Beyoncé’s Makeup Artist Sir John Swears by These Five Makeup Essentials

I always say that beauty is a feeling,” notes celebrity makeup artist Sir John on his beauty philosophy. “The way we make people feel is a destination—you become a destination of energy when you can do that.” While the pro is most known for his work with Beyoncé—including her glam at the 2022 Oscars and her British Vogue cover—he has garnered quite a Rolodex of star clientele. Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Serena Williams, Zendaya, and Naomi Campbell (who happened to be his first celebrity client), to name a few, have all sported his glam on endless magazine covers, music videos, and red carpets. Not to mention a slew of brand partnerships with L’Oréal, Barbie, and MAC.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #91 series on my blog.

And the sought-after makeup pro doesn’t have any plans on slowing down anytime soon. “One thing I know about life, especially at this big, grown age of mine, is that the finish line continues to get pushed back,” he continues. “There’s a Roman saying: never rely on past glory. Yesterday’s win is yesterday’s win. No matter what I did yesterday, that’s cool, but I’m really obsessed about what’s next.” Following two decades of experience, he’s adding another role to his ever-evolving resume: chief creative officer of Ctzn Cosmetics—driven by his commitment to building equity and diversity in the industry.

Founded in 2019 by a trio of sisters, the brand seeks to create products inclusive to people of color, inspired by their South Asian heritage. “I loved how authentically compelling they were when it came to what [they] want to champion for people who don’t always get invited to the party,” he says of his appointment. Sir John’s decision to join a promising up-and-coming brand, to him, is a reflection of the evolving beauty landscape.

He continues to say that he’s seen so many shifts in the industry throughout his career—noting specifically the emergence of men’s makeup. “I love the fact that we live in an era of exploration, where everyone can have a vehicle to make them feel better about who they see in the mirror,” he says. So, it’s clear Sir John is eager to create safer, more inclusive spaces and share the wealth of knowledge he’s learned—from normalizing Botox and filler to dishing his best makeup tips.

I love making the eyes look like different shapes with liners,” he explains. “Liners would be my favorite thing to do if I didn’t have any other makeup on me.” He’s particularly enjoying how people are playing with colored, whimsical liners on TikTok. “Also, my ultimate hack is making sure you set concealer with loose powder—never pressed powder. It’s too heavy under the eyes and drying.” Otherwise, he has a penchant for what he dubs invisible sculpting: “I love the way I sculpt and contour; you’re not supposed to see it but rather offer structure.” To do this, he will do a cream sculpt, then buff in a taupe or cooler colored tone to create dimension on the face.

Sir John’s approach to makeup has transformed in tandem with the industry and his clients. When asked if he thinks Beyoncé’s look has evolved over time, his response is “abso-fucking-lutely.” Though he admits she certainly knows what she wants, he has learned how to not only have conviction but consistently soak in new knowledge. His biggest advice? “Have faith in your eye, in your references you’re pulling. Where do you want to take this person?

With that, Sir John gave Vogue a sneak peek into his makeup kit—including his five must-have products.

1. Uoma Beauty Double Take Contour Stick

  • Key Benefits: “These are the best for sculpting,” says Sir John. “I sculpt and bronze with everything that looks like this. I’ll take a tiny bit on the back of my hand, and I’ll start to buff wherever I want that shadow.
  • More to Know: A lychee fruit extract-infused dual-ended contour and highlight stick to illuminate and shape the face.

2. Fenty Beauty Match Stix Matte Contour Skinstick

  • Key Benefits: The Fenty Beauty Match Stix is another top pick of his for his signature sculpted contour. For a lasting lifted appearance, he sets the cream contour with a cool-toned powder to keep everything in place all day or night.
  • More to Know: A buildable cream-to-powder contour stick that delivers a matte finish.

3. REN Clean Skincare Glycol Lactic Radiance Renewal Mask

  • Key Benefits: “This is amazing,” says Sir John. “It literally resurfaces your skin immediately; even if you’re super sensitive, it’s not a problem. I’ve been using it for years.”
  • More to Know: An exfoliating mask powered by a blend of glycolic acid from pineapple extract, lactic acid from passion fruit, and papain from papaya to refine skin texture and improve radiance.

4. MAC Fluidline Eye Liner Gel

  • Key Benefits: “I love this because it doesn’t move, it doesn’t go anywhere,” says Sir John. He recounts etching a perfect cat eye while on Beyonce’s On The Run tour using this pot and MAC’s liner in Graphblack. “[The liner] didn’t move through two hours of cardio. They’re worth their weight in gold.”
  • More to Know: A waterproof, smudge-resistant gel pigment formulated for up to 16-hour wear.

5. NARS Radiant Creamy Concealer

  • Key Benefits: Sir John counts this NARS concealer as one of his favorites, along with its matte pot formula. Pro tip: just make sure the under-eye is properly hydrated before applying.
  • More to Know: A creamy concealer infused with balancing and light-diffusing powders, along with magnolia bark extract, grape seed extract, and vitamin E to hydrate, brighten, and correct.

VOGUE

Pat McGrath Is Launching Her First Skincare Product – And Naomi Campbell Is Already A Fan

For all the follows and likes Pat McGrath generates around her make-up artistry every season (Julia Fox’s internet-breaking black eyeliner didn’t just happen), it’s the skin quality she has pioneered over the course of her storied career that is perhaps her biggest calling card. Hydrated, but not oily; smooth, but realistic, with a make-up-priming moisture quality that is “lightweight yet nourishing,” McGrath explains. Much like she developed a seven-step lipstick technique to achieve the ultimate in petal-soft pigment, McGrath has been cocktailing her own skincare formula for her entire career, layering simple creams spiked with rose water to create a quick-penetrating emulsion. And just as that signature make-up technique became Pat McGrath Labs’ best-selling MatteTrance Lipstick, her patented skin prep has finally been bottled. 

Called Divine Skin Rose 001 and formulated by a Korean lab, the milky liquid that will launch on patmcgrath.com on 29 April closely resembles a blendable essence, formulated with 92 percent naturally derived ingredients; shake it up, and a ceramide-boosted oil phase combines with an antioxidant-spiked rose water phase to create McGrath’s replenished, rebalanced glow. 

The truth is I’ve been working on skin care as long as I have been working in make-up,” admits McGrath, who has tweaked her formula not in focus groups but on supermodels, including Naomi Campbell, who stars in the campaign for the rose-tinted glass bottle. “I wouldn’t use anything else,” says Campbell — which is high praise considering Campbell is serious about her skincare, specifically her hydration. “You never want your skin to look dried out. It’s not attractive. It’s unbecoming,” she says. Here, Campbell reveals how she’s been using the uniquely textured essence, and why after all these years in the business, good sleep might be the real secret to good skin. 

As someone who has been on countless sets with Pat and at countless shows with Pat, what is her point of difference when it comes to skin finish?

When you work with Pat, before you she puts make-up on you, she really massages your skin — she loves glowy, dewy skin. So your make-up goes on smoother, everything just rolls. That’s her secret: that the skin still looks like skin and you see you and that’s important, I feel. That’s what I love about her; she never makes me matte. When you’re too matte you lose the whole person. Your make-up becomes like a mask. Pat’s make-up never looks like that.

As a McGrath Muse and, perhaps even more importantly, a Pat McGrath confidant, were you at all a part of tweaking early incarnations of her first skin-care product?

She’s been trying this out on me for a while now so I’ve had a bit of a head start in using it in my skin regime. We were actually using it last year when we were doing the Divine Rose make-up launch, but I couldn’t talk about it then, so I’m so excited that I can say all of this now. The cat’s outta the bag! In the beginning, she would ask me things like, “How does it feel? How long did it stay on?” But it’s really always been so easy — and it goes on the skin, but it also goes in the skin. 

It just makes everything glowy and plump, which is important for me because I’m on set all the time, and I’m in front of lights, and I’m on planes, and my skin dries out and it gets really dehydrated no matter how much water I drink. Drink water, drink water. I never drink enough. My test is really traveling, though — how often do I need to reapply something on the plane so my skin feels hydrated. I usually sleep straight through flights and with this, I’d wake up and still have the shine.

It is not an exaggeration to say that your skin is, in fact, divine. Drop the routine!

It’s about clean for me. I cleanse in the morning and I cleanse at night. You’ve got to get the make-up off! And I need products that help make my skin look good without make-up, because I don’t wear make-up when I’m not working. I just put little bits where I want to cover blemishes so my skin can breathe. My next step is usually a serum, and sometimes I use the Essence first, before my serum, and sometimes I mix it with my serum and put it on together. You can top it off with a cream if you like, but in the summertime you don’t need to. The Essence is enough. 

I watched an amazing clip on your YouTube channel about some of your pre-runway body prep including an incredible lymphatic drainage massage. Are there any treatments that you regularly engage in for your face in tandem with good skin care?

I try to do my facials — you need to if you’re travelling, or you’re in the sun a lot. I don’t wear a lot of sunblock on my skin because I break out from sunblock. So I like people to extract because you have to clean out your pores sometimes! And I do microneedling every once in a while, too.

These days, so much of good skin care comes down to good self-care. How do you prioritise yourself with such a busy work schedule — and a newborn at home! — not just physically but mentally and spiritually?

The water thing is huge for me, and I’m always, like, how can I make water fun? Growing up I wasn’t really raised on soda so we always had cordials that we mixed with water, and that’s what I still drink. And I try to eat the right food and take the right vitamins — vitamin D, vitamin C, B, zinc, fish oils. Good skin is so much about what you eat, too. And sleep! I try to get as much sleep as possible even though I have a young one now. When I was younger I really didn’t need that much sleep, but now I like my sleep. It kickstarts things and helps me be enthusiastic about the day ahead.

VOGUE

8 Cat Eyeliner Tricks To Make Your Eyes Look Bigger And More Striking

The eyes have always had it, but in the age of ongoing face mask-wearing, extra attention is being paid to the gaze. In lieu of red lips, it’s perennially classic and universally flattering cat eyeliner that’s receiving renewed focus. “Now more than ever, eyeliner is the most effective tool to instantly enhance the shape of the eyes, express our mood, and accentuate our unique individuality,” says Gina Brooke, who paints winged eyes on clients including Cate Blanchett and Sofia Boutella. From creating a flattering base to drawing on the perfect eye-elongating wing, here pro makeup artists reveal their tricks for nailing cat eyeliner.

Start by tightlining

To begin, make-up artist Emily Cheng, who works with Yara Shahidi and Laura Harrier, recommends tightlining, also known as the invisible eyeliner technique, which consists of “applying eyeliner in between the lashes” to make them appear thicker and fuller at the roots. It will create a base for a richer, longer-lasting cat-eye look.

Swipe on a natural eyeshadow

After pro Tasha Reiko Brown (who works with Alicia Keys and Tracee Ellis Ross) tightlines, she adds a sheer swipe of a light, natural eyeshadow on the lids for a clean backdrop to add contrast. “Use a domed eyeshadow brush to apply a warm natural brown in the crease,” instructs Brown. To double down on brightening the eye area, Brooke recommends adding a neutral, flesh-toned liner at the inner corners of the eye, as well as to the lower inner perimeter to instantly open the eyes and ultimately create the illusion of larger eyes. “Using a gradation for colour and smudging the liner away from the upper and lower lash lash line will widen the eyes and provide a fresh, wide-eyed appearance,” she says.

Find the right texture

While there’s power in choice, sometimes it can be overwhelming to decide what type of eyeliner — easy-to-apply pencil, precise felt-tip liquid, or creamy gel with a brush — will be best for your desired cat-eye result. “The right tools and texture can make all the difference,” confirms Brooke, who prefers to use a soft angled nylon fiber lip brush with gel eyeliner for application. 

Often, Cheng will take a hybrid approach. “I’ll start a wing with liquid liner and blend up and out with a black shadow,” she explains. “This will also contribute to making the eyes looking larger without the eyeliner looking like one large block.” Brown has a similar dual-minded approach, laying the groundwork with a kohl pencil before adding a layer of liquid liner, concentrating it at the base of the lashes for “sharply defined liner with a diffused edge.” 

No matter what, though, it’s about finding the right balance between what’s easiest to apply for you and your desired result.

Choose your shade

The most flattering shades are the ones you feel most confident in,” insists Brown. That being said, universally you can’t go wrong with warm, rich, deep browns to bring warmth around the eye. “It defines the eye without pulling focus and has more of a subtlety than black,” she says. For a similarly soft effect, Cheng recommends deep maroon as an alternative for a striking pop. But for the most part, she tends to stick to the ultimate classic, a highly-pigmented black liner, for a “sharp and clean” effect.

Strategise shape and lift

The intention of winged liner is to elongate the eye. To do so with optimal results, “Start with liner at the innermost corner and drag out slightly past the end of eye,” instructs Brown. “The line should be ultra-thin at the inner eye and gradually become slightly thicker as you move outwards.” One point that Brown drives home is that the tail end of liner doesn’t necessarily have to flick upwards in a cat eye motion. 

The tail end should angle slightly upwards and out for elongated eyes with a gentle lift,” says Brown. Before actually drawing on the flick or wing, really think about what kind of “lifted” look you want to achieve in the end. “Following rules of thumb for certain eye shapes won’t necessarily work in your favour as each face is a unique creation and other facial factors come into play,” she explains. “Really take a moment to analyse your face and your desired results and plan your technique from there.

Add the flick or wing

To keep steady and trace on your ideal shape, Cheng recommends keeping your eye open and looking into the mirror with a relaxed face before attempting to sculpt the shape. “Following the curve of your bottom waterline and sweeping upward is a good place to start in finding the angle of your eyeliner,” explains Cheng. “This way you’ll avoid going too straight or too angled upwards, unless that is the look you are going for. I find following the waterline to be the most natural and flattering.”

Another thing to consider is if you want a crisp or diffused edge — the latter, which Cheng calls a “soft baby wing” delivers a softer, sheerer finish. “It instantly defines your eyes and it’s an easy way to create shape,” she says.

Clean it up and refine

No matter what your desired effect is, a tapered point Q-tip will be your best friend to clean up errors, as well as sharpen lines and shapes. “When I have a liner that has gotten too thick or to correct any mistakes, I’ll take a pointed make-up Q-tip dampened with micellar water and refine the line,” says Brown, cautioning that you should be wary of using traditional Q-tips as the fibers can get caught in mascara on lashes and travel into the eye. 

Additionally, eschew make-up remover, which can disturb the surrounding make-up around the line too much and leave an oily residue (stick to micellar water instead). Another tried-and-true technique is harnessing the correcting and contrast-creating power of concealer. “Finishing with concealer underneath will also accentuate the liner,” says Cheng.

Finish with mascara

The final touch is mascara. After liner has dried, curl the lashes if desired, then wiggle it on. “The end result will give you depth and definition around the eye, and lashes that standout against brightened lids,” says Brown. For an eye-widening, wing-accenting curve, Cheng suggests “concentrating mascara on the outer corner, which will help elongate,” she says.

VOGUE

How To Paint Eye Make-up Like Monet, According To The Ulla Johnson Runway

As a blanket of snow fell upon Bryant Park just outside, the Ulla Johnson runway supplied showgoers with a soothing respite at the New York Public Library. Inside the grand marble lobby, the winding runway was punctuated by towers of mimosas and dotted with abstract wood sculptures by Alma Allen, while the soulful sounds of singer PawPaw Rod and smokey aroma of Astier de Villatte incense wafted through the air.

Above this season’s slouchy mohair pullovers, psychedelic-print taffeta dresses, and lush cocoon coats, there was a feast of beauty details supplying Johnson’s signature bohemian romance with an unexpected edge. Hairstylist Bob Recine crafted a lineup of chic styles including sleek, fabric-wrapped low ponytails; choppy, asymmetrical bobs; and waist-grazing braids embellished with polished stone charms. Playing off the collection’s neutrals, nails were painted in Tenoverten’s Canal, a creamy nude in total harmony with Johnson’s warm, earthy world.

The most dramatic statement came by way of the eyes, with make-up artist Romy Soleimani administering sharp, graphic cat-eyes flicks characterised by a tiny dash of negative space along the lower lash line. “It’s a bit tough,” she explained while etching on the shape using Bobbi Brown’s carbon black Ink Liner Pen. “Everything Ulla does is soft and romantic, so I like to add a little bit of hardness.” But for some models, that was just the beginning.

Monet-like, Impressionistic,” is how Soleimani described the soft-focus, two-tone “watercolour-y” treatments she proceeded to bestow on a few select gazes. She began by haphazardly tapping on a matte, pale greige pigment with a blending brush, before layering on finger-smudged swipes of metallic gold along the inner corners and brow bone. “I wanted them to feel not too colourful, not too earthy – more minimal and futuristic,” she said. The face was finished with fresh, healthy skin enhanced with a “high flush” on the upper cheekbones, blended with Luxe Matte Lipstick in pink-coral Bitten Peach and Crushed Lip Colour in cool pink Buff, each tying back to tones in the collection, and a dab of Extra Repair Eye Cream Intense on temples for a “natural sheen.”

While the prospect of painting on Impressionist-inspired eye make-up sounds intimidating, making like Monet is closer to child’s play than you think, stresses Soleimani. “It’s spontaneous,” she says, “like finger painting.” And just like that…this editor already has plans to embellish her next cat-eye with a dose of off-kilter colour and a gilded brow bone highlight.

VOGUE

Will the Return of Y2K Beauty Bring Back Ultra-Thin Eyebrows?

The noughties were a take-no-prisoners time for our brows; we wielded our tweezers with abandon, and many of us, regrettably, reduced our arches to razor-thin tadpoles.

We know better now, you might think, but with the Y2K redux upon us—#Y2K has now amassed almost 5 billion views on TikTok—the fated cycling of trends, and Bella Hadid leading the skinny power-brow charge, it might be time to revisit your brow shape with a fresh new perspective.

It seems inevitable that, eventually, the natural brow is going to have to succumb to the tweezer again,” says makeup artist Troy Surratt. Trust that Surratt, a protégé of Kevyn Aucoin, knows a thing or two about pencil-thin brows. After all, Aucoin was the one who helped popularize them in the ’90s as he made up the faces of the most iconic supers of the time—Kate Moss, Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, and Linda Evangelista. “There was a time that we decided together that everyone needed to look like Carole Lombard and have really skinny eyebrows,” recalled designer and collaborator Isaac Mizrahi in the Larger Than Life: The Kevyn Aucoin Story. “The next thing I knew, [Aucoin] was plucking everybody’s eyebrows.

After the millennium, fashionably crafted brows started to get a bit more mathematical. “In the early ’00s, brow-shaping experts were gaining notoriety and creating a sort of diktat that the eyebrow should start straight above the tear duct of the eye, the highest point of the arch should be at the edge of the iris, and the ‘tail’ of the brow should taper off,” explains Surratt, adding that brows were then shaped accordingly to “formulaic perfection,” using a wax, tweezer, threading, or even a combination of all three. The pro? “This thinner, more preened eyebrow look can have an overall eye brightening effect,” says Surratt of the best case scenario, adding that it also creates more real estate for intense eyeshadow or bold liner looks. The con? “Brows that are overly sharp or angled may result in an overall harsh or aggressive effect on the face,” he says.

L.A. brow expert Kristie Streicher, who has observed more than a few Gen Zers keen on “going thin,” believes there is a place for the spirit of Y2K-era beauty, within reason. “I love seeing this on runways and in editorials,” says Streicher, “but…it’s just not practical for everyday life.” She goes on to emphasize that one’s natural brow shape is typically in proportion with their features. “There are people who naturally have more of a defined and smaller brow, which is usually matched with smaller, more defined features,” she explains. “It can look stark and be ‘a lot of face’ when not naturally occurring on someone as well as a lot to maintain!

Dani Kimiko Vincent, the longtime artist behind Sandra Oh’s arches, is in agreement. “There is a ‘best brow’ for your face structure, and that’s usually the brow you had before making any major modifications,” says Vincent. “I don’t believe in straying too far from one’s natural shape.” While she doesn’t see the intensely skinny brows of the ’90s and Y2K becoming commonplace, Vincent does see natural brow shapes, which include thinner brows, making a comeback “almost as a counter to the full brow aesthetic that has been going strong for some time now,” she says. She also underlines that thin brows have historically been associated with various counter cultures, from the brassy flappers of the ’20s to various punk scenes. “I believe people are feeling freer to embrace their individuality, and with uncertainty about the future, we are perhaps nostalgic for those playful and simpler-seeming times,” she says. Editorial makeup artist Jen Myles, who often works with Hadid, also sees the beauty in the pencil-thin arch comeback. “I think everyone’s ready for a change, a more manicured, ultra-groomed look,” says Myles of switching things up after years of abundantly thick arches. “For anyone who hasn’t microbladed or spent the entire last decade growing back, their brows may be ready to embrace the Y2K look.” As we navigate the changing brow landscape, here are a few pro-approved strategies for exploring the Y2K trend with a 2022 perspective (and plenty of caution).

Go Easy on Your Brows

Old habits die hard, even a decade or two later. If you’re tempted to go dramatically thinner, strongly consider dropping the tweezers and consulting a professional who can offer subtle tweaks. “After helping thousands of women, as well as myself, to grow back their natural brows after the ’90s had ravaged them, and knowing firsthand the damage that over-tweezing and waxing can cause, I would strongly caution against pulling out the hair to experiment,” says Streicher. Instead of removing the hair, she suggests styling brows into a thinner, more defined shape by brushing the hairs down and over or pinching the hairs together into a thin line. If you have very full, thick brows and want to explore, she says to try dermaplaning or shaving the hairs to prevent permanently damaging the hair follicle.

This new brow trend inspired by the early aughts should be thought of in a kinder, gentler version of its predecessor—more directional and uplifting, less severe or architectural,” agrees Surratt. “It should maintain a subtlety and softness, that is what makes it current.

Soften Your Fill-In

A modern interpretation of the Y2K brow aesthetic could include less intense filling with products and narrowing the shape by concentrating the fill well within the core brow,” says Vincent. “Without removing hair, you can play with the intensity and placement of the arch, simply by strategically applying your brow makeup.” The key tool for doing this is a fine pencil that allows you to draw individual hairs and create a full brow that still looks natural. It is also versatile enough to create precise definition if you are experimenting with different looks, like a thin brow, she adds.

Up Your Tame Game

Whether brows are penciled or bare, I always recommend a clear gel for style and hold, as it can lift and add fullness where hairs may have been drooping or can alternatively be used to create a slimmer brow,” says Vincent. If you want a product that adds a hint of color for increased definition as you set, Myles’s go-to is neat strokes of Glossier’s Boy Brow. “A few swipes and brows are set in place with just the right amount of tinted color.”

Promote (Yes!) Healthy Hair Growth

Thick or skinny, a little TLC goes a long way to preserving the health of your brows. For light brow exfoliation, Streicher recommends using a soft spoolie brush to gently brush hairs in an upward motion, which can remove dead skin cells that tend to accumulate under and around the hair shaft. “This will also stimulate the brow skin area and increase blood flow to strengthen and promote healthy hair growth,” she says. Next, Streicher encourages her clients to massage a nourishing oil, like her Vitamin E–rich Afore Oil, or supercharged serum, into the brow area daily. “It can protect, moisturize, and maintain healthy, strong hair growth.” Your future brows, no matter what shape they take, will thank you.

VOGUE

The 5 Secrets To “No Make-Up” Make-Up, According To Lisa Eldridge

There are beauty wonderlands and then there is celebrity make-up artist Lisa Eldridge’s House of Eldridge, a pop-up in London’s Covent Garden, which takes the definition to new heights. With a lipstick lounge, bedecked in rich velvet fabrics (and a lip-shaped sofa – one for the Pinterest interiors board); a selection of her personal collection of vintage make-up, including thousand-year-old compacts and blushers from the 1920s; all of her eponymous make-up line available to try (along with expert colour matching); her beautiful jewellery collection; and soon, professional talks on all manner of subjects – there is something for everyone in the beauty dream world she has created.

It’s something a bit different from a normal beauty stand in a department store,” she tells Vogue over Zoom. “It’s not merchandised, just an insight into my world. There are over a thousand pieces from my vintage make-up collection, some of which I am selling, and areas with different themes. Plus there is a replica of my studio in the back – it’s exactly like people may have seen on Instagram where I used to film my YouTube videos.

One of Eldridge’s calling cards is effortless, fresh make-up that is so imperceptible, no one would ever know her clients are wearing it. She works with everyone from Dua Lipa and Alexa Chung, to Winnie Harlow and Rosie Huntington-Whiteley on their luminous complexions, and is equally glowy-skinned herself. So what are her tips on how we can emulate the look at home?

1. Prep is important

One of her top tips is to start with your skincare routine. “Making sure that your skin is well hydrated and moisturized is important,” she says. “Without that, you can’t get the products to behave the way you want them to.”

2. Work with your real skin

For a no make-up make-up effect, Eldridge advises applying your foundation only in the areas it’s needed – generally in the centre of the face. “For me, it’s around my nose, mouth and chin area and a little bit on the forehead,” she says, name-checking her new Foundation as a great product to try. “It’s not a tinted moisturizer or a full coverage formula, but something in the middle that you can sheer out if you want to. It self sets, so you don’t need to powder on top of it. I really like it because it doesn’t feel like you’ve got any make-up on, but it’s still got good coverage.” She applies with her fingers or a flat brush.

3. Don’t be afraid to mix formulas up

If you’re struggling to achieve the right (lightweight) consistency in your base product, Eldridge suggests adding some moisturizer into it. This trick also helps reduce that cakey finish when certain foundations cling to dry or flaky skin.

4. Highlight

A new wave of highlighters nourish the skin while imparting the ultimate dewy sheen for a look that says “healthy”, rather than overdone. “I always use a highlighter on the high points of the cheeks – a subtle one, that doesn’t have any glitter in it – and I apply it on the nose, in the corners of eyes, and on top of the lip to create a dewy look.

5. Create an outdoorsy flush

A make-up artist essential, cream blush is the best route to go down for a natural flush. Eldridge swears by her own Enlivening Blush – in the shade Pink Soap – which she applies with fingers, building up thin layers to create the right texture and finish.

VOGUE

Prepare to Burn For This ‘Bridgerton’-Inspired Makeup Line From Pat McGrath

Regencycore swept the nation almost a year ago as Bridgerton hit our screens. By “us” I mean the collective as I’ve grown to see. We worshipped at the altar of corsets, feathered headbands and empire-length gowns, and developed an intense love of the smouldering Duke of Hastings—and we were not alone. The Mother of makeup—and British Vogue’s beauty editor-at-large—Dame Pat McGrath, was right with us too, and conjuring up ideas for her next makeup collaboration as she watched. 

Yep, the new Bridgerton X Pat McGrath Labs collection is everything you want it to be and more. Comprising a next-level eyeshadow palette (named Diamond of the First Water, in homage to the very first episode of the hit show), blush palette (Love at First Blush), and a duo of highlighters (Sublime Skin Highlighter) to gild the face, all three deliver the beautifully blendable, butter-soft gel-cream formulas that McGrath does so well. And they make achieving fresh, Regency-esque skin (with a modern twist) a breeze.

For McGrath, the Bridgerton look is all about eye blusher: “Blushing isn’t just for rosy cheeks anymore,” she tells Vogue. “And I suspect that Bridgerton made the eyes of its 63 million-strong viewership blush. Every shade in the MTHRSHP Eye Palette, Diamond of the First Water, is designed to accomplish just that. These shades were created to drape the cheeks and eyes in divine warmth and illuminate the eyes.” Her top tip is to apply shades “Art of the Swoon” and “Love Match” as a wash of color across the eyes for a gentle flush.

In fact, eye blusher is the trend to try for skin that radiates subtle health. A method which can be built up for high-impact glamour or used as a subtle hint of colour, it draws attention to the eyes and harmonizes the face. “It is perfect for creating the effect of emotion coming from within the skin,” McGrath adds. Of course, she has been doing it for years, and name-checks Dior’s 2004 and 2005 couture shows for some past examples.

Fronting the campaign for the launch are McGrath’s muses, Ava Philippe (who is Reese Witherspoon’s daughter, and her doppelgänger), and model Vinetria Chubbs, both of whom embody the spirit of the collection, according to McGrath. “Can you imagine the sheer pleasure of being on set with such a captivating group of intelligent, confident future legends? So much about this collection is about the idea of making your debut and celebrating what makes you special—it was wonderful to work with such a brilliant mix of talent on a modern take on Regency era beauty, while reveling in their iconic individuality.” In true Bridgerton spirit, she calls the pair a “divinely diverse range of dynamic #DowntownDebutantes”—and we are here for it.

Available to buy from December 26 on Patmcgrath.com, the new range is limited-edition, so get in there fast. Mother, for one, is excited: “It’s such an honor to collaborate with Shondaland and Netflix on the Pat McGrath Labs X Bridgerton Collection,” she tells Vogue. “Shonda’s commitment to diversity, inclusion and disruptive thinking aligns with my own brand, as outspoken voices for body positivity, racial diversity, gender variance and iconoclastic individuality. She passionately invites people to see the past, present and future through a new lens.” Regencycore beauty? It’s a yes from me.

VOGUE

Bobbi Brown’s No Make-Up Make-Up Brand Finally Arrives In London

Last October, four years since she left her namesake brand, and 25 years since her non-compete with Estee Lauder expired, Bobbi Brown launched her new beauty venture in the US. This week, after much anticipation, Jones Road, named after a street in East Hampton, launches in the UK.

I am a total Anglophile,” the legendary make-up artist tells Vogue over zoom. “I have a not-so-secret obsession with the UK. I love it. It’s my favourite place. And I’m just so excited because I know that this range is going to do really well, because it’s so timely.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #71 series on my blog.

Jones Road is exactly what you’d expect from the woman who invented the “no-make-up make-up” look back in the ’90s: a collection of clean, high-grade formulations designed with ease of use in mind. Only this time around, Brown wants us to wear even less.

In the last four or five years, I realized how much less make-up I was wearing and how much better I looked,” she says. “My vision of make-up has changed, and I want to teach and inspire women how you don’t have to look like you’re wearing make-up.”

Three decades ago, no make-up make-up meant natural make-up. Now in 2021, Brown’s signature look has been distilled into just nine core products, including an inky black mascara, a face pencil that can blend away blemishes, an ultra lightweight lipgloss, and a light reflecting Miracle Balm that can be worn, well, anywhere you like.

It’s a new way of empowerment,” Brown says of her minimalist edit. “I’m someone that thinks a lot. And, of course, I was like, oh my god, what if people say, ‘Oh, there’s hardly any make-up there.’ But it’s what I believed in, it’s what I wanted to stand for. And it’s what I really wanted to bring to the world.

Earlier this year, the brand expanded to include five skincare products, a small collection of make-up brushes and some merch.

Nothing is out of the question,” Brown says with a wry smile of the future of her new brand. “If something is interesting and cool, we’ll try it.” Until then, here are some fan favourites.

Miracle Balm

Aptly named Miracle Balm, this light-reflecting super balm provides a wash of soft-focus moisture. Incredibly easy to use and endlessly versatile, glide it over your cheeks, lips, or eyelids for a dewy glow or light tint. In fact, you can use it all over.

The Miracle Balm is what ignited me to say, ‘Oh my god, this is different.’” Brown says. “I started giving my friends little pots of it and they would come back saying, ‘Please, sir, can I have some more?’ And I just knew I had something. It’s for people that don’t like a lot of make-up. Some days I only use the balm.”

Made with jojoba seed oil, argan oil and vitamin E, the Miracle Balm comes in four alluring shades: Au Naturel, Dusty Rose, Brown and Tawny. A must for summer.

The Face Pencil

I can’t live without the Face Pencils,” Brown deadpans. “You know when you get that tired look under your eyes? As soon as I put on the Face Pencil I look better. And it doesn’t look like make-up. I could use it all over my face if I wanted to and I still wouldn’t look like I’m wearing make-up.”

Made with shea butter and castor seed oil, and available in 25 shades, this ultra blendable Face Pencil covers everything from redness to dark spots, corrects discoloration, and lightens the darkest of circles – all the while remaining imperceptible on the skin. Just spot it on and blend it down with your fingers.

Cool Gloss

It’s rare to find a lip gloss that delivers the perfect shine without becoming tacky. But Brown’s Cool Gloss does exactly that. Lightweight and moisturising, this plumping gloss practically melts on the mouth.

I don’t like running around promoting that it’s clean, but it is,” Brown says. “I am a crazy health nut, I am a certified health coach. I am someone that really believes that good ingredients make the biggest difference in health, wellness, and just everything, from how it smells to how it feels.

Made with shea butter, vitamin E, and peppermint oil – which gives it its cooling sensation – the gloss comes in a variety of shades and can even be dabbed over the cheeks for an extra shine.

Hippie Stick

When Brown talks about the Hippie Stick, she lights up. “The packaging is my favourite. The lab sent it to me and I just fell in love with it.” A universal balm that can be used all over the body (Brown flags the heels and elbows as being the most important), the face and even your hair, Hippie Stick is the moisturizer to end all moisturizers. Made from shea butter, sunflower seed oil and coconut oil, it’s lightweight, buttery and smells irresistible. What’s not to love?

VOGUE

6 Ways To Make Your Foundation Look Like a Second Skin

Parisian makeup artist Violette’s top secret for how to apply foundation? Execute it without a trace. “I want people to say, ‘Oh my god, your skin looks amazing!’ not, ‘Your foundation is so great,’” she explains. And while finding the perfect formula is half the battle, once you have it, making like Houdini and ensuring it vanishes into your complexion is just as crucial. Here, three in-demand makeup artists share their fine-tuned tips for how to apply foundation and achieve that ever-elusive, second-skin finish.

Create a glowing canvas

Clean and moisturized skin is a no-brainer, but to really supercharge your glow, begin with a hydrating mask and follow it up with a lymphatic facial massage. When makeup artist Nina Park works with clients such as Zoë Kravitz and Bella Hadid, she begins with a sheet mask specifically targeted to their skin type, with ingredients such as rose to combat oiliness, aloe to treat dryness, and green tea to soothe inflammation. After masking, gently massage your moisturizer into the skin to boost circulation and reduce puffiness. “It creates a natural flush that makes the face look more awake,” says makeup artist Kira Nasrat, who helps give Jessica Alba that perpetually luminous complexion.

Prime as needed

To prime or not to prime? It’s an eternal question for amateurs and pros alike. While Violette typically skips the extra base step in the interest of using as little product as possible, when applied correctly, it can prolong foundation for all-day wear. “I use an anti-shine primer for hotspots like the forehead, hairline, sides of nose, and around the mouth, and then a sheer, illuminating one for the tops of the cheekbones,” explains Park, adding that she applies each with her fingertips.

Apply from the centre and move outward

Only apply foundation where it’s really necessary, insists Violette, who counts Estée Lauder Futurist Hydra Rescue Moisturizing Foundation with SPF 45 among her favourites. “Start in the centre of the face, on the apples of the cheeks, and slowly blend out,” she instructs, adding that another key part of the face is the area around the mouth, which is prone to yellow undertones and shadows. To ensure the foundation looks as natural as possible, Violette often skips the bridge of the nose — letting freckles show through for those who have them — and the corners of the nostrils, so the pigment doesn’t cling to dry patches.

Don’t paint, buff

No matter what tool you’re using — a foundation brush, a BeautyBlender, or your fingers — buff (or bounce, if you’re using a sponge) the foundation into your skin as opposed to “painting” it on to build coverage smoothly and avoid streakiness, says Park.

Strobe wherever the sun hits

For dimension, blend highlighter onto the high planes of the face that catch light naturally, such as the cheekbones, temples, and Cupid’s bow. “I’m not a fan of powder highlighters because it looks a bit fake to me,” says Violette. “Creamy balm textures will give you a dewiness as if you’re not wearing any products.

Blot, then set

First, soak up excess oil with blotting papers. Then, look to a featherweight translucent powder to seal in foundation and prevent unwanted sheen. “Use a brush to apply it very lightly and only to the areas that get the most shiny,” says Nasrat, adding that the leftover lustre is what will really drive home that second-skin guise. Silky smooth and even-toned, with just the right amount of lit-from-within dewiness, that’s how you execute believably perfect skin.

VOGUE

5 Beauty Pros Share Their Go-To Products—And Why Makeup Should Be For All

If you’re a beauty junkie, you know that navigating the world of makeup can be a pretty overwhelming experience. Whether you’re in the market for a new concealer, translucent powder, or setting spray, there seems to be a million options for each—who has time to test them all and find the very best one? Luckily, that’s what beauty pros are for.

Vogue reached out to five noteworthy influencers and makeup artists who are all gaining large followings for their stellar makeup looks.  This includes Neon MUA and Robert Welsh—both of whom create colorful eyeshadow looks like no other—and Wayne Goss, who has nearly 4 million followers on YouTube. If you’re a Lil Nas X fan, you may also recognize Anthony H. Nguyen’s work: He serves as the rapper’s makeup artist, and has created many of his memorable red carpet and video looks (like this graphic liner for the “Montero” video). Meanwhile, Shantanu Dhope—whose Instagram tagline is “Brown Boys wear makeup too”—also creates eye-catching beauty looks that incorporate his Desi culture.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #64 series on my blog.

Beyond simply creating enchanting looks, these pros are also proving makeup is truly for all—whether female, male, or nonbinary. Dhope, for instance, says he proudly wears makeup because, “I feel we do not have enough brown skin representation in the beauty industry, especially brown men wearing makeup. In India, a boy wearing makeup is still a very new concept, and a lot of people consider it to be a taboo.” Goss also specifically encourages men who are new to makeup to experiment and have fun with it. “When it comes to makeup, most men tend to want to enhance their looks without anyone knowing they’re wearing any,” says Goss. His tip to achieving the perfect beginner look? “Make sure you apply ‘little’ and avoid over-application. Less is more. And never be afraid of blush—healthy skin has some color to it.”

Below, read on for these five beauty artists’s top products for everyone to try.

Neon MUA

Call me biased, but my collection of face palettes with Midas Cosmetics is something that everyone needs in their kit. These palettes are pigmented, buttery, and most importantly, they have the range. My focus with creating this collection was to make sure that everyone can have access to effective contours and bronzers, whether you are fair and need products that don’t run orange, or if you’re deeply rich and are tired of not having access to contours and bronzers that actually show up on your complexion.

Buy on their website $42

Urban Decay All Nighter Waterproof Setting Powder

This is a recent must-have for me. I love this powder because it is truly translucent. The All Nighter collection is known for being waterproof and locking in your makeup for hours, so being able to finally have a product that helps with sweat and shine that is also a true translucent powder is a gift from the makeup gods.

Buy at Sephora $34

NARS Natural Radiant Longwear Foundation

I will always love NARS foundations because they have such a wide range of shades and undertones, plus their formula is always top-tier. Out of all of the NARS foundations, this is the one that I always find myself reaching for, because it offers a nice amount of coverage without looking cakey, while also giving you the natural, healthy glow that everyone wants.

Buy at Sephora $49

Lunar Beauty Strawberry Dream Palette

MannyMUA in my honest opinion has one of the most impressive influencer brands in beauty, because he’s not afraid to play with color and concepts. All of his palettes are truly impressive (especially his revamped Life’s A Drag Facelift palette), but if there’s one palette that I will also grab, it’s the Strawberry Dream palette. Reds and blues are some of the hardest colors to work with in terms of shadows, yet these shades are so pigmented and blend like a dream. Everyone needs this palette.

Buy on their website $48

Robert Welsh

Glossier Brow Flick

With the classic technique of soap brows becoming a more recent trend, and many brands releasing their version of brow grooming waxes, this is one of the only brow products I have found that draws smoothly and precisely over a waxy texture. After grooming brows into that fluffy look, this pen is also perfect to draw strokes of hair on the brows, without losing the overall look.

Buy on their website $22

Lisa Eldridge Elevated Glow Highlighter

I find a lot of highlighters can look textured or obvious on the skin—either because they contain glitter, or because the shades are slightly off, with a metallic finish. This highlighter is the complete opposite. There are multiple different shades that complement skin tone, instead of the highlighter being just pink or gold for example. When applying this highlighter, you notice how it effortlessly blends, and almost becomes one with your skin. And because it’s buildable, you can start at a natural “glowing from within” to a more dramatic glow.

Buy on their website $27

By BeautyBay Eyeshadows

Beauty Bay has always been a go-to destination for me when looking to try new products and brands, as they offer everything from drugstore to high-end products. Their own brand’s eyeshadows, at drugstore prices, offer high-end quality. Every texture, matte, shimmer, and glitter are extremely pigmented and blend beautifully. They all have an almost creamy texture that is easy to build, and are a pleasure to use when creating a makeup look. 

Buy on their website $24

Patrick Ta Major Sculpt Crème Contour & Powder Bronzer Duo

One thing I get asked a lot is “what’s the difference between bronzer and contour?” These compacts are the perfect representation of what a bronzer and contour should be. The bronzing powder provides just the right amount of “sun-kissed” without being orange, and the cream contour shades create the perfect ‘bone structure-mimicking’ contour colour, which blends naturally into the skin. If you’ve had trouble finding your perfect contour shade before, or perhaps are intimidated by the idea of contouring, this product is the perfect place to start, and stick with.

Buy at Sephora $38

Shantanu Dhope

Fenty Beauty Pro Filt’r Concealer

I love this product a lot because it gives me an amazing amount of coverage with very little product. It is great for making my under eye area look bright and awake with a flawless finish. 

Buy at Sephora $26

Laura Mercier Translucent Loose Setting Powder

This has been my go-to setting powder for the longest time because it sets my concealer in place without creasing and mattifies the oily areas of my face without feeling heavy. 

Buy at ULTA $39

Morphe Continuous Setting Mist

This mist just refreshes my makeup and makes my skin look and feel hydrated throughout the day. Its like an instant touch up to make my skin dewy. 

Buy at ULTA $16

Anastasia Beverly Hills Dip Brow Gel

I cannot leave my house without grooming my eyebrows. I just run this product quickly through my brows to give me a clean and fresh looking brow. It gives me the right amount of color without looking over done. 

Buy at Sephora $20

Anthony H. Nguyen

KVD Beauty Tattoo Liner

This is the most jet-black, fine-tip liquid liner I go to when I need something to stay put without smudging or creasing!

Buy at Sephora $21

KVD Beauty Lock It Setting Spray

This setting spray is hands down the best insurance for securing all-day wear for your makeup. Helps with less touch ups!

Buy at ULTA $29

Blot Film

It can be anything from Clean & Clear to the Target dupe. I love taking away oil and shine without having to add more product on top when not needed.

Buy on Amazon $11

Ardell Individual Lashes

You can always count on individual lashes to create the most natural lash effect without weighing down your eye, plus it’s super comfortable.

Buy at ULTA $6

Wayne Goss

Wayne Goss Radiance Boosting Bronzer 

Bronzer adds a healthy glow to the skin that isn’t obvious or adds texture.

Buy at Beautylish $61

Wayne Goss Weightless Veil Blush

While I know this often feels like a feminine product, adding “red” or a “flushed” look to the skin gives everyone that instant healthy been-outside look.

Buy on Beautylish $61

Nars Radiant Creamy Concealer 

Use concealer with caution. If using to cover a pimple, it must match exactly, otherwise you’re highlighting it! Used under the eyes, stay within the darkness only—it should be invisible.

Buy at Sephora $30

RCMA No Color Powder 

I like both loose or pressed. Keeps shine at bay all day long. 

Buy at Beautylish $19

VOGUE ARTICLE