Why Do Cosmetics Brands Keep Collaborating With Late Artists?

MAC Cosmetics’ Whitney Houston collection is here, and it’s chock-full of the hyper-glam, 1980s-perfect staples with which the late vocalist remains associated to this day. Marked by bold smokey eyes and bold red and metallic-brown lips, Houston’s beauty regimen was as iconic as she herself was, throughout all her decades of fame. And now that it’s shoppable in luxe gold packaging, fans can get a small piece of her cult of personality, created alongside and approved by the Whitney Houston Estate itself.

MAC’s Houston line has been a long time coming. The brand announced the collection more than a year ago, last September, to be timed with the release of Houston biopic “I Wanna Dance With Somebody.” It’s also “something Whitney always wanted to do,” the artist’s sister-in-law and former manager Pat Houston told People. “I’m pleased we can do something that I know she would have loved.

If any makeup brand was going to bring this to fruition, it was MAC. The cosmetics giant has collaborated with celebrities for decades, even before celebrity beauty affiliations became ubiquitous. Its charitable Viva Glam initiative, which raises money and awareness for HIV/AIDS, has been releasing collections since 1994, including ones in partnership with living legends like Rihanna, Lady Gaga and, most recently, Rosalía. MAC’s first significant posthumous launch came in 2012, with a 28-piece makeup line inspired by Marilyn Monroe

Other late celebrities followed, including Selena Quintanilla, with a range that commemorated the 25th anniversary of her passing, and Aaliyah, thanks to a viral fan petition wherein shoppers went so far as to create mockups of products they wanted. Both sold out immediately. But experts attest that cosmetics brands like MAC aren’t just in it for the profits (although, yes, they do make money). For the estates of certain departed figures, like Houston, eye palettes and lipsticks are just one small, but not altogether insignificant, way to keep their legacy alive for a new generation. It’s also, somewhat uncouthly, good for business.

These posthumous launches aren’t necessarily money-drivers, but more so relationship-builders in a few ways,” says Kirbie Johnson, a beauty reporter and co-founder of beauty podcast Gloss Angeles. “If MAC and Estée Lauder have a great relationship with a movie studio, why not work together on promoting a film? Not to mention the fan relationship, which is important to a brand.”

Johnson goes on to explain that if an estate like Houston’s is angling for a makeup collaboration, it may feel more comfortable with a behemoth like MAC because, well, they know it will be done right. In Houston’s case, the packaging is elevated and the formulas are what you’d expect from a MAC product, Johnson says, and “you don’t feel like the brand skimped to make it.” As one of the top three global makeup brands, MAC sees a reported annual turnover of more than $1 billion, with 500 independent stores. 

I feel like MAC is a household name at this point, but some of this could be a play to either increase reach or awareness of the brand to the departed’s fanbase or simply to add consumer value,” adds Johnson. “MAC is a legacy brand; collaborating with icons like Selena, Aaliyah and Whitney positions them in the same category.”

A posthumous collaboration, however, is not without its risks. As Johnson says, the person the collaboration is being made for is no longer here, so how can they give approval? In 2017, for example, Urban Decay received a flood of criticism for its Jean-Michel Basquiat collection. (“An artist known for his highly critical takes on power structures like capitalism surely wouldn’t be putting out an eyeshadow palette,” says Johnson.) “You have to hope whoever is running the estate is someone they trusted and is acting in the deceased’s best interest,” says Johnson.

Indeed, fans of late icons, like Houston, are especially protective after their passing — which, ultimately, leads to higher sales. Cieja Springer, a longtime fashion marketer and founder of the “From the Bottom Up!” podcast, attributes this sensation to what she calls “brand regret,” which goes a step further than buyer’s remorse and tends to afflict those who, for a range of reasons, weren’t fans of the artist when they were alive. In the case of Gen Z, which is now captivating the cosmetics industry with its growing purchasing power, this is simply because they weren’t born yet.

In order for fans to not constantly live with the regret of not giving the artist their flowers while they were here, they jump on it now so they’re not left out,” says Springer. “It’s all about not being left out, at the end of the day.

With a posthumous product launch, fans are able to buy a piece of their favorite celebrity again (or for the first time) — and as Johnson adds, that opportunity may not come around again, which creates more incentive to buy the product. This is especially true in the case of figures like Aaliyah or Selena, who didn’t have a long period of fame before passing, “so perhaps there was less memorabilia for fans to purchase as a token of their love for both artists,” says Johnson. But of all the memorabilia and merch possibilities, why makeup? 

Whether the celebrity is currently active in their field or not, there’s a shorthand that exists with the ‘look’ and palette of a highly celebrated and media-visible celebrity that gives the consumer an ability to recreate famous looks or a style with which they identify, or find aspirational,” answers Professor Stephan Kanlian, chairperson of FIT’s unique master’s degree program for emerging leaders in the cosmetics and fragrance sector. “It’s a basic need of universal beauty that individuals aspire to copy the look of someone they see as having great beauty or style.”

After all, makeup products are more attainable than, say, fashion items for most fans, especially younger ones. Johnson offers the example of Harry Styles’s HA HA HA capsule for Gucci, which starts at $235 for a pair of striped logo socks, with T-shirts running around $750. “I’d bet most fans are sporting his $20 Pleasing nail polish instead,” she notes.

Most people cannot afford a Chanel bag, but they can afford Les Beiges Bronzer,” says Johnson. “As for celebrities who have passed, you can’t carry a record on your person to show you’re a fan, but you can pull a Whitney Houston-branded MAC compact from your bag.”

FASHIONISTA

9 Things To Know About Marilyn Monroe’s Beauty Regime

From the bee-stung red lips to her trademark platinum curls, Marilyn Monroe was – and still is – the ultimate bombshell and beauty icon, who had a penchant for glamour that resonates with so many of us today. As the Marilyn biopic Blonde divides opinion on Netflix, British Vogue takes a look at the star’s Old Hollywood beauty routine. 

She stayed out of the sun

I’m personally opposed to a deep tan because I like to feel blonde all over,” explained Monroe of why she stayed out of the sun – despite the fact it was in “vogue in California”. Forget the bronzers and fake tans many of us swear by today, she was all about the alabaster look.

She liked a very specific shade of blonde

If you’ve ever wondered what hair hue Monroe requested when she graced the colourist’s chair, you probably wouldn’t guess it was “pillow case white”. According to the author Pamela Keogh, Monroe had her hair bleached every three weeks with a roster of hairstylists including Pearl Porterfield (who also tended to Jean Harlow’s pale blonde hair) and Kenneth Battelle. To avoid washing it too much (which can affect the colour), she swore by a makeshift dry shampoo – Johnson’s Baby Powder – applying every two days to keep her hair looking fresh.

A nifty make-up artist’s trick for plump lips

How to create the full, pouty lips Marilyn was so well known for? A clever use of lipsticks, no less. Her make-up artist would apply up to five different red hues – darker, plummy reds on the outside, and lighter towards the inside – to create the illusion of dimension and plumpness. A clever tip that many make-up artists still use today.

She knew the importance of sleep

A woman who enjoyed her sleep, Monroe took between five and 10 hours of shut-eye a night in a wide single bed. On Sunday? “[It’s] my one day of total leisure. I sometimes take two hours to wake up, luxuriating in every last moment of drowsiness,” she said in an interview with Pageant magazine.

What she wore to bed

Monroe famously didn’t wear clothes to bed, stating that pyjamas and “creepy nightgowns” disturbed her sleep. What she did wear, however, was five drops of Chanel No.5, a perfume that she is also said to have added into her ice baths. 

Yes… ice baths

While Wim Hof and numerous athletes have since popularised ice-cold showers and baths, Marilyn was well ahead of the curve. It is said that she used to take ice-cold baths to keep her skin firm and tight.

How she looked after her skin

Monroe joined the likes of Audrey Hepburn in regularly seeing Hungarian dermatologist, Erno Laszlo. Suffering from dry skin (she is rumoured to have obsessively washed her face up to five times a day to ward off breakouts), Laszlo prescribed the actress a rigorous skincare routine, which differed depending on the time of day and occasion. Her evening skincare routine began with an oil cleanse, using the Erno Laszlo Active Phelityl Oil, then she applied the Active Phelityl Cream and washed it off. She finished with the Controlling Lotion. All of these products are still available today.

Get the Monroe glow

While today we go wild for highlighter, Monroe got her glow in another, perhaps less tempting, way. Deploying the K-beauty trend for “slugging”, she would apply layers of Vaseline under her foundation to help skin catch the light. She was also a fan of cold cream, like Pond’s, and other iconic products we still use today, including Elizabeth Arden’s Eight Hour Cream and Nivea Creme, and even olive oil, which she also reportedly applied to her skin to offset dryness.

She wasn’t a natural exercise fanatic

I don’t count rhythmically like the exercise people on the radio; I couldn’t stand exercise if I had to feel regimented about it,” said Monroe about her approach to working out. Many of us will relate. Instead, she enjoyed a “simple bust-firming routine” which involved lifting two, five-pound weights above her head 15 times, moving from a “spread-eagle arm position”. She would do it bedside until she was tired each morning.

VOGUE

Jared Leto Launches Beauty Brand After Years of People Asking for His Skincare Secrets

Jared Leto announced his new brand, sharing, “I’ve never been really interested in beauty products. But I’m interested in the idea of taking care of ourselves in the most natural way possible.”

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #97 series on my blog.

Jared Leto is entering the House of Beauty.

The 50-year-old is credited with unlocking the secret to eternal youth, as his wrinkle-free skin has remained an unsolved mystery for years. But the House of Gucci star is ready to finally share his secrets with the launch of his new beauty brand.

On Oct. 18, Jared introduced Twentynine Palms, an 11-piece line that offers skincare, body care and hair care products. And while the actor maintains he’s no beauty expert, he knows a thing or two about prioritizing wellness.

I know I’m a student here, but I think that’s the best place to be,” he told Vogue. “I’ve never been really interested in beauty products. But I’m interested in the idea of taking care of ourselves in the most natural way possible.”

Thirty Seconds to Mars frontman—whose brand is named after the California town near the Joshua Tree National Park—has enlisted ingredients inspired by mother nature, including prickly pear extract and kaolin powder.

Because of this challenging, unforgiving environment,” Jared said, “these ingredients have to be incredibly resilient to survive.

Jared’s foray into the beauty space comes eight months after he opened up to Men’s Health about his youthful appearance.

People started talking about my age and that sort of thing 10 years ago,” the Oscar winner said in March. “As you get older, people start saying, ‘Ah, you’re still young.’ And then there’s this age where they go, ‘Really?‘”

And while he understood that everyone wants to know his skincare secrets, he teased that he was going to keep everybody guessing. As he put it, “At the end of the day, it doesn’t really matter.”

But it turns out, he’s ready to share a glimpse into his routine.

EONLINE

This Scalp Oil From Jonathan Van Ness’ Haircare Line Heals Dead Ends and Dry Strands

Ever since Jonathan Van Ness, Queer Eye’s grooming guru with a heart of gold, shared that he created a collection of haircare products, he’s been helping shoppers address their hair concerns and achieve their best manes possible. JVN Hair products range from shampoos and conditioners to hair treatments and stylers. And one of the brand’s most-loved products is the Complete Pre-Wash Scalp Oil.

Van Ness, a true hair enthusiast, is all about quality hair treatments, which is why JVN Hair products are all sulfate-free, vegan, cruelty-free, silicone-free. All of the brand’s products, like said scalp oil, include its “hero ingredient,” clean hemisqualane — which, per the brand, promotes stronger hair strands, starting at the scalp. JVN Hair treatments are that extra boost to help keep your hair hydrated and support your scalp’s health.

Shop now: $29; jvnhair.com

With hundreds of positive reviews on JVN Hair’s website, it’s clear that this Pre-Wash Scalp Oil is suitable for shoppers with all hair types and concerns, including dry and itchy scalps with buildup. Many customers shared that they saw improvements after a few uses and love the fresh and cozy scent of this oil that has notes of lemon, mandarin, amber, and cashmere. 

One shopper with coarse and curly hair said that the restoring scalp treatment made their hair feel “so incredibly hydrated and smooth.” Another happy customer, who has used this product for over a year, said that this oil “worked wonders” on their fine and thin hair. Other shoppers remarked at how well this pre-wash treatment relieves itchiness and flakes, and that their hair feels stronger and looks shinier. One even said it “made a noticeable difference for [their] dead ends.”

This scalp treatment is super easy to use. Add a few drops of this oil directly on a dry scalp, then massage and work through the hair to the ends. Let it sit for about 15 minutes before washing it out with shampoo. 

For softer, shinier, and stronger strands, shop the JVN Complete Pre-Wash Scalp Oil for $29.

INSTYLE

How To Get The Duchess Of Sussex’s Perfect Waves, According To Her Hairstylist

It had been over two years since the Duchess of Sussex, Meghan, and her go-to hairstylist, George Northwood, last saw one other. Like many others, they were separated not just by an ocean, but by a pandemic. “The last time [before the Invictus Games 2022] I worked with Harry and Meghan was on the day of the ‘umbrella’ moment [the viral photo of the couple in the rain outside the Endeavour Awards 2020],” he tells Vogue. “It was an emotional time. I remember being at Buckingham Palace and, at the time, the Invictus Games were planned for the Hague in 2020, so when I said goodbye, it was more of a see you later. Little did we know!

The umbrella moment in March 2020, and the last time Northwood styled the Duchess’s hair.
 Samir Hussein

The Games eventually went ahead over Easter weekend, two years later than planned. As soon as he arrived in the Netherlands, Northwood went straight to visit the couple and “gave them both a cuddle”. The reunion was a sweet one – and not merely because of the hair magic it brought about. Just as he had done so many times before – from that perfectly undone wedding hair to myriad royal tour looks – Northwood created a series of excellent hairstyles on Meghan, as she made a brief return to the spotlight in support of the event her husband founded for wounded military personnel. 

Meghan in Brandon Maxwell at the Invictus Games.
 Patrick van Katwijk

Perhaps most notable of all were the perfect glossy waves that tumbled over Meghan’s cream, belted blazer by Brandon Maxwell at the Games on Sunday. Here, Northwood shares how to recreate the look at home.

Blow dry first

This is a more polished wave – undone, but with a luxe feeling to it. It’s key to create a good foundation in the hair, so instead of a rough blow dry, blow hair out smoothly. If you’re going for a centre parting, blow dry the front of the hair forward – this creates a sweeping motion when you part it afterwards.”

Use a big-barrel tong

Using a large-barrel tong, work your way around the head, taking sections of hair and curling them. Tong away from the face at the front of the hair, and focus on the mid-lengths, rather than roots and ends, to encourage more of a wave than a curl. Once you’ve taken the tong out of each section, pull hair straight so it cools in a softer bend. At the end, use your fingers or a paddle brush to brush through hair.

Up the shine

When it comes to products, focus on shine – aim for a luxe, glossy finish. Shine sprays, creams or serums are great to help smooth it.

VOGUE

With Ciara’s New Brand OAM, Radiant Skin Is Just a One-Two Step Away

Of all the burning questions our minds have been inundated with this year (Who will date Pete next? Do I need curtain bangs?) perhaps the most common one asked is: Do we really need another celebrity beauty brand? It’s no secret we’ve hit peak celebrity beauty brand fatigue, with each release that enters the fold—seemingly every other week—eliciting constant eye rolls from consumers who are still trying to catch up to the last one. However, there’s a new celebrity brand from Ciara that might make you, dare I say it, 1, 2, step

Like her other purpose-driven extracurricular ventures—House of LR&C (Love, Respect, and Care), which the star founded with husband Russell Wilson and entrepreneur Christine Day, and its in-house ready-to-wear brand LITA (Love Is The Answer)—Ciara is launching a skincare brand, OAM (On a Mission) that further drives the notion that love is at the root of everything, even skin.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #96 series on my blog.

How you view yourself in your most natural state sets the tone for how to speak to yourself and the level of confidence you radiate when you step out into the world. For a moment, the red carpet darling struggled with accepting her bare face, so she challenged herself to forgo makeup when necessary.

When I was younger, I used to think that I needed to have a full face of makeup to love my most beautiful self. As I got older, I told myself I’m not going to allow myself to feel like I have to have makeup on all these different enhancements to feel beautiful and confident,” Ciara says. She admits she frequently used body wash and body lotion on her face, and dabbled in microdermabrasion occasionally. Despite efforts from her makeup artist, Yolonda Frederick, who serves on the OAM advisory board and suggested the singer start using eye creams (“I didn’t believe they actually worked”), it wasn’t until OAM’s inception that Ciara realized the power of a simple skincare routine, effective ingredients, and reliable skin experts.

It’s that three-pronged approach that OAM is based on. Two years in the making, OAM’s aim is to simplify your skincare routine with clinical-level formulas that make maintaining healthy skin less intimidating. 

When I talk about being on a mission to make clinical skincare simple, the idea is a simple, one-two step process is all that you need. We’re not going to overcomplicate things. Because honestly, when you go into the skincare stores, it is overwhelming. Where do I start?” she says. With the Vitamin C Hydrating Cleanser, of course. About 10 minutes into the interview, Ciara reaches for the interviewer’s hand to give an impromptu demonstration of the entire OAM regimen, starting with step one. Each bottle is designed with a numbering system (in the shape of a C) to help guide the consumer through the routine. 

The cleanser gets your makeup off really good, in one wash. If you have on eyeliner, that’s a little more tricky,” she warns. She’s correct; the rich foaming lather of the cleanser is a godsend for folks who typically wear more sheer foundation formulas or powders. Thicker formulas will need the assistance of cleansing oil, followed by the Vitamin C Hydrated Cleanser, which doesn’t leave your skin feeling stripped of its nutrients. 

I wanted a line that tells me the key things that I need for my skin to be radiant, to have that glow up, to be as smooth and even as possible, and to eliminate the dark circles and the lines,” she says. Enter: Vitamin C Brightening Pads. Designed to be the second step in the routine, these pads are lightly doused with OAM’s signature Tri-C Pro-Peptide Complex, which contains a mixture of peptides and three different forms of vitamin C, along with other active ingredients (like ascorbic acid in the Vitamin C Serum—step three). The potent use of vitamin C isn’t just a clever spin on the singer’s first initial.

Our bodies don’t produce vitamin C, so I wanted to create products with very unique, very special forms of vitamin C. The way it performs in our products is different. With the Tri-C Pro-Peptide Complex in all of the products, it releases vitamin C in micro doses throughout the day so your skin’s not getting irritated with the amount of vitamin C that it’s receiving. I call these the liquid gold for the face because it really is game-changing,” she explains. Don’t be intimidated by all this vitamin C talk—OAM is safe for sensitive skin. Ciara sampled the range throughout the pandemic and even during her pregnancy with her youngest child, Win. “More than anything, this stuff works. I literally was building up my line when I was pregnant in the pandemic, and that was the most sensitive skin I possibly ever had,” she says.

The singer speaks of the products’ ingredients and benefits with the knowledge of a student who’s never missed a day of class. It’s a testament to the board of trusted skin experts she personally selected to help her along this journey. Ciara, along with board-certified Dr. Tiffany Libby, former Sally Beauty VP of Digital Strategy and Innovation JC Johnson, celebrity makeup artist Yolonda Frederick, and a cosmetic chemist named Maha, married their respective passions to produce a line that’s not only backed by experts, but also addresses the concerns of women of color. 

Ciara admits she’s well aware of celebrity brand fatigue, but what sets OAM apart, she says, is that commitment to women of color. 

When I was preparing to launch, I had no idea there were that many celebrity skincare lines. But what I also realized is that there are only a few women of color skincare brands in this space. And for me, being a woman of color, I thought hopefully I can be a part of that great space where you’ll see more women of color-led brands. I don’t think that one person has to be doing it and only one person can win,” she adds. 

OAM’s range is priced between $28 to $62 for single products, with the option to buy the complete bundle for $160, available now on oamskin.com.

ELLE

‘Prince of Darkness’ Ozzy Osbourne Launches Line of Cosmetics

Heavy metal legend Ozzy Osbourne has debuted a makeup line in collaboration with Rock and Roll Beauty, complete with a coffin-shaped eye shadow palette.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #95 series on my blog.

The products are available at American beauty retailer Ulta and on Rock and Roll Beauty’s website, according to an Instagram post from the so-called “Prince of Darkness.”

The collection features dark shades and macabre packaging in line with the singer’s own style, which has often featured dramatic dark eye makeup looks.

And one item pays homage to one of the musician’s most memorable onstage moments: an eye shadow palette in the shape of a bat, just like the bat whose head Osbourne bit off while performing in Iowa in 1982.

The line also includes a handheld mirror, a skull-printed makeup bag, and three candles. 

Unfortunately for “Black Sabbath” fans, around half of the items in the collaboration are already sold out, as of Friday afternoon. 

Rock and Roll Beauty, an American makeup brand, has previously released makeup collections designed to celebrate Jimi Hendrix and Def Leppard.

CNN

Meet Evanie Frausto, Bella Hadid’s Go-To Hairstylist

Evanie Frausto is the reason why you want bubblegum-blue ringlets piled into towering proportions. Think of those extravagant pyramids of colourful confection – the sort you’d imagine Marie Antoinette dining on – but in wig form, and you have just one of the opulent looks Frausto created for Lil Nas X in his video for his hit single, “Montero (Call Me by Your Name)”. Let them wear wigs.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #94 series on my blog.

A master of the surreal, Frausto has turned Bella Hadid into Poison Ivy, and made artist and photographer Petra Collins brunette; styled model Aweng Ade-Chuol’s hair into peroxide blonde finger waves and locs, and gave Kendall Jenner such long hair extensions that they trailed on the ground behind her. “I push my work to be a little bit offbeat,” the Mexican-American hairstylist tells Vogue. “I hope that people will feel inspired by it.

Growing up in Orange County, California, Frausto moved to New York where he was taken under the wing of legendary hairstylist Jimmy Paul. Manipulating hair and wigs to sculptural effect, since embarking on a solo career, Frausto has worked for everyone from Fenty to Helmut Lang. Here, the rising star shares some of his proudest moments.

What was your earliest beauty memory?

I grew up with my mum and my grandmother and my mum’s four sisters, who are all glamorous. My mum never left the house without her makeup or her hair done. Just being surrounded by such powerful feminine energy made me see how transformative makeup and hair was.

Did you experiment with your own look?

When I was a teenager, I was influenced by the MySpace scene. It had such a specific look: it was so punk, but also I thought it was pretty — making your hair different bold colours and having piercings and wearing eyeliner. I was constantly changing my hair colour and putting new piercings in my face, and just playing around with self-expression.”

Were you confident in your pursuit of self-expression?

I grew up in a traditional Mexican household and everything that I was exploring was against that tradition. I was the first in my family to be born in the US, so it was confusing to still be in this household and yet be queer, different, and feel ‘other’. But once I found my community and my group of friends, I felt confident as that weirdo kid with the piercings and hair extensions.”

What drew you to hair specifically?

Hair was always the crown, the cherry on the cake – it’s a way of finishing off how I felt, it was a mood, a way of expression. I always gravitated towards it. Working with hair now, I love and appreciate the sculptural element of it, getting my hands in there and manipulating it.

How did you go from experimenting with hair to pursuing it as a career?

I owe it to my mentors. They introduced me to a world I never knew existed, especially Jimmy Paul. I fell into it accidentally; the only reason I went to hair school is that I was a crazy teenager and university in the US is so expensive. One thing led to another, I moved to New York and was pulled into the fashion industry.”

Do you approach hair as its own entity or do you view it as part of the whole look?

I see it both ways, especially working in fashion. Sometimes I get those shoots where I can just create the piece or make the sculpture. I’m fortunate to work with teams that trust me to do my thing, bring it to set and they work around it. But there’s definitely a part of it where I’m helping to bring out a specific look or mood. I’m very much into both.”

How would you describe your creative process?

I’ll talk to the stylist or the photographer, and they’ll give me the initial idea or mood. I work off feelings, so I’ll start doing something that’s in my head but if it starts to go another way, I just follow it. I go with the flow versus trying to mimic something exactly. I look for inspiration in everything and it changes.

There was a moment where I was looking through Instagram, but lately I’ve gotten into books and I’ve been going to thrift stores and vintage shops, hunting for old magazines. I just found this amazing Armani book – it’s so inspiring and a lot of it is stuff I haven’t seen on the internet. I also get inspired when I go back home to Orange County and visit the Mexican-American community. The hair looks are so specific to that community – like chunky highlights or warmer tones.”

What’s been your proudest moment so far?

Honestly, it’s such a hard question because I come from so little so every opportunity I get I’m excited about. I’m proud to be working with people I’ve looked up to and who inspire me like [Vogue Italia editor-at-large] Patti Wilson and Bella Hadid, and that I have such good relationships with.

When working with someone like Bella, how much of her personality plays into how you conceive a look?

Oh, a lot. She really works hard and she studies. Whenever I do something with her, I’ll have my references and then she’ll have her references, and we work it out together. I’m so open to being collaborative. I want the models to feel good so I always love hearing what they think.”

What do you want your work to say about beauty?

I can find beauty in everything. It’s more about a feeling or emotion versus trying to achieve something that’s beautiful. But at the end of the day, I find it beautiful. Beauty is embracing individuality and uniqueness, and not being afraid of things that make a person a little different.”

What are your hopes for the future in terms of your own career, and what are your hopes for the industry at large?

In terms of my own work, I hope to continue to grow and learn. One of my favourite parts of the job is meeting all the other creatives, so I want to continue to grow my relationships with people, and collaborate with people who inspire me. In terms of the industry, it’s been a crazy couple of years. The industry has been pushing for diversity and inclusivity, and I hope that it continues to evolve and grow.”

VOGUE

Gwen Stefani’s GXVE Beauty Unveils Digital Community Platform

The GXVE Community lets consumers share make-up looks while benefitting from a commission rate that is above the industry average.

GXVE Beauty, the colour cosmetics brand of musician Gwen Stefani, has launched The GXVE Community, a digital platform that lets consumers share unique make-up looks.

It also allows users to benefit financially through a commission rate claimed to be above the industry average.

The former No Doubt frontwoman said The GXVE Community came from a desire to interact with make-up fans in the digital age in a way that was not available in the early years of her career.

GXVE Beauty specialises in ‘clean’, high performance make-up and launched in March this year, backed by New Theory Ventures.

GXVE Beauty is the next chapter of my life,” said Stefani.

It’s an extension of my passion for being creative, for finding identity and being artistic. Make-up gives you the freedom to play the roles you want to play.”

She continued: “I’ve dreamed about the day of launching The GXVE Community and now it’s here.”

I wanted to partner up with the people who have been my partners all along. We’ve always had this exchange of love, whether it be through the music I’ve written or fashion and now beauty.”

If you love make-up and you love to be your own individual, you’re going to love this community and I can’t wait to see what everyone creates.”

To apply to The GXVE Community, consumers can visit the ‘Ambassador Program’ at the GXVEBeauty.com site. Selected ambassadors, known as ‘GXVERS’, will be granted access to the proprietary brand platform.

The platform offers both discovery and financial incentives.

Those selected as GXVERS gain exclusive access to videos from Stefani, as well as product education, application tutorials, social content, product images and the ability to share and engage in brand polls and chats.

GXVERS also receive 30% commission on any items sold via their ambassador link, one of the highest standardised rates in the industry.

According to the brand, there is no minimum social media following required to become a ‘GXVER’, simply a passion for make-up and a positive outlook.

COSMETICS BUSINESS

Hilary Duff Is ‘Here for’ This Cherry Vanilla Lip-Plumping Gloss That’s Packed with Anti-Aging Benefits

From her Lizzie McGuire days to her recent nude photo shoot for Women’s Health, Hilary Duff has always served up inspiration. And to be frank, we’d try pretty much anything she stands by.

So it shouldn’t be a big surprise that we’re all for the Lawless Cherry Vanilla Lip Gloss she posted on one of her latest Instagram stories, in which her plump pout had a flawless cherry-red shine. Duff’s selfie showing off the gloss was captioned, “here for the cherry vanilla lip gloss” to show she’s a big fan.

Not only does the $25 product plump your lips and add a light red tint, but it also has anti-aging benefits from the hyaluronic acid and shea butter in its formula that provide hydration and a soothing sensation. Plus, over time, it can help alleviate irritation, increase lip volume by 40 percent, and decrease lines when used consistently, according to the brand. And you can never go wrong with an ultra-shiny finish to top off any makeup look.

Apply the product on its own for a glossy sheer tint, or add it on top of your favorite lipstick to give your lips a fuller and more vibrant look. To reap the anti-aging benefits, you can also wear it while you sleep.

Buy It! Lawless Forget The Filler Lip Plumper Line Smoothing Gloss in Cherry Vanilla, $25; sephora.com

Along with Duff, the popular lip product is a favorite of more than 66,000 Sephora shoppers. One five-star reviewer reported that their lips looked “twice as big” after experiencing the gloss’ “phenomenal plumping effect.” Another satisfied customer wrote that it “doesn’t burn or hurt like other lip plumpers” and they highlighted how much they enjoyed that it also adds pigment.

A plumping lip gloss with anti-aging benefits is enough to have us sold, and the fact that Duff and thousands of Sephora shoppers are fans too is just a huge bonus. The $25 purchase might be your new holy grail makeup item of the summer and beyond.

PEOPLE