The Best Beauty Instagrams Of The Week: Raquel Willis, Chloe Yu, And More

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #47 series on my blog.

This past week on Instagram, a few muses welcomed spring with colorful eyeshadows. Model Pooja Mor glistened under the sunlight, wearing turquoise eye shadow and a big smile, while model Chloe Yu had her lids saturated in blue and pink, thanks to makeup artist Michael Anthony (and the Pat McGrath Labs Subversive palette!). Then, embracing aquatic shades, “Versace Hottie” Precious Lee reported “for duty” in a cobalt blue shadow and Barbie Ferreira sported a blue smoky eye courtesy of Sam Visser.

More standout eye makeup came by way of Aweng Ade-Chuol, who graced feeds with artfully drawn black winged liner, full lashes, and bronzed cheeks, as well as Tracee Ellis Ross, who had thick, sooty swipes of eyeliner frame her upper and lower lash lines, with soft curls grazing her forehead.

Meeting the arrival of warm weather, Erykah Badu leaned into her light with a swipe of terra-cotta lipstick and the VanJess sisters were feeling peachy keen with blushy cheeks and pink manicures. Activist, writer, and cultural organizer Raquel Willis donned a red lip and sleek waves, and gave us all a much-needed reminder to let “the sunshine in.” As for Carly Cushnie? She ushered in International Women’s Day by celebrating the strong women around her. “I couldn’t be prouder to be a mother to my girls and [am] so grateful for everything they have taught and continue to teach me,” she wrote in a caption. “Thank you to all you incredible women out there. What an honor to be a woman.”

VOGUE article

11 Of Sophia Loren’s Best Vintage Beauty Looks Of All Time

You will have spied Italian actor Sophia Loren in British Vogue’s April issue as part of the Hollywood Portfolio, which features 27 of the world’s biggest stars. Photographed looking as glamorous as she has always been, the 86-year-old silver-screen legend has long been a fan of a glamorous look and her attitude to beauty is refreshing. She once said:

“Beauty is how you feel inside, and it reflects in your eyes. It is not something physical.”

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #45 series on my blog.

It only goes to show that Loren feels as good on the inside as she externally looks. Her penchant for Italian glamour has always been a whole beauty mood – it is timeless. There is the trademark feline flick and voluptuous eyelashes; the bold lipsticks, from red to pink; glamorous blow dries; and her bold eyebrows, expertly filled in. These are looks that many of us still imitate today and she is regularly name-checked backstage at fashion shows. Here, let’s take a look at some of her most show-stopping vintage beauty looks over the years.

A pink-flushed lip and excellent brows make for an excellent Italian countryside look.
Killer eyes and hair wrapped in a bath robe – what’s not to love?
The ’50s bob to end all bobs. 
Diamonds, immaculately coiffed hair and the ultimate feline flick.
Loren elevated her beautiful eyes with lashings of mascara and eyeliner.
Like she previously said, happiness – and a big smile – is where true beauty lies.
Consider her the ultimate brow goals.
The glossy peach lip! The eyeliner! The wispy fringe! And, of course, the marabou feathers.
Loren wears a peach lip once more for a day outside.
A masterclass in the bold, red lip.
From the red lip to the bold eye, she is glamour personified.

VOGUE article

A Tribute To Princess Diana’s Blue Eyeliner Obsession

“I like to be a free spirit,” Princess Diana once said. “Some don’t like that, but that’s the way I am.” More than two decades since her untimely death, the public’s long-standing fascination with her – as a royal, a humanitarian, a style icon, and an unapologetic rebel — has yet to wane. Season 4 of The Crown is only sparking more intrigue around the ways in which she bucked royal tradition with a self-assured attitude and distinct codes of self-expression.

As a kid of the ’90s, I, like many, have always been taken with Princess Diana’s beauty, grace, and glamour. But of all her signatures, the one that has always stuck out to me was her ’80s-era proclivity for swipes of electric blue eyeliner; most strikingly worn with one of her sparkling diamond tiaras. Oh, the contrast! Yes, I know it was the ’80s and that it was the banner decade for colourful make-up, but for a woman of her stature, to me it always seemed kind of punk, a means of subtly railing against the royal system. 

Plus, her pared-back approach to a decidedly bold colour statement brought a real-world sensibility to the look. “In the ’80s, blue eyeliner was about pulling out or brightening up naturally blue eyes,” explains make-up artist and Tatcha’s first-ever global director of artistry Daniel Martin, who famously gave Meghan Markle her natural wedding-day glow. “She kept it close to the lash line, enhancing the iris by creating this monochromatic tonal effect on the eye. She never took it up to her eyelid, which would create an entirely different effect altogether. I think her wearing it in that way made it wearable for so many.”

While I, for one, love an aqua eye and think of Princess Diana every time I smudge a cyan pencil across my waterlines for a quick dose of colour, I know it can be a polarising choice — and surely was for Princess Diana as the more-is-more ’80s gave way to the minimalism of the ’90s. So I wasn’t surprised to learn that upon meeting Princess Diana on her Vogue photo shoot in 1991, make-up artist Mary Greenwell, who worked with her throughout the ’90s, convinced her to add more neutral eyeliner shades to her repertoire. “In the ’80s, a lot of people were wearing blue eyeliner, and she was so young! She could get away with doing whatever she wanted,” says Greenwell. “She was experimental and absolutely loved make-up, but when she went out on the red carpet, we just tried to make her as glamorous and gorgeous as possible for the time.”

That being said, blue eyeliner certainly has its place, especially in the free-for-all that is the year 2020, where self-expression reigns supreme. “Right now, it’s about whatever you want to do, and making it look the best for you,” says Greenwell. “That’s what Diana always did.” Her tips for pulling off bold ticks of eyeliner, no matter how bright or understated the shade, is to keep the rest of the face fresh and vibrant: Clean skin enhanced with sheer foundation and feather-light swirls of blush and bronzer “to bring out the flush” in the face. “It’s about beautiful simplicity!” she says.

VOGUE article

Danessa Myricks Beauty Is Officially Sold At Sephora Now

Danessa Myricks’ eponymous makeup brand kicks off a partnership that’s been a year in the making. You can shop nine product categories, including the Best of Beauty-winning Colorfix, on Sephora’s virtual shelves for glowing, professional-tier looks.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #42 series on my blog.

Although most of us aren’t wearing makeup as often as we used to, experimenting with makeup and carving out that time for myself has become a major solace for me throughout the past year.

Danessa Myricks Beauty exclusively revealed to Allure that the iconic brand is partnering up with Sephora to launch most of its products on sephora.com. The giant beauty retailer has been watching the brand’s growth for quite a while, and founder Danessa Myricks says the “official courtship” lasted around a year. “From the very beginning, [Sephora has] demonstrated a deep commitment to my long-term success,” Myricks adds. “They’ve followed my journey, knew of all my products, attended my master classes, and were actual customers of the brand.”

Last year was a long-overdue time of retail reckoning spurred by Sharon Chuter’s #PullUpOrShutUp challenge. In addition to sharing statistics on Black employees (especially in leadership positions), major retailers also committed to filling their shelves with more Black-owned brands and partnering with experts in the space to achieve diversity-centric goals with a conscience.

As a small-business owner and Black entrepreneur, Myricks went into initial discussions with Sephora with a certain, necessary level of precaution — but, as you can probably tell, both sides were able to make it work. “I never felt like a box checked off on a quota,” she says. “[Sephora was] thoughtful and present when it was time to have difficult conversations around inclusion and diversity and were mindful of the commitment it takes for a small brand like mine to scale at this level.” 

These initiatives go beyond her own brand, too. “What excited me the most about this partnership is not only will this be possible for Danessa Myricks Beauty, but Sephora has also committed to creating this same opportunity for more female-founded, Black-owned brands as well,” Myricks shares. 

I’m personally stover excited about the prospect of more makeup enthusiasts catching wind of Danessa Myricks Beauty and trying out the line for themselves. Read on to learn about every DMB product that became available at sephora.com as of their launch date, February 26.

Colorfix 24-Hour Cream Color ($18)

These multipurpose cream pigments allow you to create some seriously vibrant, out-of-the-world looks (see above for proof). And the best of news of all: The brand has confirmed that all 83 shades and finishes — Creams, Mattes, Foils, Glazes, Neons, and Nudes — will be eventually be available to shop on Sephora. (For the initial launch, there are 30 shades to dive in on.)

If you don’t know where to start, Myricks recommends a monochromatic look. “With just one drop, you can take your favorite shade and add it to your lips, cheeks, and eyelids,” she says. (Just look at your favorite celebrities, such as Yara Shahidi, for inspiration.) The intense pigmentation works on every skin tone and lasts all day, Myricks adds.

“I think the number-one unexpected way Colorfix is used is as a complexion product,” Myricks says. Colorfix in shades like Phoenix (matte bright orange) and Carrot Top (neon orange) are crease-proof fixes for dark circles and hyperpigmentation. “The tiniest drop immediately neutralizes darkness and sets without bleeding into foundation or concealer,” she adds.

Vision Cream Cover ($28)

Sephora is known to offer tons of product exclusives in the form of jumbo sizes, pop-culture collaborations, and holiday gift sets, so it’s no surprise that Danessa Myricks Beauty is kicking off its Sephora partnership with an exclusive of its own: a value-size version of the Vision Cream Cover for $22 (normally $28). 

“With over 20 years of experience as a makeup artist, one thing I know for sure is everyone wants to look natural, regardless of their coverage needs,” Myricks says. This foundation-concealer hybrid has easily adjustable, sheer-to-full coverage available in 23 shades and six color transformer/additive colors for further customization (i.e. peach to neutralize redness). Infused with moisture-boosting squalane and soothing vitamin E, it glides onto skin like a dream and leaves behind a silky-smooth finish.

You only need one drop of the creamy formula for full-face coverage or a half-drop if you’re using it as a concealer, Myricks says. You can also sheer out the Vision Cream Cover with a hydrating lotion or lightweight oil. As far as application goes, you can play with it however you like. “It’s so finger-friendly but also works beautifully with a sponge or a brush,” she adds.

Dew Wet Balm ($22)

If you’re looking for an instant “glass skin” finish on the fly, Dew Wet Balm will dew that with a single swipe. Available in five luminescent colors (including translucent, rose gold, and bronze), this highlighting balm sinks into skin, rather than simply sitting atop of it. That effect is due to the formula’s hydrating jojoba oil, which lends skin a natural glow. You could say it’s the highlight of 2021 makeup trends.

Vision Flush ($20)

Similar to Colorfix, Vision Flush can also be applied all over the eyes, lips, and cheeks for a subtle, satin-matte wash of color. Choose from 12 shades — including corals, plums, and browns — and sweep the diamond-shaped reservoir tip applicator across your lips or dab onto your lids and cheekbones. Voilà, radiance in a pinch.

Illuminating Veil ($22)

Tap the Illuminating Veil for backup if you want to add major glimmer to your face or body. Whether you wear it on its own or mix it in with your favourite liquid foundation for a dewy finish, this water-based highlighter makes all skin tones glow in no time at all. If you’re short on time, you can effortlessly blend in any of the 12 bronzey, golden, silver, and lavender shades in with your fingers.

Power Bronzer ($26)

An alternative to cakey powder bronzers, the Power Bronzer is a long-wearing cream bronzer that’s impossibly easy to blend and adds a dimensional dose of warmth to your face. All three shades (Deep, Medium, and Light) are perfect for achieving a summery glow — even when you’re stuck indoors all winter long.

Evolution Powder ($24)

Designed with the harshness of flash photography and TV/film lighting in mind, the Evolution Powder blurs the appearance of texture and fine lines with light-diffusing spheres. Dust on a layer of the translucent setting powder or any of the eight tinted shades (including yellow, peach, tan, and bronze) to set your makeup with ease and guard against mid-day shine. 

Hot tip: Sweep the powder in only the areas you experience excess oil with a small makeup brush (aka, precision powdering) if you don’t want to lose your all-over glow.

Light Work Palette I & II ($42)

The Light Work Palettes allow you to layer various highlighting shades so you obtain the exact level of brilliance you desire. Both palettes have six creamy powder shades each, but the “I” edition has cooler rose gold, champagne, gold, and soft white shades, while “II” has a warmer color scheme that incorporates yellow gold, terracotta bronze, cocoa bronze hues. Both, however, contain micro-light-refracting particles that add eye-catching dimension to your face.

Beauty Oil ($30)

Even though it’s spiked with deeply hydrating jojoba, sunflower, and walnut oils, you’ll find the Beauty Oil still manages to be lightweight to the touch. The clear, gold-flecked liquid sinks into skin within seconds to reveal your skin’s natural radiance when it’s worn alone as a skin-care product, underneath complexion products, and mixed with your foundation of choice (just two to three drops will do). It’s especially handy for mature skin.

What are you waiting for? Stock up on all things Danessa Myricks at sephora.com (and in-stores on April 9), and keep your eyes peeled for new and special drops.

ALLURE article

10 Breathtaking Eye MakeUp Looks From The Vogue Archive – And How To Recreate Them At Home

At a time when mask-wearing is de rigueur, it’s no surprise that, where makeup is concerned, our attention has turned to enhancing the eyes. The distracting, spirit-lifting power of exploring new looks should not be underestimated, and from lashes to lids, and even temples, options abound.

Val Garland, makeup artist and Vogue contributing beauty editor, agrees. “Now the eye area has become our focus, it’s all about liner, lashes and brows,” she says, before singling out the graphic look of the 1960s. “Get your flick on, but switch the black and brown for navy or rich forest-green. Perfect your brows and flutter your lashes with mega volume – the strong nature of this makeup is what makes it so appealing.”

The Vogue archive holds a wealth of inspiration for looks to emulate, so here, for your delectation, is an illustrated retrospective highlighting creative expression through makeup. Look to those graphic ’60s looks, the abandon of the 1970s, the freewheeling freedom of the 1980s or the makeup magic of the modern day. This is your ultimate moodboard – and it’s a place where imagination knows no limits.

Singular Stroke

Carl “Eric” Erickson, 1935

One of the earlier illustrative examples of eye makeup in Vogue, this now iconic image serves as a reminder to never forget the drama of a single sweep of colour.

Angelic Eyes

Barry Lategan, 1974

Legendary makeup artist Barbara Daly created this heavenly look, applying frosted blue “halos” around the eyes to ethereal effect.

Get the look: try Mac Cosmetics Eyeshadow in Tilt, £16 – and remember, the more exaggerated the application, the better. 

Moonage Daydream

David Bailey, 1966

Model Celia Hammond looks out of this world thanks to makeup artist Pablo Manzoni. When an image is simultaneously nostalgic and futuristic, the results are timeless.

Get the look: use YSL Beauty Sequin Crush Eyeshadow in Empowered Silver, £27, to create silver moons on the eyelids, then frame with full-on lashes for a 1960s throwback. 

Colour Play

Tyen, 1990

Photographer and makeup design director Tyen is a master of colour. This 31-year-old kaleidoscopic approach still fires up the imagination.

Get the look: use Nars Cool Crush Eyeshadow Palette, £56, as the starting point for this incredible multifaceted look. 

Rainbow Babe

Steve Lovi, 1969

Marsha Hunt looks on the bright side, courtesy of makeup artist Sammy Lopez.

Get the look: try multicoloured arcs of eyeliner using different shades from Dior Diorshow On Stage Liner collection, £27.50 each, for a modern-day interpretation. 

Life Imitating Art

John Swannell, 1980

Follow Barbara Daly’s illustrative approach with swooshes and sweeps of differing tones around the eyes.

Get the look: go for the most vivid colour combinations that you dare. Consider the painterly shades in Lancôme’s La Rose Eyeshadow Palette, £45, for inspiration. 

Striking Eyes 

David Bailey, 1966

This iconic cover image of Donyale Luna – the first Black model to appear on the cover of British Vogue – called for the powerful statement of dramatic eyeliner.

Get the look: trace Estée Lauder Little Black Liner, £24, along the lash line, and be sure to elongate the shape for that super-sleek effect.

The Pat Effect

Steven Meisel, 2017

Influenced by the makeup of the 1970s, Pat McGrath, Vogue’s beauty editor-at-large, created this shimmering aquatic moment on model Adwoa Aboah for Edward Enninful’s inaugural edition as editor-in-chief.

Get the look: sweep and blend the cooler tones from Pat McGrath Labs Mothership I: Subliminal Palette, £120, to surround the eyes.

Peepers Show

Helmut Newton, 1966

Grace Coddington, now a British Vogue contributing fashion editor, stars as the muse for this portrait, which sees maxi lashes and exaggerated winged liner take centre stage (with hair by Christopher at Vidal Sassoon).

Get the look: layer up an excess of Gucci Mascara L’Obscur, £40, on both top and bottom lashes, tracing in extra lashes on the lower line for added drama.

Beady Eyes

Norman Parkinson, 1965

Why not look to sequins and pearls to accessorise the lower lash line, like model Marika Green? Appliqué accents instantly prettify any makeup.

VOGUE article

Olivia Wilde’s Makeup Artist Uses This Genius Hack To Keep Eyeliner From Smearing

Finding an eyeliner that stays put it is no easy feat, even among those marketed as long-wearing or waterproof. That difficulty gets heightened a thousand-fold (no pun intended) when you’re trying to do makeup for hooded eyes, where a bit of skin hangs down over your eyelid crease and makes your eye makeup transfer with a single blink. But according to celebrity makeup artist Gita Bass, who counts Olivia Wilde and Elizabeth Olsen as clients, this annoying makeup issue has an easy fix. 

On Instagram Bass posted an incredibly simple way to make eyeliner last on hooded eyelids. Her caption begins: “When you spend four hours doing liquid eyeliner because you can’t see close up without your glasses anymore, and then your liner transfers to your lids because they are hooded, and gravity is pulling them down!! Aaahh!!!”

And then the magic happens. Bass whips out a small brush and dabs it onto the wand of Hourglass’s clear Arch Brow Shaping Gel, then uses the brush to go over her majestic winged liner. She explains, “This is an amazing hack to help set the liner,” but cautions to only do it once you’re happy with the liner’s shape, because once it’s set, the line is hard to manipulate (a good thing). 

Shop now: $28; ulta.com

The technique is genius, leaving Debra Messing in the comments wondering, “Why didn’t you tell me!?!?” and others saying they’re going to try the tip because they face the exact same problem. On Reddit, the “Makeup for Hooded Eyes” forum counts 17,320 subscribers, where the issue is a common thread of discussion. One person writes, “I honestly got rid of all of my liquid liners because I couldn’t find a way to make it work for me,” while others have sworn off the liner category altogether.   

Bass’s easy hack might be the path to revolution, especially if you opt for the Hourglass gel she mentions. On Ulta, shoppers write that it’s miraculous for lasting all day, and never flakes or makes your brows feel stiff, benefits that definitely transfer to its liner-setting use. 

Shop now: $4; ulta.com

If you need something to apply it with, Morphe’s $4 angled brush racks up raves for being soft but strong, universally approved for both liner and brow use. And if you layer something like Stila’s Stay All Day Waterproof Liquid Eyeliner or Hourglass liner Bass uses with the gel, rest assured the combo’s not coming off for hours. Welcome back to the eyeliner fold — pun slightly intended.  

INSTYLE article

12 Korean Beauty Trends To Try In 2021

Snail mucin. Bee venom. Glass skin. These are just some of the beauty trends to emerge from South Korea in the past five years. Whether you’ve dabbled in a bit of donkey milk (good for rejuvenating the skin with protein and fatty acids) or you’ve played it safe with a weekly face mask, K-beauty is everywhere. In fact, Allied Market Research says that by 2026, the K-beauty market will be worth an estimated $21 billion. According to Jenni Middleton, director of beauty at trend forecasting company WGSN, “During the coronavirus pandemic, consumers searched more for K-beauty, looking for innovative products to add to their lockdown beauty regimes.”

Like most cultural phenomena, K-beauty is ever-changing—what was big last year may not be as popular this year. As Middleton observes, we’re seeing the traditional 10-step routine give way to a more minimalist approach as conscious consumers react against fast fashion and excessive packaging. Elsewhere, playful gimmicks such as color-changing effects or jellylike substances are being passed over in favor of science-backed formulas.

1. Hanbang ingredients

Hanbang ingredients are traditional herbal ingredients used in Korean medicines and they’ve long been a staple in Korean life. For example, ginseng root, houttuynia cordata, sacred lotus, and rehmannia boast antiaging, anti-inflammation, and regenerative properties.

2. Acid layering

K-beauty has been incorporating more acid into its products, but with a gentle approach that focuses on striking the balance: Too much can irritate and aggravate your skin, too little will yield no results, so products with an optimal amount is key. Use the right balance of AHAs and BHAs (plant and animal-derived acids) to gently exfoliate dead skin cells and smooth skin texture.

3. Carrot seed oil

Carrot seed oil is an unsung hero at the moment, although it has been used in K-beauty for more than 10 years. It contains vitamin A and is a great antioxidant. It’s antiaging, antifungal, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory—so it’s ideal for anyone looking to brighten up their skin.

4. Gentle retinol

K-beauty’s ‘skin first’ approach will continue through 2021, especially given that self-care and skin care are so important right now. There’s no denying retinol’s powerful antiaging properties, but the K-beauty approach uses a lower percentage, so the skin stays healthier and less irritated. Retinol is highly efficacious without causing unnecessary damage.

5. Centella asiatica

[The year] 2021 is less about what’s ‘buzzy’ and more about what’s tried-and-true, with a focus on calming the skin. Centella asiatica [an herb grown in Asia, known for being anti-inflammatory]—or ‘cica’—is huge right now. With everyone dealing with the prolonged stress of the pandemic and dreaded ‘maskne,’ soothing irritated, angry skin seems to be at the forefront of people’s minds. Cica is the ingredient that everyone wants to add to their routine.

6. Clean beauty

More brands are developing products free of chemical additives, artificial ingredients, and fragrance. Products will be even more gentle with effective plant-based ingredients, and many brands are becoming vegan as well. Consumers are more aware of what they put on their skin.

7. Pre-, pro-, and postbiotics

This year, inner and outer wellness brands and products will gain more popularity. For example, brands that focus on pre-, pro-, and postbiotics; microbiome-friendly skin care; and consumable supplements, which benefit both the skin and the gut.

“K-beauty will shift more towards a holistic approach, linking skin care and internal health. I take probiotic supplements for my bouts of eczema and I love using K-beauty products with fermented ingredients. I regularly use 107—it uses aged [seven- and 10-year-old] vinegar [that promotes good gut health]. Their vinegar tastes delicious with honey!”

8. Flexible minimalism

A few years back, we were oversaturated with the ‘10-step Korean skin-care routine.’ The ‘skin-care diet’ [using fewer products and steps] that followed was a pushback against that, but it was too restrictive for those who wanted more results than could be attained with just the basics.

Flexible minimalism is a focus on clean and simple product lines, which makes customizing your routine easier. There will also be a push towards pared-back lists of ingredients. Single and minimal ingredients are appealing because of their simplicity and high concentration of the hero component.

9. At-home indulgences

Skin care has a functional element—it has to work and deliver results—but I expect products that provide meditative, soothing, and spa-like moments to take off in a big way. They can transport you mentally and emotionally to another headspace.

10. Hyphenate and hybrid skin care

We’ve started seeing ‘skipcare’ as a K-beauty trend, where the focus is on a pared-down, simple, and minimalist routine. We will be seeing more efficient and effective multitasking and versatile products—what we like to call ‘hyphenates’ or ‘hybrid’ skin care.

11. Skin detoxifying and barrier strengthening

“The belief that ‘skin is a reflection of your mental state’ comes from Korea, and growing up, my mother emphasized this to me many times. We’ll see more barrier-strengthening ingredients that boost immunity, such as mushrooms, plus detoxifying herbs including mugwort and ginger. Ceramides [which form a protective layer to help prevent moisture loss and visible skin damage] will make a comeback too.”

12. A boost in body care

In Korea, many body-care rituals originate from the bathhouse culture, where milk treatments are slathered on the face and body, and baths are steeped with skin-beneficial ingredients, such as green tea and probiotics. During a difficult year, personal self-care has taken on new importance for many, so we expect to see the definition to include all of the skin, from head to toe.

VOGUE article

Lisa Eldridge Has The Best Tip To Keep Your Lipstick From Smudging Under Your Face Mask And More…

When celebs like Dua Lipa, Alexa Chung, and Kate Winslet want makeup looks that will standout on the red carpet, they all turn to renowned makeup artist Lisa Eldridge.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #40 series on my blog.

But Eldridge’s influence doesn’t stop at her impressive client list. For over 20 years, she’s been the mastermind behind the makeup in the fashion campaigns of  brands like Gucci and Prada, wrote a best-selling book, and was one of the fist professional makeup artists to embrace YouTube, with a number of her tutorials going viral.

In-between applying makeup, Eldridge has worked with a number of top beauty brands on product development, including Chanel and Shiseido, to name a few. Currently, she’s the global creative director of Lancôme. (You can thank her for the game-changing bendable Grandiôse Liquid Eyeliner.)

After years of crafting hero products for other brands, Eldridge launched her namesake makeup line in 2018 with a single product: lipstick.

The velvet-inspired matte formulas quickly became cult-favorites, and Eldridge has recently launched nourishing, but high-pigment lip glosses, which sold out also immediately.

Here, Eldridge shares the inspiration behind her own lip products, her tips for preventing your lipstick from smudging under a face mask, and more.

At what point in your career did you know you wanted to start your own brand? 

I spent a long time working with labs and cosmetic scientists while consulting and developing for them. I really enjoyed doing it and all of the companies I was working with were very complimentary about how good I was with the scientists and putting everything all together. I had it in the back of my mind that I wanted to do it. However, I’m not a big planner and things usually happen organically for me, which is what happened with my lipsticks as well.

How did your experiences as a makeup artist shape your own brand? 

I think I’m well-placed as someone who does tutorials, but also does makeup every day on different faces and skin tones. My experience of handling makeup and seeing makeup in motion gives me a double side.

Why did you decide to launch with lipsticks? 

The funny thing about cosmetic science is that products can often take years to develop. While I have other things coming, some of which I’ve been working on for such a long time, the lipsticks just happened to be ready first. I had the idea to make this velvety lipstick, and we tried once before and it didn’t work. We finally found a way to get the lipsticks out of the mold and still look like velvet. It was a challenge, and I had to put a lot of quality control in place, with people checking every single bullet. I was 100% satisfied, so I was happy with launching it. Since it’s only me, I’m not under pressure to launch on a certain date or month, whether the product is ready or not, which is quite a luxury.

You recently came out with lip glosses. What was the inspiration behind this launch? 

While my matte lipstick formula isn’t drying, I wanted to do something that was more moisturizing. I had the idea of creating a product that feels like a lip treatment, but still offers a lot of color. We tried different formulas and we were happy with this one, along with the colors. Sometimes things come quite quickly, and other times things will take years. And by quickly, I mean within 18 months.

This year has been weird for wearing lipstick, among many other things. Where do you see lipstick trends going in the time of COVID-19? 

I planned to do lips again so I was a bit concerned about the face masks. But, lipstick has been just as popular as ever. There’s always that lipstick effect, which is a historically proven thing, where people like to cheer themselves up with a bold lip color. I thought people would stick to more natural colors, but my red shades have been super popular this year. Velvet Dragon, which is a new red shade, has just flown. A lot of people send me photos and videos showing me the lipstick they’re wearing under their masks. A lot of doctors and nurses wear my lipsticks. They show me they’re wearing a really bright red lipstick under all of their PPE. I think it’s like a secret thing that’s quite cheerful and brings a lot of joy.

What are your tips for preventing lipstick from getting on your face mask? 

Stick to thin layers. When you put thin layers on, the lipstick will bond in synergy with the skin. Sometimes if you put a lot on from the bullet, there’s a certain amount that’s sitting on top of the skin. I always say to start with a thin layer — maybe with a lip brush — so that it almost settles in the creases on the lip. Then, put another thin layer on top and tap it in with your finger or blot it with a tissue. You’ll still feel the creaminess on the surface, but you won’t have any excess product available to come off.

What is a common mistake people make when applying lipstick? 

The shape you make — especially with strong colors — is important unless you have completely balanced lips. For example, I have downturned lips, like a lot of people do, and if you follow your lips all the way down to the corners of the mouth, it tends to make you look miserable and sad. My tip is to roughly following your natural lips when you fill them in and just stand back and look into the mirror. Take a lip pencil and add a little bit of bulk or use a Q-tip to take a bit off one side, as needed. You’ll look like a different person. It’s a really subtle tweak, but you need to look at your lip shape and see what suits you.

Shop Lisa Eldridge’s Lip Products:

True Velvet Lip Colour in Velvet Ribbon

Inspired by a classic bow, this true neutral/blue red is highly pigmented with a matte finish that has a slight sheen to it. To sum it up: it’s a bold shine-free lipstick that won’t dry out your lips.

To shop: $35; lisaeldridge.com.

Velvet Myth Fantasy Florals Lip Kit

A rich berry is a gorgeous alternative to a red lip. This kit includes the True Velvet Lipstick, along with the coordinating Enhance and Define Beauty Liner, a creamy gel lip pencil, and Gloss Embrace Lip Gloss, a non-sticky formula that offers impressive color payoff while simultaneously nourishing the lips. The trio comes in a velvet floral pouch created by multimedia artist Jon Jacobson. It’s a great gift for the lipstick lover in your life, or you know, yourself.

To shop: $84; lisaeldridge.com.

Gloss Embrace Lip Gloss in Blush

This multitasking formula offers leaves lips smooth and soft, thanks to a blend of nourishing ingredients, while offering high-pigment color. Blush, along with the other five shades are currently sold out, but you can subscribe to Eldridge’s mailing list for restock alerts

To shop: $24; lisaeldridge.com.

The Blue Velvet Collection

What’s better than treating yourself to a single lipstick? Three new colors. This set comes with three blue-based shades of Eldridge’s True Velvet Lip Colour. There are also options available with warm undertones as well as bold and neutral.

To shop: $104; lisaeldridge.com.

INSTYLE article

3 Pretty Spring Beauty Trends From Bobbi Brown’s New Global Artistic Director

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #39 series on my blog.

There are few makeup bags that haven’t, at some point, been graced by a Bobbi Brown product. A brand that puts making women feel (as well as look) good at its core, 16th of January marked the 30th anniversary of its inception. To celebrate such a lengthy time in the beauty industry, the brand has, excitingly, appointed makeup artist Hannah Murray as global artistic director.

“Bobbi Brown is a brand I’ve loved since I started as a makeup artist,” Murray tells Vogue over the phone. “It’s such a well-loved global brand, and we have very similar philosophies regarding embracing natural beauty and individuality, as well as empowering women. These are things I’ve been championing for a while so it feels like a very natural fit.” Take a peek at Murray’s Instagram page, and you’ll see image after image of luminous skin, playful details around the eyes and bold brows on models and celebrities alike. Her makeup is real, fresh, and a far cry from the heavy contouring and airbrushed skin that have become popular in the last few years.

All of which makes her an excellent fit at a brand known for its feature-enhancing (rather than covering) products, where she will be overseeing everything from the fashion shows Bobbi Brown sponsors and campaigns, to education and product development. She has had experience with the latter before, having worked on the (rather brilliant) Topshop beauty line when it launched in 2011.

“I’m essentially going to be the visual voice of the brand, and I think with everything that’s been happening in the world, it’s a really pivotal moment to see things with fresh eyes and build on Bobbi Brown’s heritage,” she says. “I’ve lived in New York for the last 10 years, and before that in London, and I very much understand both the American aesthetic and the European sensibility and aesthetic too – it will be interesting to see that merge, something I think will give the brand a freshness, too.” When it comes to new products, we can expect some “innovation, excitement and fun”.

Though she isn’t, like many of us, forced to sit on Zoom all day, Murray is keenly aware of the “giving, giving, giving” that is endless, exhausting meetings, and believes in the power of beauty – whether that’s pampering your skin or applying some mascara – to uplift a mood. “There’s something ritualistic about [skincare and makeup]. Just like fresh air and eating well, having five to 10 minutes to yourself to cleanse, put a mask on, massage your skin is so healing. I have a three-year-old boy, so grabbing those moments is grounding. We all need to take care of ourselves and have a bit of me time.”

As for the beauty trends she expects to be big this year? Here she shares three of her key predictions.

Spa skin

“Instead of applying 10 products just to walk out of the door [like we used to], it’s now about feeding your skin and making it feel fresh and juicy and plump and alive. That’s a feeling thing, as well as being about how you look, and it’s using texture rather than product. You can layer on balms – I often dab Bobbi Brown’s gorgeous Lip Balm on cheekbones as it really makes skin look alive, like spa-fresh skin.”

“I’m hoping we’ve moved on from baking and cut creases – I want to see skin, feel it, and let it breathe. Another of my favourite products is the Bobbi Brown Extra Illuminating Moisture Balm, which is a lightweight moisturiser that imparts a subtle pearlescent finish for a “flawless, hyper-real skin effect”.

Outdoor glow

“I think everyone now wants to look healthy, like they’ve been outdoors and not stuck indoors for three months! I’m thinking the beauty of a real flushed cheek and freckles.” Try the brand’s Pot Rouge, a buttery-soft cream blush which melts into skin seamlessly for a natural finish.

’90s minimalism

“Take cues from the ’90s and apply eyeliner to your waterline to tight-line around the eye. It gives a bit of definition but it’s not laboured over. Makeup should do the work for you, you want to wear products that are smart, easy to use and that work well for you.”

VOGUE article

France Becomes The First EU Country To Bypass China’s Animal Testing

Cruelty-free brands are having a moment. New exemptions outlined in China’s latest Cosmetic Supervision and Administration Regulation update mean that certain products can now enter the country without undergoing animal testing on arrival. These “ordinary” or “general use” cosmetics include mascara, shampoo, and fragrances. 

France has become the first European country to qualify for these exonerations. The National Agency for the Safety of Medicines and Health Products (ANSM) has developed a dedicated platform in France to enable its manufacturers to obtain the necessary certificates and approvals for easier access to the mainland. Other EU countries are now racing to devise their own frameworks to meet the update and see their brands follow suit with easier access to China. 

China has agreed to drop its animal testing requirement for imported cosmetics as long as manufacturers can provide a certificate of conformity confirming that the product complies with various manufacturing and product safety standards.

The French health authorities have risen to the challenge and are now in a position to issue this document, ahead of their European equivalents.  

Animal testing is a contentious practice and has long proven a barrier to selling in China for EU companies. As Patrick O’Quin, FEBEA President explains,

“We are delighted with this progress, which rewards several years of efforts made with the Chinese authorities. The cosmetics sector is the only one to have completely banned animal testing in Europe, and we are happy to continue to develop regulations in other parts of the world. This agreement will also allow French cosmetic companies to export under new conditions to China. This country is today our second trading partner.”

COSMETICSBUSINESS article
JINGDAILY article
GLOBALCOSMETICSNEWS article