6 Ways To Make Your Foundation Look Like A Second Skin

Parisian make-up artist Violette’s top secret for how to apply foundation? Execute it without a trace. “I want people to say, ‘Oh my god, your skin looks amazing!’ not, ‘Your foundation is so great,’” she explains. And while finding the perfect formula is half the battle, once you have it, making like Houdini and ensuring it vanishes into your complexion is just as crucial. Here, three in-demand make-up artists share their fine-tuned tips for how to apply foundation and achieve that ever-elusive, second-skin finish.

Create a glowing canvas

Clean and moisturised skin is a no-brainer, but to really supercharge your glow, begin with a hydrating mask and follow it up with a lymphatic facial massage. When make-up artist Nina Park works with clients such as Zoë Kravitz and Bella Hadid, she begins with a sheet mask specifically targeted to their skin type, with ingredients such as rose to combat oiliness, aloe to treat dryness, and green tea to soothe inflammation. After masking, gently massage your moisturiser into the skin to boost circulation and reduce puffiness. “It creates a natural flush that makes the face look more awake,” says make-up artist Kira Nasrat, who helps give Jessica Alba that perpetually luminous complexion.

Prime as needed

To prime or not to prime? It’s an eternal question for amateurs and pros alike. While Violette typically skips the extra base step in the interest of using as little product as possible, when applied correctly, it can prolong foundation for all-day wear. “I use an anti-shine primer for hotspots like the forehead, hairline, sides of nose, and around the mouth, and then a sheer, illuminating one for the tops of the cheekbones,” explains Park, adding that she applies each with her fingertips.

Apply from the centre and move outward

Only apply foundation where it’s really necessary, insists Violette, who counts Estée Lauder Futurist Hydra Rescue Moisturizing Foundation with SPF 45 among her favourites. “Start in the centre of the face, on the apples of the cheeks, and slowly blend out,” she instructs, adding that another key part of the face is the area around the mouth, which is prone to yellow undertones and shadows. To ensure the foundation looks as natural as possible, Violette often skips the bridge of the nose — letting freckles show through for those who have them — and the corners of the nostrils, so the pigment doesn’t cling to dry patches.

Don’t paint, buff

No matter what tool you’re using — a foundation brush, a BeautyBlender, or your fingers — buff (or bounce, if you’re using a sponge) the foundation into your skin as opposed to “painting” it on to build coverage smoothly and avoid streakiness, says Park.

Strobe wherever the sun hits

For dimension, blend highlighter onto the high planes of the face that catch light naturally, such as the cheekbones, temples, and Cupid’s bow. “I’m not a fan of powder highlighters because it looks a bit fake to me,” says Violette. “Creamy balm textures will give you a dewiness as if you’re not wearing any products.

Blot, then set

First, soak up excess oil with blotting papers. Then, look to a featherweight translucent powder to seal in foundation and prevent unwanted sheen. “Use a brush to apply it very lightly and only to the areas that get the most shiny,” says Nasrat, adding that the leftover lustre is what will really drive home that second-skin guise. Silky smooth and even-toned, with just the right amount of lit-from-within dewiness, that’s how you execute believably perfect skin.

VOGUE

8 Cat Eyeliner Tricks To Make Your Eyes Look Bigger And More Striking

The eyes have always had it, but in the age of ongoing face mask-wearing, extra attention is being paid to the gaze. In lieu of red lips, it’s perennially classic and universally flattering cat eyeliner that’s receiving renewed focus. “Now more than ever, eyeliner is the most effective tool to instantly enhance the shape of the eyes, express our mood, and accentuate our unique individuality,” says Gina Brooke, who paints winged eyes on clients including Cate Blanchett and Sofia Boutella. From creating a flattering base to drawing on the perfect eye-elongating wing, here pro makeup artists reveal their tricks for nailing cat eyeliner.

Start by tightlining

To begin, make-up artist Emily Cheng, who works with Yara Shahidi and Laura Harrier, recommends tightlining, also known as the invisible eyeliner technique, which consists of “applying eyeliner in between the lashes” to make them appear thicker and fuller at the roots. It will create a base for a richer, longer-lasting cat-eye look.

Swipe on a natural eyeshadow

After pro Tasha Reiko Brown (who works with Alicia Keys and Tracee Ellis Ross) tightlines, she adds a sheer swipe of a light, natural eyeshadow on the lids for a clean backdrop to add contrast. “Use a domed eyeshadow brush to apply a warm natural brown in the crease,” instructs Brown. To double down on brightening the eye area, Brooke recommends adding a neutral, flesh-toned liner at the inner corners of the eye, as well as to the lower inner perimeter to instantly open the eyes and ultimately create the illusion of larger eyes. “Using a gradation for colour and smudging the liner away from the upper and lower lash lash line will widen the eyes and provide a fresh, wide-eyed appearance,” she says.

Find the right texture

While there’s power in choice, sometimes it can be overwhelming to decide what type of eyeliner — easy-to-apply pencil, precise felt-tip liquid, or creamy gel with a brush — will be best for your desired cat-eye result. “The right tools and texture can make all the difference,” confirms Brooke, who prefers to use a soft angled nylon fiber lip brush with gel eyeliner for application. 

Often, Cheng will take a hybrid approach. “I’ll start a wing with liquid liner and blend up and out with a black shadow,” she explains. “This will also contribute to making the eyes looking larger without the eyeliner looking like one large block.” Brown has a similar dual-minded approach, laying the groundwork with a kohl pencil before adding a layer of liquid liner, concentrating it at the base of the lashes for “sharply defined liner with a diffused edge.” 

No matter what, though, it’s about finding the right balance between what’s easiest to apply for you and your desired result.

Choose your shade

The most flattering shades are the ones you feel most confident in,” insists Brown. That being said, universally you can’t go wrong with warm, rich, deep browns to bring warmth around the eye. “It defines the eye without pulling focus and has more of a subtlety than black,” she says. For a similarly soft effect, Cheng recommends deep maroon as an alternative for a striking pop. But for the most part, she tends to stick to the ultimate classic, a highly-pigmented black liner, for a “sharp and clean” effect.

Strategise shape and lift

The intention of winged liner is to elongate the eye. To do so with optimal results, “Start with liner at the innermost corner and drag out slightly past the end of eye,” instructs Brown. “The line should be ultra-thin at the inner eye and gradually become slightly thicker as you move outwards.” One point that Brown drives home is that the tail end of liner doesn’t necessarily have to flick upwards in a cat eye motion. 

The tail end should angle slightly upwards and out for elongated eyes with a gentle lift,” says Brown. Before actually drawing on the flick or wing, really think about what kind of “lifted” look you want to achieve in the end. “Following rules of thumb for certain eye shapes won’t necessarily work in your favour as each face is a unique creation and other facial factors come into play,” she explains. “Really take a moment to analyse your face and your desired results and plan your technique from there.

Add the flick or wing

To keep steady and trace on your ideal shape, Cheng recommends keeping your eye open and looking into the mirror with a relaxed face before attempting to sculpt the shape. “Following the curve of your bottom waterline and sweeping upward is a good place to start in finding the angle of your eyeliner,” explains Cheng. “This way you’ll avoid going too straight or too angled upwards, unless that is the look you are going for. I find following the waterline to be the most natural and flattering.”

Another thing to consider is if you want a crisp or diffused edge — the latter, which Cheng calls a “soft baby wing” delivers a softer, sheerer finish. “It instantly defines your eyes and it’s an easy way to create shape,” she says.

Clean it up and refine

No matter what your desired effect is, a tapered point Q-tip will be your best friend to clean up errors, as well as sharpen lines and shapes. “When I have a liner that has gotten too thick or to correct any mistakes, I’ll take a pointed make-up Q-tip dampened with micellar water and refine the line,” says Brown, cautioning that you should be wary of using traditional Q-tips as the fibers can get caught in mascara on lashes and travel into the eye. 

Additionally, eschew make-up remover, which can disturb the surrounding make-up around the line too much and leave an oily residue (stick to micellar water instead). Another tried-and-true technique is harnessing the correcting and contrast-creating power of concealer. “Finishing with concealer underneath will also accentuate the liner,” says Cheng.

Finish with mascara

The final touch is mascara. After liner has dried, curl the lashes if desired, then wiggle it on. “The end result will give you depth and definition around the eye, and lashes that standout against brightened lids,” says Brown. For an eye-widening, wing-accenting curve, Cheng suggests “concentrating mascara on the outer corner, which will help elongate,” she says.

VOGUE

Grunge Makeup Is Back — Here Are 8 Looks to Get You Inspired

Beauty trends tend to be cyclical. Everything has its moment, and what’s on-trend eventually falls out of style until enough time passes — then it’s back. Now, the latest trend to re-emerge from the vault is the grunge aesthetic. 

Yes, the kohl-rimmed eyes, brick-colored lipstick, and matte complexions that were popular in the ’90s have returned, and they’re all over runways, Instagram, and red carpet events. 

Celebrity makeup artist and founder of KIMIKODani Kimiko Vincent, says this grunge aesthetic is all about “a bold, gritty, and imperfect makeup look that eschews popular culture with defiance.” 

For her, the key characteristics of the look are messy, smoked-out eyeliner, “Like you’ve been partying all night,” she says, and a deep lipstick in a dark burgundy tone. “This is not a precisely-applied lip complete with liner; it looks more like it was reapplied at 2 am in the dark bathroom of a bar.” 

For celebrity makeup artist and Haus Labs global artistry director, Sarah Tanno, grunge makeup is less about the individual elements and more about the collective energy it radiates. “Grunge makeup has a ‘lived in’ vibe — it allows for more freedom in the sense that there are no rules to follow and gives off an ‘IDGAF’ attitude.” 

Ahead, eight grunge-inspired makeup looks to inspire your inner angst.

Smudged-Out Smoky Eye 

During the most recent New York Fashion Week, models at the Nicole Miller show wore eyeliner looks that were as bold as they were imperfect. They also wore matte foundation and matte lip colors. It was the perfect makeup look to complement the brand’s grunge-inspired clothing collection.

Glam Eyeshadow 

Models in the Alice + Olivia’s FW22 NYFW show wore glam black eyeshadow which was complemented by velvety-matte foundation makeup and a simple neutral-pink lip. “2022 is all about drawing attention to the eyes with a bold eye makeup, and grunge fits right into that with a strong, dark eye,” says Tanno.

Brick Red Lips 

Shay Mitchell’s take on grunge makeup involves some of the most classic elements — that is, smoky eyeshadow and a brick red lipstick. When it comes to the latter, Tanno’s favorite product to use is the Haus Labs Le Monster Matte Lip Crayon. Try the shade ‘Wine Mouth,’ a warm mahogany brown that screams glam grunge.

Bleached Eyebrows 

The grunge makeup trend is also Versace-approved. At the most recent Milan Fashion Week show, Gigi Hadid walked the runway wearing a bold swipe of charcoal eyeshadow with a nude matte lip. The look was kicked up a notch with bleached brows.

Dark Red Lips 

With smoked-out eyes and a dark lip, this look is classic grunge. “A lot of people try to update grunge makeup by making it more precise with a tidy smoky eye and a well-lined lip, but to me, this loses the rebellious essence of the look,” Vincent says. “For an updated version that still maintains the essence of grunge makeup, choose a blendable eyeliner in black or deep brown and smudge it slightly with fingers or a brush. You can even add a little gloss over the lids for an undone eye. Finish with a black volumizing mascara — and don’t worry about perfect application because the look is meant to be a bit messy.” Accentuate the look with a dark wine-colored lip color, a fresh no-makeup makeup complexion, and defined brows.

Graphic Eyeliner 

Julia Fox took the grunge makeup trend and put an editorial spin on it, opting for a thick winged liner look that was rounded and upturned at her temples. True to theme, she kept her complexion and lips matte, choosing a powdery berry color for the latter.

Kohl-Rimmed Eyes 

Sydney Sweeney chose a grunge-inspired look for a recent karaoke night. Look closely, and you’ll see smokey, kohl-rimmed eyes and a velvet matte complexion. To achieve this look for yourself, all you need is a good eyeliner pencil. Tanno recommends the Haus Labs Eye-Dentify Gel Kohl Eyeliner, and recommends applying it all along the eyelids before blending it out with a brush. “This liner has a nice slip and blendability, making it perfect to create this look and it lasts all day,” she says.

Neutral-Toned Lips 

Kourtney Kardashian has been channeling a punk-grunge look for a while now, and this is a glamorous version of that aesthetic. Notice her smokey eyeshadow, defined brows, and matte complexion. Her fluttery lashes and glossy neutral-brown lip are what elevate the look and give it a modern feel. 

For a similar brown-neutral lip color, makeup artist Christine Cherbonnier recommends the MAC Cosmetics Lip Pencil in Cork. “It’s a must-have for that neutral brown lip or a base to create a red or brown undertone for  many skin tones,” she says. “Every ’90s fan or makeup artist needs this color in their kit. It’s classic and timeless.

INSTYLE

The Armani Runway Offers a Masterclass in the Perfect Smoky Eye

With a focus on the eyes this season, the beauty at the Giorgio Armani fall 2022 show in Milan on Sunday night complemented a collection full of plush velvets, reflective metallics and smoky hues. Statement eyes were paired with a sophisticated nude lip on the runway. 

As per the brand’s Instagram page, Mr. Armani can be found “backstage before a fashion show overseeing every detail from the beauty to the runway,” so you can see his meticulous hand in every final touch. The show was staged in a small theatre, reminiscent of an intricate jewelry box, and models walked the runway in silence. The designer’s decision not to use any music in the show was a sign of respect in light of the unfolding tragedy in Ukraine.

To emulate the Armani look, try a smoky line of eyeshadow along the crease of the eye, applied using a small but dense smudge brush. That way, the eyeshadow pigment remains while giving you the freedom to draw your cut crease with the space to smudge out (or conceal) any mistakes. To soften the eyes and brighten the look, a matte white eyeshadow was used in the inner corners, giving an ethereal halo effect and adding even more dimension to the look.

A few individual eyelash extensions were applied on the outer corners of the eyes on a number of models to achieve the right amount of flutter and lift the eyes with minimal effort. Brows were filled and extended, but the focus was on the structured eyeshadow. Using Giorgio Armani’s Lip Power, each model wore their perfect nude. The pigmented yet satin finish of the lipstick left lips looking healthy and hydrated.

Meanwhile, models’ hair was styled in cornrows or combed back and saturated with product to create a cool high-shine wet look that perfectly complemented the dazzling metallics in the collection. 

VOGUE

How To Paint Eye Make-up Like Monet, According To The Ulla Johnson Runway

As a blanket of snow fell upon Bryant Park just outside, the Ulla Johnson runway supplied showgoers with a soothing respite at the New York Public Library. Inside the grand marble lobby, the winding runway was punctuated by towers of mimosas and dotted with abstract wood sculptures by Alma Allen, while the soulful sounds of singer PawPaw Rod and smokey aroma of Astier de Villatte incense wafted through the air.

Above this season’s slouchy mohair pullovers, psychedelic-print taffeta dresses, and lush cocoon coats, there was a feast of beauty details supplying Johnson’s signature bohemian romance with an unexpected edge. Hairstylist Bob Recine crafted a lineup of chic styles including sleek, fabric-wrapped low ponytails; choppy, asymmetrical bobs; and waist-grazing braids embellished with polished stone charms. Playing off the collection’s neutrals, nails were painted in Tenoverten’s Canal, a creamy nude in total harmony with Johnson’s warm, earthy world.

The most dramatic statement came by way of the eyes, with make-up artist Romy Soleimani administering sharp, graphic cat-eyes flicks characterised by a tiny dash of negative space along the lower lash line. “It’s a bit tough,” she explained while etching on the shape using Bobbi Brown’s carbon black Ink Liner Pen. “Everything Ulla does is soft and romantic, so I like to add a little bit of hardness.” But for some models, that was just the beginning.

Monet-like, Impressionistic,” is how Soleimani described the soft-focus, two-tone “watercolour-y” treatments she proceeded to bestow on a few select gazes. She began by haphazardly tapping on a matte, pale greige pigment with a blending brush, before layering on finger-smudged swipes of metallic gold along the inner corners and brow bone. “I wanted them to feel not too colourful, not too earthy – more minimal and futuristic,” she said. The face was finished with fresh, healthy skin enhanced with a “high flush” on the upper cheekbones, blended with Luxe Matte Lipstick in pink-coral Bitten Peach and Crushed Lip Colour in cool pink Buff, each tying back to tones in the collection, and a dab of Extra Repair Eye Cream Intense on temples for a “natural sheen.”

While the prospect of painting on Impressionist-inspired eye make-up sounds intimidating, making like Monet is closer to child’s play than you think, stresses Soleimani. “It’s spontaneous,” she says, “like finger painting.” And just like that…this editor already has plans to embellish her next cat-eye with a dose of off-kilter colour and a gilded brow bone highlight.

VOGUE

Will the Return of Y2K Beauty Bring Back Ultra-Thin Eyebrows?

The noughties were a take-no-prisoners time for our brows; we wielded our tweezers with abandon, and many of us, regrettably, reduced our arches to razor-thin tadpoles.

We know better now, you might think, but with the Y2K redux upon us—#Y2K has now amassed almost 5 billion views on TikTok—the fated cycling of trends, and Bella Hadid leading the skinny power-brow charge, it might be time to revisit your brow shape with a fresh new perspective.

It seems inevitable that, eventually, the natural brow is going to have to succumb to the tweezer again,” says makeup artist Troy Surratt. Trust that Surratt, a protégé of Kevyn Aucoin, knows a thing or two about pencil-thin brows. After all, Aucoin was the one who helped popularize them in the ’90s as he made up the faces of the most iconic supers of the time—Kate Moss, Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, and Linda Evangelista. “There was a time that we decided together that everyone needed to look like Carole Lombard and have really skinny eyebrows,” recalled designer and collaborator Isaac Mizrahi in the Larger Than Life: The Kevyn Aucoin Story. “The next thing I knew, [Aucoin] was plucking everybody’s eyebrows.

After the millennium, fashionably crafted brows started to get a bit more mathematical. “In the early ’00s, brow-shaping experts were gaining notoriety and creating a sort of diktat that the eyebrow should start straight above the tear duct of the eye, the highest point of the arch should be at the edge of the iris, and the ‘tail’ of the brow should taper off,” explains Surratt, adding that brows were then shaped accordingly to “formulaic perfection,” using a wax, tweezer, threading, or even a combination of all three. The pro? “This thinner, more preened eyebrow look can have an overall eye brightening effect,” says Surratt of the best case scenario, adding that it also creates more real estate for intense eyeshadow or bold liner looks. The con? “Brows that are overly sharp or angled may result in an overall harsh or aggressive effect on the face,” he says.

L.A. brow expert Kristie Streicher, who has observed more than a few Gen Zers keen on “going thin,” believes there is a place for the spirit of Y2K-era beauty, within reason. “I love seeing this on runways and in editorials,” says Streicher, “but…it’s just not practical for everyday life.” She goes on to emphasize that one’s natural brow shape is typically in proportion with their features. “There are people who naturally have more of a defined and smaller brow, which is usually matched with smaller, more defined features,” she explains. “It can look stark and be ‘a lot of face’ when not naturally occurring on someone as well as a lot to maintain!

Dani Kimiko Vincent, the longtime artist behind Sandra Oh’s arches, is in agreement. “There is a ‘best brow’ for your face structure, and that’s usually the brow you had before making any major modifications,” says Vincent. “I don’t believe in straying too far from one’s natural shape.” While she doesn’t see the intensely skinny brows of the ’90s and Y2K becoming commonplace, Vincent does see natural brow shapes, which include thinner brows, making a comeback “almost as a counter to the full brow aesthetic that has been going strong for some time now,” she says. She also underlines that thin brows have historically been associated with various counter cultures, from the brassy flappers of the ’20s to various punk scenes. “I believe people are feeling freer to embrace their individuality, and with uncertainty about the future, we are perhaps nostalgic for those playful and simpler-seeming times,” she says. Editorial makeup artist Jen Myles, who often works with Hadid, also sees the beauty in the pencil-thin arch comeback. “I think everyone’s ready for a change, a more manicured, ultra-groomed look,” says Myles of switching things up after years of abundantly thick arches. “For anyone who hasn’t microbladed or spent the entire last decade growing back, their brows may be ready to embrace the Y2K look.” As we navigate the changing brow landscape, here are a few pro-approved strategies for exploring the Y2K trend with a 2022 perspective (and plenty of caution).

Go Easy on Your Brows

Old habits die hard, even a decade or two later. If you’re tempted to go dramatically thinner, strongly consider dropping the tweezers and consulting a professional who can offer subtle tweaks. “After helping thousands of women, as well as myself, to grow back their natural brows after the ’90s had ravaged them, and knowing firsthand the damage that over-tweezing and waxing can cause, I would strongly caution against pulling out the hair to experiment,” says Streicher. Instead of removing the hair, she suggests styling brows into a thinner, more defined shape by brushing the hairs down and over or pinching the hairs together into a thin line. If you have very full, thick brows and want to explore, she says to try dermaplaning or shaving the hairs to prevent permanently damaging the hair follicle.

This new brow trend inspired by the early aughts should be thought of in a kinder, gentler version of its predecessor—more directional and uplifting, less severe or architectural,” agrees Surratt. “It should maintain a subtlety and softness, that is what makes it current.

Soften Your Fill-In

A modern interpretation of the Y2K brow aesthetic could include less intense filling with products and narrowing the shape by concentrating the fill well within the core brow,” says Vincent. “Without removing hair, you can play with the intensity and placement of the arch, simply by strategically applying your brow makeup.” The key tool for doing this is a fine pencil that allows you to draw individual hairs and create a full brow that still looks natural. It is also versatile enough to create precise definition if you are experimenting with different looks, like a thin brow, she adds.

Up Your Tame Game

Whether brows are penciled or bare, I always recommend a clear gel for style and hold, as it can lift and add fullness where hairs may have been drooping or can alternatively be used to create a slimmer brow,” says Vincent. If you want a product that adds a hint of color for increased definition as you set, Myles’s go-to is neat strokes of Glossier’s Boy Brow. “A few swipes and brows are set in place with just the right amount of tinted color.”

Promote (Yes!) Healthy Hair Growth

Thick or skinny, a little TLC goes a long way to preserving the health of your brows. For light brow exfoliation, Streicher recommends using a soft spoolie brush to gently brush hairs in an upward motion, which can remove dead skin cells that tend to accumulate under and around the hair shaft. “This will also stimulate the brow skin area and increase blood flow to strengthen and promote healthy hair growth,” she says. Next, Streicher encourages her clients to massage a nourishing oil, like her Vitamin E–rich Afore Oil, or supercharged serum, into the brow area daily. “It can protect, moisturize, and maintain healthy, strong hair growth.” Your future brows, no matter what shape they take, will thank you.

VOGUE

At 74, Jane Birkin Is Still The Ultimate Beauty Icon

If someone had only told me to get rid of the eye make-up sooner!” Jane Birkin once lamented to Vogue. Birkin, who turned 74 recently, is speaking of the Swinging ’60s, when she decamped from her native England and landed in France with exaggerated etchings and layers of lower-lash mascara.

Fast-forward to the following decade, when the gap-toothed gamine abandoned her heavy hand to embrace a more au naturel approach. As she later noted, “It was nice because then you looked like what you looked like in the morning.” It’s this effortless élan, now immortalised on countless Instagram feeds, that has come to symbolise Birkin, defining laissez-faire beauty for a whole new generation of French-girls-in-training.

No matter whether her long lengths have been haphazardly piled atop her head or shorn short as she stands onstage in a cashmere pull and faded jeans, the actress, singer, and songwriter has long espoused the kind of fresh facade that’s achieved not with a coveted cosmetic but rather, simply, a smile. “It takes 10 years off!” she’s famously quipped. Consider it sage advice for the New Year ahead.

Below, a look at Jane Birkin’s best beauty moments.

1966 ALBUM / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
1969 PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES

1970 PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOHN COWAN, VOGUE, JANUARY 1970
1973 SCREENPROD / PHOTONONSTOP / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
1974 PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES
1975 PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES
1980 PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES
2001 PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES
2002 PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES

VOGUE

Must-See ’90s Supermodel Beauty Looks

We turn to the ’90s for most things nowadays; from hair trends to styling tips and tricks, we simply can’t get enough what is now a golden era of fashion and beauty. But what about those that were there at the time, creating the trends? While some of our favourite supermodels were hard pushed to get out of bed for less than $10,000 each day – Linda and Christy, we’re looking at you – others knew how to party in style. Those were the glory days. 

Here, British Vogue takes a look at some of the best ’90s supermodel beauty looks – from Claudia Schiffer’s full-glam hair and make-up to the mussed-up, more bohemian looks of Amber Valletta and Kate Moss – for your viewing pleasure.

Naomi Campbell, 1998

Elle MacPherson, 1991

Claudia Schiffer, 1995

Amber Valletta, 1995

Helena Christensen, 1994

Tyra Banks, 1995

Linda Evangelista, 1990s

Eva Herzigova, 1995

Beverly Peele, 1990s

Christy Turlington, 1990

Christie Brinkley, 1990s

Kate Moss, 1994

Kristen McMenamy, 1990s

Shalom Harlow, 1990s

Carla Bruni, 1990s

VOGUE

Celebrity Makeup Artists Declare These 13 Makeup Trends Supreme for 2022

While there are some straightforward styles, every expert that was interviewed said that the big theme for 2022 will be individualized beauty. So long are the days of contouring our faces the same way and doing our eyeshadow in traditionally “pretty” blends. Nowadays, they say makeup application is all about doing it in a way that makes you feel good.

It’s so evident that [makeup] is about feeling it and an emotional connection to color,” says Lisa Eldridge, celebrity makeup artist and Lancôme’s global creative director. She notes that she’s seeing people wear several colors on their face without necessarily blending it the way we’ve traditionally been taught to: “It’s just color for color’s sake — there’s something so nice and playful about it.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #74 series on my blog.

Moody Makeup

In 2022, we will see unconventional explorations of self through experimental makeup looks that are more about individual expression than achieving perfection,” predicts celebrity makeup artist Robin Black. To create this type of makeup look, she says to let your mood take control. “Try anything that pops into your mind,” she says. “It doesn’t need to be flawless, you don’t need to watch a tutorial or spend hours painstaking creating it — no rules, no ‘how-tos.”

Face-Lifting Techniques

Thanks to viral social media videos, people have learned techniques to make their makeup give their faces a lifted look. On TikTok, for example, we saw users apply concealers on the outer corners of their eyes up toward the edges of their brows to give the illusion of wide-awake eyes.

Another example is a technique shown by Eldridge above, where she applies lip liner tactfully to give the illusion of fuller, more lifted, happier-looking lips. To copy, she suggests first applying concealer to the outer edges of your lips to act as a guide, then over-lining the center of the bottom lip, and when drawing up toward the corners, she says to bring the liner into the natural lip and avoid the very edge.

Bejeweled Eyes

HBO’s Euphoria planted the seeds of rhinestone-heavy makeup into our minds, and Pinterest predicts that the dazzling trend is here to stay. On its platform, it reported seeing a 110 percent increase in searches for crystal eye makeup over the last year, indicating that we’ll be seeing more sequins, glitter, pearls, rhinestones, and more in 2022.

High-Shine Lips

As Serena van der Woodsen once famously said, “Lipstick lasts longer, but gloss is more fun.” Thankfully, celebrity makeup artist and founder of Makeup by Mario, Mario Dedivanovic, predicts that high-shine lips are expected to make a major comeback in 2022.

It’s a look that’s playful and pouty, but can also have benefits when infused with skincare to treat lips,” he adds. To recreate, simply add your favorite lip gloss to either bare lips or over your favorite lipstick for an even bigger lip moment. Dedivanovic suggests his Pro Volume Lip Gloss ($22, sephora.com).

Futuristic Embellishments

Instead of channeling a blast from the past, launch yourself to the future with this style of makeup. “This trend is all about making a statement,” says Black. “The best thing about this look is that faux tattoos, face stickers, and foils are easy to remove so there is no commitment.”

We recommend Paintlab’s Eye Stickers ($10, urbanoutfitters.com) to add some easy drama to your eyes.

Soft Sculpting

We’ve all contoured, but strongly defined cheekbones and harsh contrasts are a thing of the past. “There’s a big difference between camera-ready contouring and real life, and I think the beauty world exhaled knowing there’s an easier way with products created to look natural, effortless, and do the work for you,” says Dedivanovic, adding that that’s why he launched his brand’s Soft Sculpt Collection. “I’m confident we’ll be seeing more of it and in gorgeous, skin-loving textures and formulas.” 

Kitten Eyeliner

Eldridge predicts that this baby cat liner will dominate makeup looks in the new year. “It’s very youthful, because it’s less heavy and less pulled-back than a heavy cat-eye,” she says.

Danielle Kimiko Vincent, celebrity brow artist and founder of KIMIKO, agrees that this trend will be everywhere. “Rather than very heavy tails, eyeliner will be more narrow, begin in the middle of the eye and be drawn outwards to create a natural lift — think slimmer tails with a subtle flick,” she says. To recreate, Eldridge suggests using a powder in the same color as your liner to give the tip a nice shadow.

Celebratory Lipstick

Last spring, lipstick saw a surge in popularity as many of us removed our face masks in light of loosening COVID restrictions. Should the pandemic lessen in severity, Eldridge predicts that bright, bold lipsticks will come back with even more celebration than before.

That’s what I’m looking toward — really fresh, summery-spring makeup that screams of us being able to get out in the world and just have fun,” she says. She predicts that shades such as bright pink, purple, and orange will have their moment in the new year and recommends the Lancôme L’Absolu Rouge Lipsticks in shades Rêve Toujours, Rose Cocktail, and Paris S’eveille ($32 each, lancome-usa.com) to be on-trend.

Lifted Brows

The brow lamination look is sticking around as lifted brows that open up the eyes are flattering,” declares Kimiko Vincent. “However, this trend will take on a softer form than a lamination or soap brow, which have maximum vertical hairs throughout the brow that lay quite flat and can appear two-dimensional.”

1960s Styles

I feel that because most of our faces have been partly covered with the masks, that putting extra TLC in eye makeup application is where the rise of ’60s makeup trends comes from,” celebrity makeup artist Dominique Lerma previously told InStyle. “It only makes sense that the ’60s would make a comeback being as that there are so many creative ways you can use lashes and liner to express yourself.”

Multi-Functional Color Cosmetics

There’s no reason to have an eyelash-growth serum and a mascara when you can have a two-in-one product that does it all (such as the Talika Lipocils Mascara, $35, amazon.com) — and the beauty industry has taken note.

We’ll see more color formulas across foundation, eye makeup, blush, lips, and even nails to incorporate treatment ingredients as consumers want to treat their skin 24/7,” predicts clean beauty chemist Krupa Koestline.

New Old-School Blush

Blush placement is a topic that’s been front and center on TikTok, and in 2022, Eldridge predicts that it’ll be found in an unexpected spot. “In a lot of vintage portraitures, you see that blush came down a little bit lower than we’re told we should, but it actually looked pretty fresh on the skin,” she says.

Dopamine-Fueled Eyes

Eldridge says that splashes of unexpected, bold colors are going to be everywhere this year. “I’m seeing so much more yellows, purples, pinks, blues, greens — colors which traditionally have are considered quite out-there are becoming a lot more mainstream.”

This goes in hand with Pinterest’s predictions, which indicate that vibrant, feel-good looks are going to be a go-to trend. For newbies who want to step out of their comfort zone, Eldridge suggests applying a tad bit of color to the inner or outer edges of your eyes for a subtle, yet impactful, bang of color. “It’s always looks so nice and fresh,” she adds.

INSTYLE

One Thing Is For Sure: Gigi Hadid Gives Good Eyeliner

There is eyeliner and then there is eyeliner: Gigi Hadid’s recent look falls firmly into the latter camp. Expertly demonstrating how to make a floating graphic eyeliner look really good, the model and her make-up artist, Carolina Gonzalez, swapped its traditional placement on the lash line for the brow bone instead.

Reminiscent of the white eyeliner look Hadid showed off in February 2020 during Paris Fashion Week, the green line sat mid-way between the top of her eyelid and her full, brushed-up brows. Who knew that a single line could so expertly frame her jade green eyes?

The trick to pulling off a look like this? The majority of it is confidence. Hadid is never afraid to experiment with her make-up; her looks have included pops of neon yellow and dramatic blue winged eyeshadow, to name a couple. 

Other than that, you need a steady hand (this line needs to be straight) and an eyeliner that stays put. Charlotte Tilbury’s Eye Colour Magic Liner Duo in Green Lights offers two shades of green in one pencil and glides on, while Estée Lauder’s Double Wear Stay-in-Place Eye Pencil won’t budge for love nor money. Prefer a liquid liner? Look no further than Dior’s Felt Tip Eyeliners, which come in an array of hues from green to pink and the longer, fine tip makes it easy to achieve a ruler-straight line.

VOGUE