. One of my fondest memories from growing up was watching my mom get ready for work. I remember her putting her lipstick on before she left the house. She was so chic, put together, and calm. When she came home, she always managed to take care of us, the house, and have a family dinner. I used just to think she was a mom, but now I know she is a superwoman.

What’s the secret to staying organized when you’re traveling?

You may laugh, but the whole reason that I started BÉIS was because I wanted products that both looked good and kept me organized on the road. I want to zip up my suitcase and unzip it at my destination and have everything be exactly where I need it. We have bags with sneaky storage, all the pockets your heart could desire, bags that transition from day to night, pieces that serve multiple functions. I am very biased, but they’re the best.

Where’s the first place you’re going to go on vacation when it’s safe?

The first place I will go is back to Canada (where I have gotten to go twice this year with quarantine restrictions), but I want to revisit my Gram.

After that, anywhere. I’m game. The top choices are Italy, Colombia, and Ireland.

Do you and Matte [Babel] share any beauty products? Have you taught him any tricks or vice versa?

Coconut oil for everything.

What projects are you most excited about for 2021?

Project “Let’s Fix the Earth” and project “Let’s Find Some Common Ground.” Then, of course, super excited and focused on continuing to grow BEIS and ONDA!

ELLE article

5 Realistic Beauty Resolutions That You Can Definitely Keep

When it comes to New Year’s beauty resolutions, the ones that are really going to carry on past January are the ones that feel the least restrictive and come with a serious side order of evident benefits to push us into brand new beauty territory. Maybe it’s time you gave up the habits that are impacting both your skin and the environment? Or, perhaps it’s time that you shake up the way you approach makeup and take your eyeliner skill to expert level?

Give up face wipes

Literally, stop now. From here on in, commit to choosing a makeup removing alternative that strays far away from the toxic reality of facial wipes. They might be affordable and easy to use, but their negative impact on the environment has long been documented. Water UK has even stated that 93 per cent of the gunk blocking our sewers is made up of wet wipes, and Marine Conservation found 12 wet wipes on average per 100 metres on UK beaches. Alternatives are now readily available: whether you want to choose reusable Face Halos or opt for a double cleanse and a muslin cloth, there really should be no need for you to ever open a pack again. Plus, if the environmental stats on wipes aren’t enough to dissuade you, consider that they are also bad for your complexion as they don’t probe deep enough to remove makeup entirely, and the scrubbing movements can cause unwanted irritation.

Don’t pick your spots

A beauty mandate we know well and have heard a thousand times, and yet, we all struggle to resist the temptation every time a new blemish pops up to say “hello”. Put down the at-home tools, stay away from your mirror and don’t even think about just quickly scratching away that whitehead. Scarring, further contamination and long-term damage are just some of the reasons we should leave this practice to the professionals. If you simply must remove a blemish, make sure that you pop, and don’t pick at the area. Cleanliness is key from your hands to cleaning the area after the gentle extraction. Picking is a 2021 no.

Try a new trick

Beauty resolutions shouldn’t all be about restriction. The new year can also prove the perfect time to try something new. Why not start with perfecting a new beauty technique, say, each month? By this time next year, you’ll have 12 new tricks in your beauty arsenal and perhaps a whole new perspective on your own routine. Whether you want to perfect a facial massage technique or finally master that cat-eye flick, YouTube is the best place to start, naturally.

Wash your brushes

It’s all well and good stepping out in an expertly executed makeup look that then gets washed away with a precise skincare routine, but, if your tools are dirty then you will find yourself right back at square one. Make the commitment to cleanse your kabuki et al at regular intervals. A routine of washing your brushes and tools with specialist cleansers will not only help your skin by removing impurities but will also give your makeup brushes a greater lifespan.

Recycle! Recycle! Recycle!

As the beauty industry increases its commitment to sustainability, make a concerted effort to do your part too. Much of the packaging your products come in will be comprised of various components that will all have different recycling capabilities. What this means is that you’ll need to invest some time into sorting through the empties and cartons. Or, consider the environment from the point of purchase and opt for brands and products that create with a green agenda and refillable bottles.

VOGUE article

The Best Natural and Organic Makeup Brands That Makeup Artists Actually Use

As many of us become more conscious of what we’re putting in our bodies and what we’re putting our bodies through, we’re also becoming more aware of what we’re putting on our bodies. While the performance of natural makeup used to pale in comparison to products from our favorite makeup counters, there are many natural makeup brands creating products that are richly pigmented, apply beautifully, and wear as well as their more synthetic competitors. You may already be using some of them and don’t even know they’re all-natural.

But before I get into industry favourites, let’s get one thing straight: “Natural” doesn’t automatically mean a product is better or safer for you, as the FDA has nebulous criteria on just what constitutes a natural product (“natural” isn’t regulated for cosmetics, so it can be used purely as a marketing term). “There is no real definition of ‘natural’ in the U.S. beauty industry,” says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. “As long as the bulk of your material is natural, you can say ‘natural-based.’ There is no regulation. The true naturals have seals like COSMOS Natural or Ecocert — European organizations that allow up to 5 percent synthetics.”

The FDA does not have a definition for the term “organic,” either, as it is not defined by either the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, which they use as guidelines. “‘Organic’ usually means USDA-certified food grades. There are limited numbers of products you can make to be classified as organic green,” King says.

“‘Clean beauty’ is a much better term for the consumer as the products are non-toxic and still effective,” says King. “‘Non-toxic’ means free from undesirable ingredients listed by the Environmental Working Group. This is better than claiming ‘natural’ or ‘organic’ as they are products that perform without compromising safety. People want natural because they assume natural ingredients are safe, which is not necessarily the case. They also may not be as effective as synthetic materials.”

This brings me to another point: An ingredient might be natural or organic, but that doesn’t mean that there’s no chance you’ll have an adverse or allergic reaction to it, so it’s important to be aware of what you’re using and how your body responds.

Thanks to growing consumer concern and education, we’re definitely seeing an uptick in the use of the phrase “clean beauty.” Last year, for example, Sephora announced the launch of Clean at Sephora, the company’s new category that clearly establishes which of their products are formulated without controversial ingredients. Those that meet Sephora’s ingredients guidelines are deemed “clean” and receive the retailer’s Clean at Sephora seal.

Ingredients aside, one of the benefits of using natural products is that many, if not all, ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free. As consumers, it’s never been more important to prioritize what we want in our makeup, and our money talks. These days there’s a clean option to switch out every product in your makeup routine, so it’s never been easier to avoid controversial ingredients.

But I also wanted to help you sort out your options. The following products have received high marks from professional makeup artists — who have seen and used it all — so you can start cleaning up your cosmetics bag.

ILIA Beauty

Ilia Beauty is focused on creating clean, pure products with organic bio-active botanicals that nourish skin as they wear. From lipstick to eye shadow and multiple base products, Ilia’s products give you a luxurious feel, look, and wear, while being some of the cleanest makeup you can use.

Puckey is a huge fan of the brand, spotlighting many of its products. “I love how smooth the Fade Into You Powder feels and how it really disappears on the skin. The Illuminators come in three shades that work for a variety of skin tones. I like that it comes in a stick form for easy application.”

“I love the Beauty Essential Shadow Palette in Prima, which has four great, neutral, everyday shades, including my favourite beige shade, and the Satin Cream Lip Crayons have a semi-matte finish and are all super easy to apply,” he adds, calling out the deep, burgundy shade 99 Balloons as a favorite.

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100% Pure Beauty

100% Pure Beauty has a full collection of skin care, makeup, hair, and body products, all made with natural ingredients. The brand is serious about the way it sources its ingredients, too, using a strict methodology to determine and confirm that its products contain no synthetic ingredients. In the past, I’ve been a big fan of its Coffee Bean Caffeine Eye Cream, and I love that its foundations are available in a wide range of shades.

Makeup artist Benjamin Puckey is a big fan of the brand’s lipsticks, telling Allure “100% Pure Cocoa Butter Matte Lipsticks come in such beautiful, bold, matte shades that you forget you’re working with a natural brand.”

He calls out the shade Sonora Red as one that “really packs a punch.”

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Kosas

Each Kosas product is made with active botanicals and balanced with safe synthetics, giving you luxury formulas, beautiful pigments that flatter a multitude of skin tones, and they all look as good as they feel. The beautiful face duos are available in both cream and powder formulas, each including a blush and an illuminator that complement each other and boost your face’s luminosity and glow.

The lipsticks are also not to be missed. Puckey tells Allure, “Kosas has a line of all-natural lipsticks in super chic black packaging. Rosewater (a dusky rose) and Thrillest (bright poppy red) are my favorites.”

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Bite Beauty

Did you know that Bite Beauty is natural and organic? I always forget. These luxe lipsticks are made with 12 different oils, as well as while pearl, silk, red wine, and organic butters; the result is a lipstick that’s incredibly creamy and hydrating, long-wearing and even has benefits from antioxidants for a product that’s actually good for your lips.

“No one does the range of bold color options in the right creamy/waxy base the way Bite does,” makeup artist Katey Denno explains. “They also make a lot of corresponding lip liners, which, until they filled it, had been a big hole in the marketplace.”

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Tower 28 Beauty

Newer to the natural scene, Tower 28 Beauty is becoming a fast favorite among makeup artists, beauty editors, and influencers alike. The whimsical packaging, quality ingredients, and vegan and cruelty-free promise are just a few of many reasons to love this L.A.-based brand, which prides itself on making products suitable for ultra-sensitive skin types. In fact, it’s tagline is #ItsOkayToBeSensitive, which is pretty clever if you ask me.

“Their products are so good for sensitive skin!” says makeup artist Robin Black, who battles rosacea. “I love their SOS Face Spray, cream blushes, and highlighters, and their cheek and lip products are getting lots of buzz for good reason. They’re so pretty on and so easy to use.”

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Lilah B. 

One of the innovators of the now popular and chic swivel compact, Lilah B. is all about creating simple, multipurpose beauty products with clean formulas. Without gluten, sulfates, or parabens, and packed with aloe and botanicals, these products take to skin beautifully, feel luxurious and nourishing, and look amazing on your face and on your vanity.

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Juice Beauty

Juice Beauty takes special care to ensure that its ingredients are certified organic so that no toxins, pesticides, synthetics, or fertilizers make it into its products. Starting with a base of organic botanical juice (hence the name), without any petroleum fillers or added water, each product is packed with antioxidants and concentrated skin-care benefits.

Denno is especially a fan of the Juice Boost Illuminator + Bronzer Duo. “Finely micronized shimmer particles add the perfect amount of highlight, no matter what your skin tone. [It] can be used directly on all areas you highlight: cheeks, Cupid’s bow, bridge of the nose, inner-eye corner, lid, clavicle, shoulders, or can be mixed into foundation to give an overall more glowy look,” she suggests.

“This stuff is unlike any other green beauty highlight product in that it dries completely (and quickly).”

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Lawless

The Lawless tagline is “Clean AF,” and the brand means it. Its liquid lipsticks are formulated without carcinogenic, toxic, hormone- or endocrine-disrupting ingredients. If people ingest up to five pounds of cosmetic chemicals every year, Lawless is trying to make sure that its products — that you put directly on your mouth and skin — are as safe as possible.

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RMS Beauty

Stemming from the founder’s own need for clean-beauty products free of toxic chemicals and metals, RMS Beauty is a line of ultra-luxurious, pared-down multitaskers that have become favorites in the industry. It’s a bit like a grown-up Glossier, with rich formulas, bright colors, and twinkling shimmers that make a welcome addition to any beauty routine, no matter how simple or complex it may be.

The line’s hero product is the Living Luminizer, a highlighter in a pot, that you tap onto the high points of your face, as you do, for a glow that is equal parts natural and ethereal. It pairs well with any product you put it on top of (or under) and wears like it’s a part of you.

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Milk Makeup

Since it’s inception in 2014, Milk Makeup has become a major power player in the vegan and cruelty-free beauty category. With innovative products that are as pretty and fun to use as they are effective, it’s easy to see why so many people adore the brand. Speaking of which, makeup artist Quinn Murphy, who works with stars like Kristen Bell, Julianne Moore, and Karlie Kloss — among myriad others — tells Allure it’s one of his top-favorite natural beauty brands. If you’ve yet to try anything from Milk, the Hydro Grip PrimerKush Mascara, and Glow Oils (pictured above) are all great products to start with.

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Beautycounter

With a tagline like #BetterBeauty, Beautycounter strives to use only the safest ingredients possible and none of the nasties. It even has what it calls “The Never List,” which includes harsh chemicals, dangerous preservatives like formaldehyde, and synthetic flavors and fragrances. The brand offers makeup, skin-care, and bath and body products, as well as an array of kits for men, babies, and traveling. Schlip is especially partial to its eye makeup products — specifically, the Velvet Eyeshadow Palette, which is a best-seller and excellent for creating a wide range of natural, everyday looks.

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Rituel De Fille

Founded by three sisters in Los Angeles, Rituel De Fille is known for its witchy aesthetic and magic-inspired formulas. “They have amazing products with minimal ingredients and really interesting colors,” says Black, who’s a huge fan of the brand. “Standouts are the Eye Soots, but the lip and skin products are also great… they hold up well on camera, too, so perfect for Zooming!”

If you love cream-based products, you can’t go wrong with any of its Inner Glow Créme Pigments or Enchanted Lip Sheers, both of which come in a variety of mesmerizing shades that suit most skin tones.

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ALLURE article

Zendaya On The Secret To Perfect Brows And The Skincare Step She Never Skips

On skincare rules

I never skip moisturizer – I feel like my face would just crack in half. Also, I do not sleep with make-up on. That’s a big rule. But overall, I really enjoy the process of skincare. It’s one of my many obsessions. Even though I tend to keep the routine basic, I try new products all the time and I enjoy the ritual [of it]. Sometimes it’s fun to treat yourself with a little facial before bed. I’ll incorporate different serums every now and then. I think it’s good to switch up your skincare so that your skin doesn’t get too used to it. My products always seem more effective after I’ve left them for a bit and come back.

On how she wakes up

I usually wake up to my dog and, unfortunately, go right to checking my phone. It’s a habit I’d like to break.

On the products she can’t live without

Concealer, because if you have a good concealer you can just tap it over problem areas and you’re good. That, and some kind of brow product, whether it’s a tinted brow gel or a brow pencil. I love my brows. Somehow they change your whole face. I’ve let mine grow out, and with different brow products I can change the shape and opaqueness. It’s so interesting how doing that can really change your whole look. 

On her biggest beauty risk

Every time I step on the red carpet, it’s a risk. We always do something risky.

On make-up free vs full glam

It’s day to day. Like most people, I don’t have time to go full beat all the time. So there are some times where I just chill. For events, my stylist Law and I like to create characters, and so my make-up will depend on what character I am that evening. For example, for the last Met Gala, we did a Joan of Arc reference. We added a little extra blush, because we wanted the look to remind people of an old Victorian painting with the rosy cheeks. 

Another year I had this giant dress, and dewy make-up and lashes — the whole thing. At the last minute, I looked up, and was like, “Something’s not right.” I took off the fake lashes, and I added extra gloss to my lips. But I still needed something. So I put on this bright, red-orange lipstick, and it was perfect. It was one of those things where it’s like, “Hmm, something’s just off … who is this character? I haven’t found her yet.” I like to figure it out as I go.

On her hair

I like to wear my hair natural. My natural curl pattern came back after I stopped putting heat on my hair so I try to just embrace [what I have] while learning to care for my natural hair.

On fragrance

Spraying perfume is the final step to polish off getting ready. If you’re like me and attach memories to scents, the right fragrance can bring a lot of joy. I always just do the old spray-and-walk-into-it technique.

On make-up looks

I’m a sucker for classic neutral tones, you know, just browns. They’re easier to blend, for one thing – you don’t have to be so precise. If you make a mistake, you can just add some more, no big deal. All that said, I do love a yellow eyeshadow! Or a very yellow-gold. I also appreciate a plain red lip, with nothing else on the eye or just a little mascara. When you find the right red, that can change everything, you know? It’s got to be bright enough, deep enough, not too blue, not too this, not too that. I usually just go for a simple matte red. 

On doing her own make-up

Once I started working with make-up artists, I’d just watch them. If I liked the way someone did my eyebrows, I’d just watch how they did it and try it a home. Over time, learning to do my make-up became about taking different techniques and products from people I liked and putting them into my Rolodex. Then it was a matter of trial and error. I’d go out on the red carpet and later look at photos. Sometimes, I’d be like, “Ooh, I look like a ghost,” so then I’d fix it the next time around. It’s really about trying, failing, and trying again.

I pretty much do all my own make-up for events now. It’s very therapeutic for me, especially if I’m ever stressed out before a press junket or a big event. There’s something about taking that time to just be with yourself that I find very relaxing.

On her go-to confidence booster

I go to work – I love working. That’s where I feel the most powerful and in my essence.

On spa treatments

I love a good massage, but the problem is most massage therapists don’t apply enough pressure! People think I’m going to break in half. I’m like, you’ve got to do a little bit more than that, you know?

On her personal mantra

I don’t know if I have a specific personal mantra, but I do think it’s important to live with a sense of gratitude. You can’t ever have more if you don’t appreciate what you have. I always try to list the things that I am thankful for and take a moment to appreciate those things. That act helps put everything into perspective.

VOGUE article