Jonathan Van Ness’s 5 Beauty Commandments To Live By

What’s that you hear? Beauty vloggers around the world shaking as Jonathan Van Ness enters the YouTube arena. Van Ness, the grooming expert on Queer Eye and host of his very own podcast “Getting Curious,” is joining the ranks of the mascara-wielding and palette swatching elites with the debut of his new YouTube channel entitled JVN Beauty. The industry vet (he’s been doing hair professionally for over ten years) will do what he does best— chop, curl, dye, and braid his hair and that of his family and friends. But, Van Ness wants to ensure us all that it doesn’t stop just there. The channel will cover all types of beauty, from skincare to wellness, with the ultimate goal of each viewer feeling seen in the content. 

Ahead of the launch, JVN sat down with ELLE.com to share a few of his beauty commandments. Plus, take an exclusive first look a the new channel above.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #92 series on my blog.

Always Have a Mantra Moment

As an added rite to combine inner and outer beauty, Van Ness turns to mantras. “You want to be present when you’re putting on your skincare. Often, it’s going into a positive affirmation, mantra moment where it’s like, I’d just be saying like, ‘Thank you body. Thank you for getting me through. Thank you for doing everything you’re doing.’

For Van Ness, celebrating skincare or hair rituals is more than just the end result. “Part of what makes you look beautiful is when you’re experiencing life and connected to your joy and your passion,” he says. “Sometimes, that’s not all skincare and haircare and makeup. Sometimes for me, it’s a lot of cats. It’s a lot of gardening. It’s a lot of figure skating and a lot of gymnastics.” Paired with therapy, a soothing beauty ritual works wonders for JVN’s mental health. “It’s a time where I’m giving myself a look over and just getting into gratitude and clearing my mind.

Go Back to Your Roots

Though Van Ness has become a pioneer in every sphere he enters, his background is behind the salon chair. “I want to share what I’ve learned. I did hair full time from the time I graduated from hair school in October of 2006 until April 2018. That five and six days a week for 12 years.” So be prepared for some high-quality hair content coming from JVN’s channel. “It’s been such a long time since I had my hands in hair. I was like, I miss doing hair, and I miss salon life. I miss talking about hair and thinking more about hair.

Slather On SPF 

No UVA or UVB rays are allowed in this house. Van Ness’ best skincare advice? Wear sunscreen every day. “The sun does not come into play anymore,” Van Ness warns. “I really, really, really love a gorgeous mineral based sunscreen because I just love that thick protective vibe that mineral sunscreen can give me. I love them. I also just got really into the powder sunscreen to refresh, so I don’t have to go over my skin with a cream every few hours outside, which I really wish that I would have used sooner.”

Invest In A Good Haircut

While some people may be horrified about a three-digit price tag on a haircut, for JVN a good haircut is like a wise investment. “I think that people that aren’t hairdressers do take for granted and don’t realize that especially if it’s a long layer haircut, like this 150 bucks, you shouldn’t need to get another haircut for six months. Really, it ends up being 150 divided by six. It’s like 30 bucks a month. Honey, it’s a fire sale.”

“Everyone Is Gorgeous”

Though he’s known for giving off-the-cuff beauty advice in his Instagram comment section, Van Ness hopes that this new medium will become a reference guide for all things haircare, skincare, and self-care. “I can’t wait to share it with everyone,” he tells ELLE.com. “Whether you’re like a brand new beauty beginner or you’re someone who has been into this for decades, I want there to be something that’s in there for everyone and a place for everyone to feel welcome and to learn.” 

JVN’s channel is dedicated to making sure everyone feels welcome and beautiful for anyone who feels like the beauty community has often had a narrow focus. “Everyone is gorgeous. I want everyone to know that they’re gorgeous.

ELLE

Revlon Files for Bankruptcy

The cosmetics giant is attempting to get out from under its heavy debt load amid soaring prices and a snarled supply chain.

Revlon has filed for bankruptcy protection as the cosmetic giant attempts to get out from under its heavy debt load amid soaring prices and supply chain disruptions.

The company said in a news release that it expects $575 million in financing if the plan wins court approval. The additional funds will support the company’s daily operations. Under the Chapter 11 filing, the company is able to continue operating while reorganizing its outstanding debt.

The 90-year-old multinational is known for an array of cosmetics and skin-care brands, including drugstore favorite Almay and premium label Elizabeth Arden, which Revlon acquired in 2016 after selling more than $2 billion of loans and bonds. It is controlled by billionaire Ronald Perelman’s MacAndrews & Forbes.

Before the coronavirus crisis, Revlon faced growing competition from start-ups backed by celebrities including Kylie Jenner’s Kylie Cosmetics and Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty, which siphoned many of its younger consumers through its social media marketing.

But the pandemic only exacerbated those problems as sales of lipsticks — Revlon’s iconic product — curtailed when people masked up. Worldwide net sales fell 20 percent, from $2.4 billion in 2019 to $1.9 billion a year later. In March 2020, Revlon cut 1,000 positions to improve profitability. In November of the same year, Revlon avoided a bankruptcy filing after receiving enough bondholder support.

Debra Perelman, Revlon’s chief executive and daughter of Ronald Perelman, said the company’s “challenging capital structure” has limited its ability to meet consumer demand while navigating “macroeconomic issues.”

By addressing these complex legacy debt constraints, we expect to be able to simplify our capital structure and significantly reduce our debt, enabling us to unlock the full potential of our globally recognized brands,” Perelman said.

Revlon estimated liabilities of between $1 billion to $10 billion in a court filing. In its most recent earnings report, the company reported $3.3 billion in long-term debt.

Revlon said it’s unable to keep a regular supply of raw materials, putting production at risk, according to the court filing. Nearly one-third of customer demand cannot be timely fulfilled due to the lack of raw materials, it added.

While Perelman said during the March earnings call that the supply chain head winds are “temporary” and that Revlon had sourced additional vendors for key materials, the war in Ukraine and the covid lockdown in China presented new challenges to the global supply chain. Shipping from China to the United States doubled in time and quadrupled in cost compared with 2019, the company said.

Experts said Revlon could take advantage of Chapter 11 provisions to reorganize its portfolio of brands, where some older ones showed unsatisfying performance and lost customers. “If executed effectively, Revlon could emerge from bankruptcy with a cleaner balance sheet and a better operating profile, improving longer term business prospects,” David Silverman, retail senior director at Fitch Ratings, told RetailDive in email comments.

Corporate bankruptcy filings have reached the lowest levels in early 2022, according to S&P Market Intelligence data, which excludes the smallest business filings. As of the end of May, 143 bankruptcies have been filed this year, compared with 203 in 2021 and 263 in 2020 during the same period. Among the 143 bankruptcies, only three are retail filings.

However, Revlon’s filing — the first from a major consumer-facing business in years — could signal a downturn in the consumer discretionary sector, which encompasses largely companies selling nonessential products and are sensitive to the business cycle.

In May, inflation reached 8.6 percent over the last year, which led to financial pressure felt by many households. According to Census Bureau data, retail sales are down 0.3 percent from the previous month in May, as consumers shift to cheaper alternatives amid rising prices.

WASHINGTON POST

Circular Beauty Can End the Industry’s Waste Problem

One only has to look as far as their own bathroom vanity to know that the beauty industry has a sustainability problem—generating a cited 120 billion units of waste annually of mostly plastic. This ugly truth about the multibillion dollar sector comes along with a bevy of alarming consequences related to ingredient sourcing, environmentally hazardous formulations, and wasteful distribution. For years, the industry status quo has been to prioritize profits in the midst of staunch competition, with beauty brands rapidly launching new products to keep up with the pace of mercurial trends. We know we can’t just recycle our way out of this mess.

But how’s this for hope? The eponymously named, New Zealand–based, luxury green beauty brand founded by Emma Lewisham is officially the first in the world to model a solution. In an unprecedented move, the brand has achieved a 100 percent circular business model, complete with carbon positive status, defying the global beauty market’s competitive environment by making the intellectual property public. “We genuinely want to see change,” Lewisham tells BAZAAR.com. “The problems we face are so much greater than the success of one business or brand, and if we are going to solve them, collaboration is key. We must tear down the barriers of competition once and for all. … This has to be the future of beauty.

This achievement garnered the written endorsement from Lewisham’s lifelong hero, the world-renowned environmentalist, ethologist, and a United Nations Messenger of Peace, Dr. Jane Goodall. “Emma Lewisham may be setting a new benchmark in beauty, but they are also setting a benchmark for how all industries should be operating—circular, waste free, and carbon positive. I wholeheartedly endorse Emma Lewisham’s Beauty Circle and all the systems they have put in place as a business striving to make the world a better place,” Goodall writes.

WHAT IS CIRCULAR BEAUTY?

The term refers to a green business model that keeps materials in use through repair and reuse, extends product life-cycle through quality, and purposely minimizes waste. “The beauty industry is currently built around the linear economic model, where we take from the earth, make something, then consumers throw it away. This take-make-waste system is responsible for an unprecedented amount of waste,” Lewisham says. “It may be appeasing profits, but it isn’t supporting the one thing we cannot live without: Earth.”

Being the first luxury beauty brand to achieve a circular model including carbon positivity meant undergoing an extensive process of research and development, collaborating with independent environmental organization agencies like Toitū Envirocare to track their carbon emissions at each stage of production. “It has been the result of many years of hard work and dedication by our team to get to this point,” she says. “Our circularity journey has been underway since inception and has been a labor of love and tenacity.” She adds that this meant investing heavily into the research and development of packaging, machinery, and business processes to allow for every product to be refilled, kept in use, and out of landfills.

REUSABLE, REFILLABLE PACKAGING

Achieving circularity relied heavily upon innovating packaging. “The single largest contributor of carbon emissions in the beauty industry is single-use packaging,” she says. “In mapping our carbon emissions, we have been able to prove that when buying our circularly designed refills—as opposed to brand-new packaging—carbon emissions are reduced by up to 74 percent.” It is important to Lewisham that we understand the significance of reusing packaging, via endlessly refillable containers, as opposed to recycling. “While recycling is part of circularity, reuse must always come first,” she notes. “Typically, refilling requires significantly less energy and resources, therefore emitting less greenhouse gases.”

More importantly, she points out that beauty recycling is not as streamlined of a process as we would like to believe. She notes that the recycling of beauty packaging requires specialized systems; it is simply not possible through typical curbside pickups. “Unless someone is prepared to cover the cost of having it recycled, it ends up either in landfills, scattered through our oceans, or burnt into greenhouse gases,” Lewisham explains. “If brands are to rely on the recyclability of their packaging, it is essential that they take responsibility for ensuring that it is actually recycled.

Further, the skincare entrepreneur is calling for an end to single-use beauty packaging. “After all, why would you invest time and resources into producing something that is inherently designed to be thrown away?” she asks. “And economically, surely, we should be reusing materials that we have invested in producing as opposed to sending them and their inherent value straight to a landfill.

CARBON POSITIVITY

Yet another aspect of Lewisham’s achievement has been going beyond carbon neutrality by becoming certified carbon positive. Carbon neutral is a status brands achieve when they track their carbon emissions (caused by resource use in production, transportation, creation, et cetera), and then removing the equivalent amount of carbon from the atmosphere, often through financial donations to offsetting agencies. But being carbon positive—also known as “carbon negative” or “climate positive” depending on the certifying agency—indicates that the brand is taking more carbon emissions out of the atmosphere than it puts in.

To become certified carbon positive, we worked with Toitū Envirocare, who are a world-leading independent environmental certification agency,” Lewisham says. “Over 12 months, we measured the carbon emissions emitted at each stage of our products’ life cycles, including growing, harvesting, transportation, product packaging, and end of life. This allowed us to clearly see where we could reduce carbon emissions and enabled us to implement an extensive carbon-reduction strategy as a first point of call.” It took work, but it created a new baseline of eco-responsibility for beauty brands to aspire to.

COLLABORATION OVER COMPETITION

The final step of Lewisham’s planet-friendly commitment has been making the fruits of their extensive labor—the Emma Lewisham Beauty Blueprint—public for other brands to follow suit. “Sharing our Beauty Blueprint wasn’t a decision I made lightly, as it is undoubtedly one of our brand’s competitive advantages,” Lewisham says. “However, none of it matters unless other brands join us on a circular and carbon positive path. … I hope that by sharing our Beauty Blueprint, other brands can capitalize on our innovation and investment to accelerate their transition to a circular and carbon positive model.

Poignantly, Lewisham points out that alone, the brand cannot hope to achieve the true shifts in the industry that she passionately hopes will come to pass for the sake of her young daughter. Her belief in the power and importance of collaboration is yet another area where Goodall commends the beauty entrepreneur. “I admire Emma Lewisham’s passion for creating lasting change,” Goodall writes. “Sharing their sustainability IP industry-wide is a powerful step, and I urge all brands to follow their lead. … This is when true change begins—when we work together.

VOTING WITH YOUR DOLLARS

In August, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned that human-wrought climate change through the emission of greenhouse gases was already “irreversible” for centuries to come, causing U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres to deem the IPCC’s findings “a code red for humanity.” Experts urged steps to limit greenhouse gas emissions in order for global temperatures to stabilize in two to three decades. How? By voluntarily prioritizing elements of inclusive and green economies—models characterized by low carbon emissions and efficient resource usage, and that are socially inclusive; in other words, circular.

As beauty consumers, we can take steps to consume less, waste less, reuse packaging (or recycle it responsibly). But for the purchases we do make, we can also vote with our dollars by supporting environmentally responsible brands that put their values into concrete actions. “New Zealand beauty brand Emma Lewisham is demonstrating what it means to be a truly sustainable business,” Goodall writes. “Through their carbon positive and circular business model, Emma Lewisham is creating environmental prosperity and showing their peers that this business model is not just possible but paramount if we are to make a meaningful difference.”

HARPER’S BAZZAR

What Does It Take For A Celebrity Beauty Brand To Succeed In 2021?

In November 2015, Kylie Jenner launched three lip kits. The kits, consisting of a lip pencil and liquid lipstick available in a pinky nude, a beige neutral and a deep brown, sold out almost immediately.

Jenner’s wasn’t the first celebrity beauty brand to launch. In 2009, Australian model Miranda Kerr founded Kora Organics, while actor Drew Barrymore launched Flower Cosmetics in 2013. But Jenner’s was the first to leverage the reach, engagement and influence of its founder in the social media era. Nearly six years later, the lip kits have evolved into a full makeup and skincare brand and in 2019, she sold 51 percent of her business (at a valuation of $1.2 billion) to Coty for $600 million.

The rise of celebrity beauty brands

Today, the legacy of Kylie Cosmetics—as well as Rihanna’s industry-changing Fenty Beauty, which launched in 2017—is everywhere, as celebrities jump on the beauty bandwagon. There’s Lady Gaga’s Haus Laboratories; Selena Gomez’s Rare Beauty; Kim Kardashian West’s KKW Beauty; Pharrell Williams’ Humanrace; Millie Bobby Brown’s Florence by Mills; Jennifer Lopez’s JLo Beauty; Halsey’s About-FaceVictoria Beckham; Paris Hilton’s Pro DNA, and many more.

Cardi B has teased a forthcoming makeup range, as has YouTuber James Charles, while Hailey Bieber, Gwen Stefani and Ariana Grande all reportedly filed trademarks for beauty products. Welcome to the golden age of the celebrity beauty brand.

It used to be that celebrities were the faces of beauty brands, starring in campaigns, endorsing the products in interviews and wearing the makeup on red carpets. But being the face is no longer enough—celebrities want ownership, becoming major players in the industry in their own right. And with the growth of the global beauty market over the last few years—the industry was valued at $532 billion in 2019—it’s not surprising.

“Celebrities are increasingly aware of the quick financial gains to be made, with the opportunity to monetize a loyal online fanbase and use their social media page as a marketing platform,” says Gabriella Beckwith, beauty consultant at market research firm Euromonitor.

But for everyone chasing a Fenty success story, fame and following alone won’t ensure sales. As the market becomes increasingly crowded, brands will have to rely on that notoriously slippery concept of authenticity to gain the trust and business of their target audience.

The power of authenticity

Today, beauty consumers have never been more educated about what they are putting on their face or more demanding about the quality. It’s why it matters that Pharrell Williams collaborated with his longtime dermatologist, Dr Elena Jones, for his skincare brand Humanrace. It’s why Halsey prefaced the announcement of her makeup brand About-Face in January by establishing her credibility. “Many of you know I’ve done my own makeup for a long time,” she wrote on Twitter. It’s also why actress Millie Bobby Brown drew criticism after posting a skincare tutorial in which she seemingly didn’t actually apply any of the products to her face. Brown issued an apology a few days later, writing, “I’m still learning the best way to share my routines as I get to know this space better—I’m not an expert.”

Eyebrows were also raised when Jennifer Lopez recently said that her age-defying skin was the mainly the result of years of olive oil use—despite selling a new line of skincare products (her multitasking serum costs $118). Followers were skeptical of these claims, with some even suggesting the singer had had Botox, to which Lopez responded: “For the 500 millionth time. I have never done Botox or any injectables or surgery!”

At the other end of the spectrum, Victoria Beckham established her credentials as a serious player by partnering with industry favorite Dr Augustinus Bader for her first skincare launch. “We tend to think of celebrity brands as inauthentic partnerships—traditionally, that is often what they were,” says Sarah Creal, co-founder and CEO of Victoria Beckham Beauty. “Celebrities can no longer slap their name on something and not have their communities realize that’s what’s happening. Those who are in it for the short term or inauthentically won’t last—consumers are savvy.”

A long-time beauty executive, Creal met Beckham at Estée Lauder, with whom the designer launched a capsule cosmetics collection, and was drawn to her passion and vision. While she says there is “no doubt” the former Spice Girl is a celebrity, they don’t consider Victoria Beckham Beauty a celebrity brand, but rather a bona fide indie startup. “Having Victoria as a partner obviously shines a light on the brand that we wouldn’t have otherwise, but we still have to stand up to the scrutiny and credibility that any new beauty brand would need to.”

The importance of quality over influence

Celebrities undeniably wield great influence over their following, but if they want to convince consumers to buy their products, this credibility and, most importantly, gold-standard quality, is non-negotiable. “People aren’t just buying into the face—they equally expect the product to work as hard as any other brand they’d engage with,” says Victoria Buchanan, senior futures analyst at strategic foresight consultancy The Future Laboratory.

The audience agrees. “[I think some] products by celebrities are bad quality because it is believed that people will buy them regardless,” says Marion, a 17-year-old gen-Z consumer from Toronto. “But the product itself should be more important than the celebrity or advertising.” It’s quality that she cites as the reason for buying the few products from celebrity brands that she’s purchased—a Rare Beauty highlighter with good reviews, a Fenty concealer because of its range of shades.

While a celebrity might make consumers aware of a brand (they’ll pay close attention if it’s someone they’re a fan of), it’s rare that they would buy a beauty product because of the name alone. On the whole, they remain wary of products, particularly when it comes to skincare, do their own research, and always listen to expert advice.

Like all trends, the celebrity beauty bubble will eventually burst. The sharp decline of celebrity fragrances following its 2011 peak shows what can happen when consumers move on from a category. Nothing lasts forever and we’ve already seen a gradual shift towards hair brands, such as Tracee Ellis Ross’s Pattern, Priyanka Chopra Jonas’s Anomaly, and sexual wellness products via Cara Delevingne and Dakota Johnson.

When that moment comes, those brands left standing will be the ones that have established their authenticity and credibility, played to the strengths of their creators’ personal ethos and identity, and, above all, proved their quality. As noisy and loud as your social media presence might be, in the end, nothing talks like results.

VOGUE article

“Biodegradable” Plastic Packaging Won’t Save The Beauty Industry From Itself

We know plastic is a big problem in the personal care industry. A look around your bathroom will tell you as much but to give some wider context, in its sustainability studies, L’Oréal estimates that packaging accounts for, on average, 50 percent of the environmental footprint of its products. 

It’s something that L’Oréal, and many of its peers in the beauty industry, is making moves to address. It seems every hour on the hour there’s a new brand or company pledging to get rid of superfluous packaging or to up its use of post-consumer recycled (PCR) plastic or to switch to other materials entirely, some of which they say are biodegradable. Those are often steps in the right direction, but in truth, we’re just scratching the surface. There’s still much to sort out and it’s all a bit confusing. 

Here, a look at the current, well, climate, plus guidance that can help lead you to the best possible purchasing decisions — because we should all be thinking of each one as a vote. “How we purchase things is more powerful than our political [moves],” says Tom Szaky, CEO of recycling giant TerraCycle. “When we buy certain things or don’t buy other things, it changes the world more aggressively and more quickly.” 

So, first, here is what to know about plastic packaging.

Plastic packaging is rarely recycled (yes, even when you do everything right).

So far, the big promise of recycling has largely failed us — only nine percent of the plastic is ever actually remade into something usable. One reason why: If you don’t clean that bottle or jar fully and remove all stickers, residue, etc., it will be rejected — and can even contaminate a whole batch of material sent for recycling, according to a report last year by GreenPeace

Looking for that little triangle of arrows on the bottom isn’t necessarily a slam dunk either. The reality is that only packaging with a 1 or 2 stamped in that triangle is going to be widely municipally recyclable. A quick experiment: Of five plastic-housed beauty products randomly selected from this writer’s medicine cabinet, two had no recycling symbol at all, one was a category 4, one was category 2 and the final was a 1.

But there’s even more to consider: For example, if a plastic pump includes metal (which almost all do), it can’t be processed. (This is something some brands like Love Beauty and Planet are addressing with new designs.) 

“Another uncommonly known fact is that dark plastics — such as black, navy, or dark brown — cannot often be seen by sorters in recycling facilities and so they end up in landfills,” says Sarah Dearman, vice president of circular ventures for The Recycling Partnership. Also a problem for sorters: small packaging. According to TerraCycle’s Szaky, nothing smaller than two-inches cubed is ever going to be recycled — that’s pretty much every cap, lid, and a lot of beauty minis. 

At the end of the day, recycling is a business. Recycling plants will only recycle what they can recycle at a profit — things like large pieces of clear plastic, clear glass, and aluminum. “The question is really not can something be recycled, but will it be,” Szaky said at a recent sustainability summit.

When plastic is recycled, there are still a couple of catches.

I am by no means suggesting you give up on trying to recycle the plastic that comes into your life. Even a nine-percent recycling rate is a lot of plastic that avoids a landfill. In 2018, for example, just in the U.S. alone, 7.9 billion units of rigid plastic were created for beauty and personal care products, according to Euromonitor International. 

What’s nine percent of that? 711 million units of rigid plastic. Plastic isn’t endlessly reworkable, though — most plastics can only be processed once or twice. Recycling plastic essentially downgrades its resulting quality every time it is put through the process — and that means virgin plastic may have to be added to make a “recycled” package functional. 

And, of course, there needs to be a demand for post-consumer recycled plastic for it to have anywhere to go. With reports of large amounts of plastic being incinerated or sitting in storage due to lack of need, this has been a real problem. However, with more companies working with recycled material very slowly increasing, there is some hope for the future. 

“Biodegradable” plastic very often… isn’t.

You may notice a shift toward plastic made from natural sources designed to break down more quickly. “These include materials such as sugarcane, and there are also opportunities to source from other innovative feedstocks such as seaweed and other algae, as well as food waste by-products,” says Olga Kachook, senior manager at GreenBlue, a nonprofit dedicated to the sustainable use of materials. 

These alternative plastics could have a big positive impact: A 2017 study found that switching from traditional plastic to corn-based material could reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent.

Yet there’s a pretty big “but” here. Some of these alternative materials can contain additives that “may actually result in more environmental harm,” says Kachook. And the term “biodegradable” itself unfortunately doesn’t mean much. “Biodegradability is driven by many factors and stating a package is ‘biodegradable’ doesn’t qualify the timeline, conditions required, safety of the elements, or the degree of degradation,” says Alison Younts, lead sustainability consultant at the consulting company Trayak.

And, for now, looking for the word “compostable” doesn’t help either. A compostable certification only indicates that a material is able to break down in large municipal or industrial composting facilities as opposed to a home or community bin. Right now only four percent of Americans have access to curbside composting pickup, says Szaky. And in a recent study conducted by TerraCycle, only one in 10 of the industrial composters where those curbside binds wind up actually accept compostable plastics.

But plastic isn’t all bad. (Didn’t see that coming did you?)

Yes, plastic pollution is a crisis. But, unfortunately, there is no magic-bullet alternative material, and plastic alternatives can in some cases cause as much if not more environmental impact. 
Glass, aluminum, and paper all have their own drawbacks — including being more expensive, something consumers may not be ready for, according to a 2019 Euromonitor report — and choosing one of them over plastic isn’t always a sure-fire path to reducing your overall carbon footprint.

Take aluminum, which gets a lot of buzz for being widely recycled, endlessly reusable if uncontaminated, and lightweight. However, it’s important to note that it’s recycled aluminum that gets all the love. When the package you’re buying is virgin, it’s another story, as the byproducts of producing new aluminum, according to the EPA, have global warming potentials (GWP) 6,500 to 9,200 times as strong as carbon dioxide. 

And, of course, it has to be recycled by the consumer, which happens about 35 percent of the time when it comes to the category including packaging, according to the EPA. While that’s a number much stronger than plastic recycling, it still leaves a lot of room for improvement.

Paper has its own concerns. When it comes to virgin materials, Life cycle assessments of paper, including those in a case study looking at grocery bags in Singapore published this year in the Journal of Cleaner Production, suggest plastic bags could have a lower overall environmental footprint than paper ones. Recycling paper does cut its CO2 output (as is the case with most recycled materials compared to their virgin counterparts) by a considerable amount (40 percent less) but it can only be recirculated between five to seven times, according to the EPA.

And then there’s glass, a material with complex considerations. It’s not always practical, as soapy hands and steamy conditions offer the threat of shattered bottles in your shower. And according to a study published last year in the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment that put pasteurized milk bottles made of virgin plastic, recycled plastic, glass, and returnable glass bottles head to head, even after factoring in the savings from reuse, returnable glass ranked behind plastic in CO2 emissions due to the high energy demand in the production process, as well as the carbon footprint of shipping it. 

But reusable glass came out on top in another important category the: marine litter indicator. Glass doesn’t have the same impact seen in marine life as plastic does as it breaks down. (In 2015, one study found that a quarter of the fish sold at markets in Indonesia and California, for example, were found to contain human made debris–either plastic or other fibrous materials.)

It’s hard out here for an environmentally-conscious consumer. And it can be a tough call for brands when deciding which tradeoffs to make. “Plastic packaging offers a number of benefits, including being lightweight and often requiring less material overall for a package than other materials like glass and aluminum,” says Kachook. “Switching to other formats without considering the tradeoffs might increase the emissions of shipping or sourcing the material.”

So what do we, as beauty-loving consumers, do?

For all of the many factors in this conversation, that answer to that question is actually pretty simple. First and foremost, focus on the “reduce” portion of reduce, reuse, recycle. Strip your routine down to the basics and simply buy less stuff. When possible, you can opt for packaging-free bar options (such as Ethique’s shampoo and conditioner bars). 

Refillable packaging is another thing to consider, either directly through beauty brands with refill programs or via Loop, which offers borrowable containers given for a refundable deposit you get back when you return the empty to be professionally cleaned and reused. Pantene, REN, The Body Shop, and more are part of the program, and it recently got a big boost by partnering with Ulta to create the loopbyulta.com store. 

For the empties you do end up with, there are ways to up your chances of having the material reused. First, you can check to see if the brand behind it has a mail-back recycling program of its own like Burt’s Bees. If it doesn’t, TerraCycle takes packaging (including hard-to-recycle items) either through drop-off locations (including Nordstrom stores) or via mail with purchasable boxes and labels. 

The organization (which is also behind the Loop store) estimates that last year about 10 percent of all the waste it diverted from landfills in 2020 was related to the beauty industry, thanks in part to its launch of over 50 new recycling programs around the U.S. during the COVID-19 pandemic. “By the end of 2020, about one-third of all of our active brand-sponsored recycling programs were for beauty-related products,” says Alex Payne, North American public relations associate for TerraCycle. 

Finally, it’s simply back to showing up with your dollars (i.e., votes) by researching before you add to cart. There are niche lines focusing on sustainability (like the 90 percent plastic-free We Are Paradoxx) and companies finding smart ways to reduce their plastic waste (like Colgate’s new Keep toothbrush with an aluminum handle that you, well, keep forever, replacing only the small plastic head) and big splashy pledges from big brands (like Unilever’s plan for sustainable living and Estée Lauder Companies’ new initiative to create an advanced recycled tube package some time this year) and smaller promises to use more PCR material to reduce the demand for virgin plastic… it all adds up. 

Pay attention as well to partnerships with groups such as GreenBlue‘s Sustainable Packaging Coalition, which helps companies make more sustainable choices as well as educate consumers with its clear How2Recycle labeling program. The Recycling Partnership has created the Pathway of Circularity program to help guide companies through the process of creating packaging materials that will actually get recycled. They’re currently working with Burt’s Bees, Colgate-Palmolive, Johnson & Johnson, L’Oréal USA, Procter & Gamble, and more.

Buying from these brands making moves truly helps the bigger picture. “Investors are looking at what the consumer is doing,” says Simon Fischweicher, head of corporations and supply chains at CDP North America. Nonprofit that runs a global disclosure system for investors and companies to manage their environmental impacts. Purchasing a product that is labeled or advertised to have more sustainable packaging in itself can have a positive impact. 

“Maybe spending that extra 75 cents isn’t going to change the world, but that decision is part of a collection of decisions that people are making that creates a trend,” says Fischweicher. And, trends can become movements — the hope here is to make the movement big enough that it’s not even a possibility for brands not to act.

ALLURE article

How Katie Jane Hughes Went From Backstage Manicurist To One Of Instagram’s Most Recognizable Makeup Artists

By now, it’s been well-established that social media has turned those who might otherwise be beauty enthusiasts into downright industry powerhouses. People like Marianna Hewitt and Jackie Aina have been able to build entire businesses through channels like Instagram and YouTube.

But while Katie Jane Hughes definitely leveraged Instagram to get to where she is today, her path has been slightly different from your average influencer’s. For one, she’s not shilling her own products; for another, she isn’t known for doing one signature style of “Instagram makeup” — and that’s because her actual beauty signature is experimentation.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #50 series on my blog.

“As soon as I started to wear makeup myself, and the crazy changes of makeup styles that I did go through — which were terrifying, now that I look at it — you have to go through all of those to find your signature style,” she says. “And I don’t think we ever really land on our signature style; I think that we land on different signature styles throughout our lives.”

That means that followers of Hughes will learn how to do something she dubs “Big Mac Energy” (yellow lids with bright red-lips) one day, and how to layer Weleda Skin Food under Glossier Haloscope for a glossy highlight the next. That sense of playfulness is partially how Hughes got where she is today as an in-demand makeup artist. A few years ago, she began experimenting with the kind of editorial looks she wanted to do professionally on her own face and posting them to Instagram. 

From there, she grew a huge following pretty organically; now, she works with brands like Glossier and the newly launched Rose Inc., creating looks for campaigns. It’s a bit of a leap from where Hughes first began: She learned how to do nails and was working with brands backstage at fashion week, even though her real passion was in makeup. But while it may seem to the outside world that Hughes is undoubtedly, well, “making it,” she’s not resting on her laurels just yet.

“I’m not where I want to be, and I feel like that sentence — ‘I’m not where I want to be’ — is something that I don’t take lightly, because I don’t think any of us are ever where we want to be,” she says. “There’s always room to grow, room to develop and learn more stuff.”

When did you first become interested in beauty?

Really, back when I was a little kid, because my mom was a singer and I always used to watch her put her makeup on before she would go on stage. She would have these scarlet-red lips, these black lashes that were super-thick and bushy and beautiful, and loads of bronzer. She was just super, super glam. Seeing my mom transform into this stage siren was really cool.

I wanted to do music too, initially. You know, music and beauty really weirdly go hand in hand. I think you’ll find a lot of people who are talented in music and are also talented in makeup. I don’t know what the actual tie is, but it’s often a common thread.

What were your first jobs within the beauty industry?

My first job in the makeup industry was at an Estée Lauder counter back when I was 17 in my hometown of Birkdale, in Merseyside, [England]. It was the first time I started finger-painting with eye shadows, and I remember getting kicked under the counter by my manager, because I was like, “Yeah, just use your fingers for all these eye shadows, it looks great!” and she was like, “No, you could be selling brushes!” I was like “Whatever, I like the way this looks with my fingers.” I just painted Rosie Huntington-Whiteley for a Rose Inc. shoot with my fingers for one of the looks, and it’s a funny, full-circle kind of situation. 

I didn’t really love that counter experience and that counter lifestyle, but you have to go through it; it’s training, and it’s an integral part of doing makeup. You have to learn on real people before you learn on models. 

From there, I was 17, 18, and I got a job in a nail shop and learned how to do nails. I was a manicurist for about five years, doing nails in salons, and when I moved to London in 2008, I started to do nails in London in a fashion environment, which helped me connect with all these people. I knew I wanted to do makeup, and that was a very much a stepping-stone career for me.

Then I began assisting people who wanted someone that could do nails, as well, for jobs where there wasn’t a manicurist on set. It was a weird, fortunate situation to be in, because people wouldn’t necessarily [hire an artist to do] their nails with their makeup — which I totally get now. Even though I was already there in my head, I wasn’t being taken seriously by my peers. 

I always knew that I wanted to rebrand when I moved to the U.S. in 2013. I was Butter London’s global ambassador for about three and a half years, and I moved there to be with them because they were also wanting [to launch] makeup. I thought, this is the perfect opportunity to go from nails into makeup.

I started putting makeup more at the top of my priority list, and then when I left the brand in 2016, I just disassociated myself with nails completely. It was like, this is it, this is where I’m going to cut ties with my nail past. A lot of people don’t even know that I used to do nails now, and it’s only been two years. It’s quite amazing how [social media has helped] going cold-turkey into makeup.

How did social media help you make that transition?

I honestly don’t think I would be where I am now without social media. I never really assisted for anyone because of the nail thing, so I definitely took a different path. I think that it would’ve taken a lot longer, and I think that social media is changing the game for so many talented creatives like me. It’s become this mini-agent and given us a platform to show what we can do, and what our styles are. 

For me, my social media blew up because I was basically posting creative looks on my own face that I wanted to do in an editorial setting, but I wasn’t really getting to do it because editorial was so neutral and natural. Only the biggest and the best makeup artists would get to do the creative stuff. 

If my Instagram was what it is now, but four years ago, the people that take me seriously now would not have taken me seriously then. I strongly believe that. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with what I just said, I think it’s just that things have to get there on their own, and people have to get there on their own. Even though I was shooting a few editorials and a few branded things every month before my social really took off, you didn’t really get the opportunity for jobs back then, in 2014 and 2015, to do the creative stuff that we get to do now because of social media. People weren’t as expressive on social media like that.

Where did you get the idea to use your social media as a platform?

I was seeing a lot of what I would call “Instagram makeup” on Instagram, but nothing else — that heavy brow, that heavy contour and that heavy lip, and the cut crease and the liquid liner and all of the things, the lashes. That’s totally fine, and I loved watching those tutorials; it’s not my style or my aesthetic anymore, but I was there at one point in my life. I genuinely have such a deep appreciation for it, because it’s really fucking hard to do that makeup. I actually tried to do it on myself a couple of times, just out of the sheer fun factor. I had to stop halfway through, because I couldn’t actually do it. 

I’m okay with that, because it’s not the style of makeup that I do, and it’s not the style of makeup that I think I would ever get asked to do on set, which is what I care most about. My makeup in an editorial setting and an advertising setting, because that’s my career. The Instagram stuff is really just a bonus, cool little side project for me. It’s my passion project, being able to educate women and men and whomever wants to wear makeup around the world doing the similar styles that I do on myself.

I really like feeling like I’ve got a minimal, fresh complexion; quirky, cool color combinations that inspire me. I think that I put something out there that spoke to me as a creative and [it resonated with people] because they didn’t find that many accounts like mine. Now my Instagram is literally my agent; it books me every single one of my jobs.

Makeup done by KJH.

Why is it important to stay accessible to people who follow you?

Because it’s like, without them, what’s the point? Without actually helping them reach their beauty goals, or inspiring them to try something new, to get closer to what they want to be at that period in their life, what’s the point? It’s very hard to engage back sometimes, because it really takes everything out of you when you’re just feeling a little bit like you don’t want to be on and you just want to do nothing. 

People notice that you’re not there. It’s funny, I was away for a week and somebody was like, “Is everything okay? I haven’t seen you on Instagram,” and I’m like, “No, I’m good, thank you so much for checking in, but I just needed to take a week off.” It’s amazing that people would notice that, but it’s also amazing that it takes that much work. I don’t think of it as work, I think of it as a hobby that just takes a lot of my time up. But everything relies on engagement. Why do it if you don’t have the time to engage? 

How did the experience of working within a brand prepare you for what you do now?

I don’t think I would ever work with a brand exclusively ever again. Not because it was bad, but because I really, really love being able to use multiple brands. Back then, I did use multiple brands; I just wasn’t able to talk freely as much to the public about what I loved and used, because I was always talking about that brand — and I wanted to talk about that brand, because I had a big hand in some of the product development.

I don’t even think if I ever did my own line — which I probably won’t, because there’s just so much stuff on the market, but who knows — I don’t think I would even be exclusive to my own brand, ever. I just think everybody loves Chanel Soleil de Tan, and everyone loves Nars Creamy Concealer.

How do you choose which brands you work with?

If something goes in my kit professionally, it’s 99.9 percent on my table at home. The best thing a brand can do if they know that an artist likes something is send them two, because they’ll get double exposure from that person’s social channels, if they have one, and then in their kit. 

Texture is a massive thing for me; if something has a beautiful texture and reads beautifully in a photograph, then it’s definitely going in my kit and in my table. Like, Weleda Skin Food is an absolute massive one for me, as are most Glossier products, like Stretch Concealer, I use at home and I use in my kit, as does Haloscope; Creamy Concealer from Nars is also on my table and on my kit, as is the Caudalie mist. There’s so many.

How do you choose which projects you take on?

This is another amazing thing about social media. I work quite closely with Glossier, where I do some of their shoots and I create some of their content, and I’ve seen a few products [prior to launch], but I was talking about that brand super-organically on my Instagram prior to working with them. 

I always start talking about a product organically first, even if the brand approaches me and says, “Oh, we really want to work with you.” I’m like, “Well, send me stuff, let me use it first, see how it feels, let me use it on my social and Instagram Stories, see if [my followers] like the product, if they’re interested in seeing more, and then we go from there.” I wouldn’t just take a random product out of thin air and go, “Oh, look at this, it’s cool!” It’s not my style at all.

What’s your favorite part of the job?

It’s getting involved in the creative process from start to finish. I just worked on a campaign with Innisfree; the content will be out in September, but I worked on a project with them from start to finish where I weighed in on the casting of the girls, weighed in on the photographer and weighed in on the looks that I created for the campaign, and I’ll weigh in a little bit on the editing. The same goes with brands like Glossier. It’s more of that whole, full-circle creative process from either a branded or an editorial standpoint.

[From a] social standpoint, the best part of it is just feeling like you’ve made somebody’s day and helped them achieve their beauty goals that they’ve struggled to achieve.

What’s something you wish you’d known when you were first starting out?

Nothing really. I feel like about four years ago, I probably would have said that I wish I had known that it was more important to spend more time assisting and try to get on as somebody’s first assistant for a good four or five years. But I think, because of the way my career took a turn, I’d probably be doing myself a disservice by doing that. I feel like my path took a turn that I didn’t think it would take.

What advice would you give someone looking to follow in your footsteps?

Find a signature makeup style that makes you happy, share it, post it, don’t over-edit your content if you like that real-life kind of skin. Keep promoting yourself in a way, but not in an obsessive way; just do it in a very natural, organic way.

It’s such a collaborative industry nowadays. Rosie Huntington-Whiteley found me on Instagram and was like, “I really love your work, I’d love to work with you sometime,” and it went from me doing her makeup for an event in New York to working on a bunch of Rose Inc. stuff with her. You’ve just got to figure out who you want to create with and try to make that happen and learn from it and grow from it.

How have you seen the industry change since you started out?

There’s definitely more room for the new guard of talent; the old guard of talent are doing a slightly different thing. They’re launching brands and they’re doing more collaborative things with brands, whereas the new guard of talent is doing more social collaborations and getting more of that airtime on editorial websites and editorial Instagram. Before I felt like a lot of the talent that would’ve been featured in print, like quotes about products and that kind of stuff, would have been the iconic, old-guard kind of crew, now I feel like it’s much more my generation, the up-and-comers getting that space, which I think is awesome.

What is your ultimate goal for yourself?

I think I’ve done a lot of amazing things so far — I led a fashion show at Lincoln Center, that was a massive moment for me. I cried at the end of the show because there was so much pressure on it, and I was just so proud. I got emotional after the Rose Inc. shoot. There’s so many things that I’ve done, I feel ungrateful to say that I haven’t gotten there yet. But I feel like more of what I’m doing now is what I want to do more of. 

I think if I did a collaboration with a brand that I really, really, really loved, that had my name on it somehow, that was super-organic and true to my brand as well as their brand, that would be a pretty special thing. 

@katiejanehughes ON INSTAGRAM

FASHIONISTA article

In Largest Deal Yet, Estée Lauder To Acquire Deciem At $2.2B Valuation

The future looks even brighter for cult skincare beauty brands The Ordinary and NIOD, part of Deciem Inc.—following Estée Lauder’s $1 billion purchase for majority stake in the Canadian-based, multi-brand company. 

Estée Lauder Companies Inc. announced that it will increase its investment in Deciem Beauty Group Inc., from 29% to 76%. 

ELC, which owns a portfolio of leading beauty brands including MAC, La Mer and Bobbi Brown, made its initial investment in June 2017, and will purchase the remaining interest after a three-year period. Net sales at Deciem for the 12 months ended Jan. 31 were approximately $460 million. 

“Over the last four years, we have built a truly special long-term partnership with the incredible Deciem team, and we are excited for what the future holds,” said Fabrizio Freda, president and chief executive officer at Estée Lauder Companies, in a prepared release.

“The company’s hero products, desirable innovation, and digital- and consumer-first high-touch approach have been instrumental to its success.”

In 2013, Brandon Truaxe founded Deciem, known as “the abnormal beauty company,” with the goal of raising transparency in the beauty industry. The company’s portfolio includes six brands; The Ordinary is its largest brand followed by NIOD.

The Ordinary, whose celebrity fans include Kim Kardashian, retails from $3.95 to $28.90, while the vast majority of products retail under $10. The brand’s top-selling product is the Niacinamide 10% + Zinc 1%, a skin blemish serum, for $5.90. According to the company, one product sells every second globally. If The Ordinary offers broad appeal with its budget-friendly prices, NIOD, whose slogan is “skincare for the hyper-educated,” is the higher-end crown jewel in terms of marrying science with skincare. For instance, the smaller-size 15 ml. Copper Amino Isolate Serum retails for $60. All of the Deciem products are created in house in the lab. 

“One of the biggest marketing drivers is word of mouth and this can only be achieved by creating formulations that are loved,” said Nicola Kilner, cofounder and chief executive officer of Deciem. “Our products have high levels of trusted ingredients, clear percentages of actives, and most importantly they work.” 

Part of the beauty products’ appeal is their simple, almost scientific-looking design. 

“The bottles create a lab-like visual in a bathroom cabinet,” Kilner said. “The design has led to a larger conversation about ingredients, we have resonated with a newly coined consumer, the ‘skintellectual,’ who knows exactly what to put on their skin, what the formulas do and in which products to find these ingredients.” 

Being a part of the Estée Lauder family will open up a whole new world for Deciem, the executive noted. 

“You look at the ELC portfolio of brands and now The Ordinary can mix right next to La Mer,” Kilner said. “We always tried to push that price point does not define luxury.”

The acquisition will allow Deciem to have access to Estée Lauder’s vast resources to grow their brands, particularly global distribution and supply chain.

“We will continue scaling The Ordinary,” Kilner said. “Then we want to get back to the heart of Deciem, which is to be an incubator of brands. Our research and development chemists are working on formulations for new brands as we speak.” 

The company’s journey and rise to cult beauty status was not without challenges and growing pains. 

“Estée Lauder supported us at our lowest, continue to trust our decisions and most importantly they have loved us throughout,” Kilner said. 

The $1 billion paid by Estée Lauder reflects a market value of $2.2 billion. Excluding this gain, Deciem’s net sales and earnings are expected to have a negligible impact on Estée Lauder’s fiscal year 2021 consolidated results, according to the release. The acquisition is expected to close in the quarter ending June 30.

Deciem’s founder Truaxe recognized the synergy between the brands and said Estée Lauder was the only “forever home” for the innovative beauty company. 

“They put brand ahead of business and are family-orientated throughout—two values we ferociously hold dear,” Kilner noted.

WWD article
FORBES article

Coach Teams Up With Sephora For A Makeup Collection

Well, this was unexpected…Dinosaurs and unicorns will be featured on the products that are being targeted to Gen Z and Millennials.

Break out your quilted Coach cosmetic pouch because, for the first time ever, Coach makeup is now a thing. Thanks to a new sure-to-sell-out collab with Sephora Collection, the American heritage brand is debuting a flashy new assortment of beauty must-haves. Think glittery lip glosses, groovy makeup brushes, and collectible eye-to-face palettes in the likeness of Coach’s unofficial mascots, Rexy, Sharky, and Uni. “This collection is inspired by Coach’s free-spirited attitude, which really comes to life through the colorful and animated packaging, and is grounded in the beauty expertise of Sephora Collection,” Brooke Banwart, Vice President & General Manager of Sephora Collection, exclusively tells Refinery29. “Together with Coach, we set out to create a unique collection of wearable essentials that will evoke a sense of confidence and embody the core values of both brands.”

As any Coach stan will notice, iconic brand motifs like the brand’s animal friends, ladylike tea roses, and hangtag charm feature heavily in the packaging. “We took all of [the brand inspiration] and developed product formulas and shades that were high-quality at an affordable price point, which is what our clients know and love about Sephora Collection,” Banwart adds. “We worked closely with Coach to finalize the color palette and align on all details from metal finishes to colored glitter.” The full collection became available on March 2, and prices start at $16 for a pack of soothing eye patches and top out at $68 for the five-piece brush set. Palettes clock in at $38 apiece, and feature cheeky designs like rose-embossed pans, and a fashion-forward color palette that evokes Coach’s downtown-cool vibe.

SHOP THE PRODUCTS BELOW

Coach x Sephora Collection Rexy Eyeshadow Palette

Inspired by the fearless and playful spirit of Rexy, leader of the Coach mascots, this palette provides impeccable payoff with blendable formula. The versatile shades allow you to create both everyday and playful looks that are easy to apply on the go, making this palette a must-have accessory for your handbag. 

Buy at Sephora $38

Coach x Sephora Collection Tea Rose Brush Set

This glittery five-piece brush set features playful Coach mascots and the tea rose, a symbol of the Coach girl’s wild, feminine spirit. Each brush was custom designed with a glitter handle and vegan, synthetic bristles. The set comes housed in a fun, glitter brush stand with detachable and adjustable rings in featuring Coach’s favorite mascots and the tea rose. 

This Set Contains:
– Powder brush 
– Angled blush brush 
– Highlight brush 
– Shadow brush 
– Crease brush 
– Stand 
– 5 x Adjustable rings

Buy at Sephora $68

Coach x Sephora Collection Sharky Eyeshadow Palette

Inspired by the fun and ferocious Sharky, one of the Coach mascots, this palette provides impeccable payoff with blendable formula. The versatile shades allow you to create both everyday and fun looks that are easy to apply on the go making this palette a must-have accessory for your handbag. 

Buy at Sephora $38

Coach x Sephora Collection Tea Rose Lipgloss Set

Inspired by the tea rose, a symbol of the Coach girl’s wild, feminine spirit, this nail set features an essential quick drying base/top coat and universal pretty pink shade for a complete nail look. Add a twist to your classic manicure with the self-adhesive nail stickers—an easy and convenient way to accent the nails. This free-spirited and ambitious set lets you sport whichever Coach mascot speaks to you on any given day. 

This Set Contains: 
– 4 x 0.156 oz/ 4.6 mL Lip Glosses in Nude Pink (pinky nude with subtle shimmer), Mauve (creamy light cocoa), Shimmer (multi-dimensional dazzling pink), Berry (burgundy).

Buy at Sephora $36

Coach x Sephora Collection Uni Face Palette

Inspired by magical Uni, one of the Coach mascots, these softly romantic matte and shimmer shades will take your glow to the next level. Use these three shades to complement your natural glow. They can be worn day or night and through every mood and memory you make. This palette is the perfect accessory to apply on the go making it a must-have for your handbag. 

This Set Contains: 
– 0.07 oz/ 1.99 g Rose (matte blush)
– 0.07 oz/ 1.99 g Bronze (shimmer highlight)
– 0.07 oz/ 1.99 g Clay (matte bronzer)

Buy at Sephora $38

Coach x Sephora Collection Tea Rose Eye Mask Set

Inspired by the tea rose, a symbol of the Coach girl’s wild, feminine spirit, these cucumber-rose infused masks are thin, curved sheets that contour to the shape of the under-eye area perfectly to stay in place. Apply while getting ready for the day or when winding down for the night. 

Highlighted Ingredients:
– Aloe Vera: Imparts conditioning and calming properties.
– Chamomile: Helps soothe the skin.
– Cucumber: Softens and moisturizes.

Buy at Sephora $16

Coach x Sephora Collection Tea Rose Nail Set

Inspired by the tea rose, a symbol of the Coach girl’s wild, feminine spirit, this nail set features an essential quick drying base/top coat and universal pretty pink shade for a complete nail look. Add a twist to your classic manicure with the self-adhesive nail stickers—an easy and convenient way to accent the nails. This free-spirited and ambitious set lets you sport whichever Coach mascot speaks to you on any given day.

This Set Contains:
– 0.25 oz/ 7.5 mL Pink Nail Polish
– 0.25 oz/ 7.5 mL Clear Base/Top Coat
– Nail stickers

Buy at Sephora $18

REFINERY29 article

3 Pretty Spring Beauty Trends From Bobbi Brown’s New Global Artistic Director

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #39 series on my blog.

There are few makeup bags that haven’t, at some point, been graced by a Bobbi Brown product. A brand that puts making women feel (as well as look) good at its core, 16th of January marked the 30th anniversary of its inception. To celebrate such a lengthy time in the beauty industry, the brand has, excitingly, appointed makeup artist Hannah Murray as global artistic director.

“Bobbi Brown is a brand I’ve loved since I started as a makeup artist,” Murray tells Vogue over the phone. “It’s such a well-loved global brand, and we have very similar philosophies regarding embracing natural beauty and individuality, as well as empowering women. These are things I’ve been championing for a while so it feels like a very natural fit.” Take a peek at Murray’s Instagram page, and you’ll see image after image of luminous skin, playful details around the eyes and bold brows on models and celebrities alike. Her makeup is real, fresh, and a far cry from the heavy contouring and airbrushed skin that have become popular in the last few years.

All of which makes her an excellent fit at a brand known for its feature-enhancing (rather than covering) products, where she will be overseeing everything from the fashion shows Bobbi Brown sponsors and campaigns, to education and product development. She has had experience with the latter before, having worked on the (rather brilliant) Topshop beauty line when it launched in 2011.

“I’m essentially going to be the visual voice of the brand, and I think with everything that’s been happening in the world, it’s a really pivotal moment to see things with fresh eyes and build on Bobbi Brown’s heritage,” she says. “I’ve lived in New York for the last 10 years, and before that in London, and I very much understand both the American aesthetic and the European sensibility and aesthetic too – it will be interesting to see that merge, something I think will give the brand a freshness, too.” When it comes to new products, we can expect some “innovation, excitement and fun”.

Though she isn’t, like many of us, forced to sit on Zoom all day, Murray is keenly aware of the “giving, giving, giving” that is endless, exhausting meetings, and believes in the power of beauty – whether that’s pampering your skin or applying some mascara – to uplift a mood. “There’s something ritualistic about [skincare and makeup]. Just like fresh air and eating well, having five to 10 minutes to yourself to cleanse, put a mask on, massage your skin is so healing. I have a three-year-old boy, so grabbing those moments is grounding. We all need to take care of ourselves and have a bit of me time.”

As for the beauty trends she expects to be big this year? Here she shares three of her key predictions.

Spa skin

“Instead of applying 10 products just to walk out of the door [like we used to], it’s now about feeding your skin and making it feel fresh and juicy and plump and alive. That’s a feeling thing, as well as being about how you look, and it’s using texture rather than product. You can layer on balms – I often dab Bobbi Brown’s gorgeous Lip Balm on cheekbones as it really makes skin look alive, like spa-fresh skin.”

“I’m hoping we’ve moved on from baking and cut creases – I want to see skin, feel it, and let it breathe. Another of my favourite products is the Bobbi Brown Extra Illuminating Moisture Balm, which is a lightweight moisturiser that imparts a subtle pearlescent finish for a “flawless, hyper-real skin effect”.

Outdoor glow

“I think everyone now wants to look healthy, like they’ve been outdoors and not stuck indoors for three months! I’m thinking the beauty of a real flushed cheek and freckles.” Try the brand’s Pot Rouge, a buttery-soft cream blush which melts into skin seamlessly for a natural finish.

’90s minimalism

“Take cues from the ’90s and apply eyeliner to your waterline to tight-line around the eye. It gives a bit of definition but it’s not laboured over. Makeup should do the work for you, you want to wear products that are smart, easy to use and that work well for you.”

VOGUE article

The Best Beauty Launches of 2021 (So Far)

Peace Out Retinol Eye Stick

This squalane-based balm not only nourishes dry under-eyes, but it also is packed with concentrated encapsulated retinol (which is more gentle on the sensitives skin region) to smooth the look of fine lines. 

Buy at Sephora $37

Maybelline New York Lash Sensational Sky High Mascara

This magical tube of mascara went viral on TikTok right after it hit stores thanks to its ability to transform stubby lashes in a few swipes — and believe us, it really does live up to the hype.

Buy at CVS $12

Living Proof Curl Elongator

From the brand’s first foray into the curly hair category, this cloud-like cream — designed for type 4A, 4B and 4C coils — gives game-changing definition. It also contains a Healthy Curl Complex, which provides a protective, strengthening barrier around each strand. 

Buy at Sephora $50

Supergoop! Daily Dose Vitamin C + SPF 40

Combining the two most important A.M. skincare steps, the first-ever hybrid Vitamin C and SPF lotion gives you no excuse to say you forgot either one.

Buy at Nordstrom $46

Sol de Janeiro Triple Brazilian Butter Hair Repair Treatment

This mask’s three Brazilian butters deeply nourish damaged ends. The best part? The warm, tropical scent makes you feel like you’re on vacation, which we’re all craving right now. 

Buy at Sephora $47

Caudalie Resveratrol-Lift Serum

Besides looking oh-so gorgeous on your vanity, this pretty pink potion really does pack a punch. The eco-conscious brand (this packaging is 100% recyclable through Terracycle) partnered with Harvard University to develop a patent-pending booster that’s proven to pump up your skin’s natural production of hyaluronic acid and collagen.

Buy at Spacenk $50

Olay Regenerist Collagen Peptide24 Moisturizer

The fragrance-free cream contains peptides that penetrate deep to perk up your complexion. Bonus: The texture feels just as luxurious as fancy formulas. 

Buy at ULTA $39

PEOPLE article