Don’t Panic, But This Legendary Under-Eye Brightener Is Being Discontinued

I never thought I would be writing this. Becca Cosmetics, sweet, darling Becca, which ignited the highlighter craze with its best-selling shimmers, is soon to be no more. On Instagram, the brand announced that due to COVID-19, it would be closing up shop at the end of September 2021, leaving fans scrambling to stock up on their go-tos. And one thing in particular has already sold out in multiple places: Becca’s legendary darkness-cancelling Under Eye Brightening Corrector.

“I drove 40 miles to an Ulta and bought three because all the other Ultas closest to me were out of stock,” one person on Reddit says. Another describes the peachy pink concealer-corrector hybrid as brightening in a way that “makes it almost more ‘good lighting angle on a date’ than makeup or concealer. It takes several years off my age.” 

Shop now: $32; sephora.comdermstore.com, and qvc.com

Working through the gut punch of losing it, shoppers regrouped on makeup forums to recommend replacements for the beloved product, which has earned almost 130,000 loves on Sephora’s website for its life-giving, appearance-of-sleep-bequeathing power. The only silver lining is that thanks to Becca popularizing the concept, there are now ample successors ready to carry on the mantle of its good name — no two-hour venture necessary. 

Bobbi Brown’s Bisque Corrector comes with high recommendations, correcting dark circles “like a charm” with a hydrating consistency that doesn’t settle into creases. The “miracle product” balances out even super deep circles on skin tones across the spectrum, shoppers say, and it’s so good that people are on their 15th (!) restock. Per the perma-fan, the pink shade also erases circles so well, they look years younger.

Shop now: $29; amazon.com

Pixi’s Brightening Peach Correction Concentrate comes in strong as a more affordable option, cancelling out blue circles on Amazon insomniacs and creating a “supernaturally” rested look. A mom of three boys explains that nothing was able to cover her circles until a makeup artist friend recommended the Pixi — which works “like magic” and stays on all day. 

The Pixi concealer is already on backorder from third-party Amazon stockists, so as a backup Tarte’s CC undereye corrector is similarly praised, its creamy texture covering with ease. One Dermstore shopper writes that it was the hydrating pot of gold at the end of their “eternal journey” for a corrector able to best their “awful,” multi-colored under-eye circles.

Shop now: $12; walgreens.com

Shop now: $25; dermstore.com

At the lowest price point, L.A. Girl’s peach Pro Conceal grabs over 8,000 five-star Amazon ratings. Shoppers write that they’re shocked at how well it blends and conceals without drying out crepey under eyes, besting even products that are 10 times as expensive. It gives the same inner-eye sheen as the Becca, and likewise transforms from a bright peach in the tube to a corrector that masks hereditary dark circles completely.

Shop now: $4 (Originally $5); amazon.com

All great options, but if you’re not ready to say goodbye yet, there are a dwindling handful of places with Becca’s pearlized originals still in stock. It’s fresh out at Ulta, but Sephora still has one of the two shades, and Dermstore and QVC haven’t been ransacked yet. Happy hunting. 

INSTYLE article

12 Korean Beauty Trends To Try In 2021

Snail mucin. Bee venom. Glass skin. These are just some of the beauty trends to emerge from South Korea in the past five years. Whether you’ve dabbled in a bit of donkey milk (good for rejuvenating the skin with protein and fatty acids) or you’ve played it safe with a weekly face mask, K-beauty is everywhere. In fact, Allied Market Research says that by 2026, the K-beauty market will be worth an estimated $21 billion. According to Jenni Middleton, director of beauty at trend forecasting company WGSN, “During the coronavirus pandemic, consumers searched more for K-beauty, looking for innovative products to add to their lockdown beauty regimes.”

Like most cultural phenomena, K-beauty is ever-changing—what was big last year may not be as popular this year. As Middleton observes, we’re seeing the traditional 10-step routine give way to a more minimalist approach as conscious consumers react against fast fashion and excessive packaging. Elsewhere, playful gimmicks such as color-changing effects or jellylike substances are being passed over in favor of science-backed formulas.

1. Hanbang ingredients

Hanbang ingredients are traditional herbal ingredients used in Korean medicines and they’ve long been a staple in Korean life. For example, ginseng root, houttuynia cordata, sacred lotus, and rehmannia boast antiaging, anti-inflammation, and regenerative properties.

2. Acid layering

K-beauty has been incorporating more acid into its products, but with a gentle approach that focuses on striking the balance: Too much can irritate and aggravate your skin, too little will yield no results, so products with an optimal amount is key. Use the right balance of AHAs and BHAs (plant and animal-derived acids) to gently exfoliate dead skin cells and smooth skin texture.

3. Carrot seed oil

Carrot seed oil is an unsung hero at the moment, although it has been used in K-beauty for more than 10 years. It contains vitamin A and is a great antioxidant. It’s antiaging, antifungal, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory—so it’s ideal for anyone looking to brighten up their skin.

4. Gentle retinol

K-beauty’s ‘skin first’ approach will continue through 2021, especially given that self-care and skin care are so important right now. There’s no denying retinol’s powerful antiaging properties, but the K-beauty approach uses a lower percentage, so the skin stays healthier and less irritated. Retinol is highly efficacious without causing unnecessary damage.

5. Centella asiatica

[The year] 2021 is less about what’s ‘buzzy’ and more about what’s tried-and-true, with a focus on calming the skin. Centella asiatica [an herb grown in Asia, known for being anti-inflammatory]—or ‘cica’—is huge right now. With everyone dealing with the prolonged stress of the pandemic and dreaded ‘maskne,’ soothing irritated, angry skin seems to be at the forefront of people’s minds. Cica is the ingredient that everyone wants to add to their routine.

6. Clean beauty

More brands are developing products free of chemical additives, artificial ingredients, and fragrance. Products will be even more gentle with effective plant-based ingredients, and many brands are becoming vegan as well. Consumers are more aware of what they put on their skin.

7. Pre-, pro-, and postbiotics

This year, inner and outer wellness brands and products will gain more popularity. For example, brands that focus on pre-, pro-, and postbiotics; microbiome-friendly skin care; and consumable supplements, which benefit both the skin and the gut.

“K-beauty will shift more towards a holistic approach, linking skin care and internal health. I take probiotic supplements for my bouts of eczema and I love using K-beauty products with fermented ingredients. I regularly use 107—it uses aged [seven- and 10-year-old] vinegar [that promotes good gut health]. Their vinegar tastes delicious with honey!”

8. Flexible minimalism

A few years back, we were oversaturated with the ‘10-step Korean skin-care routine.’ The ‘skin-care diet’ [using fewer products and steps] that followed was a pushback against that, but it was too restrictive for those who wanted more results than could be attained with just the basics.

Flexible minimalism is a focus on clean and simple product lines, which makes customizing your routine easier. There will also be a push towards pared-back lists of ingredients. Single and minimal ingredients are appealing because of their simplicity and high concentration of the hero component.

9. At-home indulgences

Skin care has a functional element—it has to work and deliver results—but I expect products that provide meditative, soothing, and spa-like moments to take off in a big way. They can transport you mentally and emotionally to another headspace.

10. Hyphenate and hybrid skin care

We’ve started seeing ‘skipcare’ as a K-beauty trend, where the focus is on a pared-down, simple, and minimalist routine. We will be seeing more efficient and effective multitasking and versatile products—what we like to call ‘hyphenates’ or ‘hybrid’ skin care.

11. Skin detoxifying and barrier strengthening

“The belief that ‘skin is a reflection of your mental state’ comes from Korea, and growing up, my mother emphasized this to me many times. We’ll see more barrier-strengthening ingredients that boost immunity, such as mushrooms, plus detoxifying herbs including mugwort and ginger. Ceramides [which form a protective layer to help prevent moisture loss and visible skin damage] will make a comeback too.”

12. A boost in body care

In Korea, many body-care rituals originate from the bathhouse culture, where milk treatments are slathered on the face and body, and baths are steeped with skin-beneficial ingredients, such as green tea and probiotics. During a difficult year, personal self-care has taken on new importance for many, so we expect to see the definition to include all of the skin, from head to toe.

VOGUE article