What Is Dermaplaning and Should You Try It?

If you’ve seen beauty enthusiasts on social media carefully gliding small razors across their faces, you may have wondered what the heck dermaplaning is, what it can do for your face, and whether it’s actually safe to try at home.

Yes, the skin-care trend might look like an easy DIY treatment for exfoliating skin or getting rid of peach fuzz, but many experts say you should avoid trying this one at home in most cases. Plus, dermaplaning is not recommended for all skin types or for people with certain skin conditions.

Below, dermatologists explain what you should know about dermaplaning, including the risks, the benefits, how often you should dermaplane, and how much the treatment can cost (which may affect how often you can have dermaplaning done).

What is dermaplaning, exactly?

Facial dermaplaning is a cosmetic procedure that involves gently scraping your face with a scalpel to remove the epidermis—your top layer of skin—and small hairs, Jenny Kim, MD, PhD, professor of dermatology, medicine, and nutrition at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, tells SELF. Traditionally, people have the procedure done in a dermatologist’s office; however, you can find blades at the drugstore marketed for at-home use, like this Schick Hydro Silk tool ($6, Amazon), or you can splurge on a sonic device like Dermaflash Luxe+ ($200, Dermaflash) for an at-home experience closer to the dermatologist’s office. That said, it’s safer for a professional to perform the treatment in most cases. (More on this below.)

During a dermaplaning session performed by an expert, a dermatologist (or licensed esthetician in practice with a dermatologist) uses a medical-grade scalpel to scrape across the surface of the skin. The treatment typically takes about 15 to 30 minutes, and the dermaplaning cost can be anywhere from $40 to more than $150, depending on where you live and where you go (it will be more expensive to get a treatment from a board-certified dermatologist because they have more training).

Is dermaplaning the same as shaving?

Not exactly. Facial dermaplaning does involve shaving off layers of skin—primarily just that upper epidermis, the very top layer, Desmond Shipp, MD, a board-certified dermatologist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, tells SELF. That exfoliating effect is why dermaplaning is often done in combination with facials (in what’s known as a “dermaplaning facial”), he adds.

With an in-office dermaplaning procedure, dermatologists typically use a no. 10 scalpel blade or an electric-razor-like device called a dermatome, according to Dr. Shipp, whereas shaving entails a straight razor blade or a three- to five-blade razor. Another key distinction: Shaving is meant for hair removal, not exfoliation—it only cuts hair at the skin level, and should not remove any layers of skin.

One more difference with dermaplaning is that the scalpel or dermatome also allows for a smoother, closer removal of those tiny, fine facial hairs known as peach fuzz, since the blades aren’t guarded like a body-hair razor is.

What are the benefits of dermaplaning?

It can remove peach fuzz.

The main reason people do it is to remove the vellus hairs on their faces, which, again, some people refer to as peach fuzz. Everyone has these fine vellus hairs coating their bodies, and they serve a purpose: Vellus hairs keep us warm and add another layer of protection to the skin. But some people’s vellus hairs are thicker and/or darker (so more visible) than others, and depending on how they feel about that, they might want to have them removed. Removing peach fuzz with dermaplaning also “allows makeup to go on much smoother, and can make skin look and feel more rejuvenated,” Dr. Shipp says. (In other words, your baby-smooth face will likely glow.)

Of course, dermaplaning is just one way to do that. There are many at-home hair removal kits that may get the job done. However, board-certified dermatologist Rosemarie Ingleton, MD, tells SELF that typical hair-removal methods like waxing and threading don’t always provide the results people are looking for (especially in terms of exfoliating and removing finer hairs), which makes dermaplaning an appealing option.

You may have heard that shaving hair on your face makes hair grow back thicker—that’s technically not true. But it may look thicker or darker, since shaving can cause hairs to have a blunter tip as they grow out, according to the Mayo Clinic. However, Dr. Shipp asserts that the hair doesn’t typically grow back thicker or darker following an in-office dermaplaning session that was done with a precise scalpel.

People might also try laser hair removal for longer-lasting results, Jeanine Downie, MD, a board-certified dermatologist based in New Jersey, tells SELF. But note that your hair can still grow back with this method, it takes several sessions to see changes, the cost per session ranges from $300 to $400, and people with darker skin are generally more prone to hyperpigmentation (dark spots) and burning after laser hair removal compared to people with lighter skin.

And it can also help exfoliate your skin.

While the biggest reason Dr. Ingelton does dermaplaning at her office is to remove vellus hairs, she says that the blade also gets rid of a superficial layer of dead skin called the stratum corneum. This can make your skin look brighter, help your skin-care products sink in better, and help your foundation go on smoother. In Dr. Ingleton’s practice, dermaplaning is often an add-on done before other treatments like microdermabrasion or lasers like Fraxel in order to get a jump-start and exfoliate the top layer of dead skin cells before these exfoliating procedures.

When it comes to exfoliating, there are no studies showing how dermaplaning compares to other treatments like retinoids or chemical peels, says Dr. Kim. That’s one reason why Dr. Downie prefers to use peels over dermaplaning—even for sensitive skin—and doesn’t offer dermaplaning in her practice. “Peels help to improve texture, tone, acne, and fine lines,” she says. “They are not equivalent at all, and many peels give deeper exfoliation than a scalpel.”

What are the cons of dermaplaning?

While it might feel like getting rid of these hairs is easy to do at home with an inexpensive blade, most professionals warn against it if you have the option of seeing a dermatologist for the treatment. Any blade you get over-the-counter won’t be as sharp—or as effective—as the medical-grade scalpel used at a doctor’s office. And there’s always a chance that you’ll cut yourself in the process of dermaplaning your own skin (since you’re not trained to perform the procedure), potentially causing scarring.

Anytime a sharp object goes near your face, there is a risk of damage to the skin. “The main risk is cutting the skin, which can lead to infection, scarring, and dyspigmentation,” Anthony Rossi, MD, a board-certified dermatologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, tells SELF. It’s easy for skin to get infected from bacteria if you don’t properly clean it (or if the tool you’re using isn’t clean) beforehand—and if there’s an active infection in one area of your skin, you can end up spreading that to other areas of your face as you dermaplane, adds Dr. Rossi.

Dr. Downie also says that she’s seen people with scarring after a session of dermaplaning gone wrong. Although some medical spas offer dermaplaning, she recommends seeing a professional board-certified dermatologist for this kind of procedure. Board certification is an extra step that shows a physician completed advanced training in their specialty. (You can find a board-certified specialist by visiting the American Academy of Dermatology website.)

Dermatologists can assess the full picture of your skin’s health and make sure dermaplaning is right for you, says Dr. Rossi. Also, dermatologists may be in partnership with trained aestheticians who offer dermaplaning, and if you’re going to see an aesthetician for this treatment, it’s best to see someone who’s in practice with a dermatologist.

How often should you do a dermaplaning session?

In order to keep the hair away, you might have to get treated about once a month. (Of course, the exact timeline will look different for each person.) Dr. Kim says this is not a treatment you should do too frequently. Your epidermis helps protect you from allergens and other potential irritants in the outside world—dermaplaning too often may irritate or damage that top layer of protection, she says. Again, this is why it’s best to consult with a physician who can help you decide on the appropriate frequency for your skin and needs.

How to take care of your skin before and after a dermaplaning session

For the best exfoliation results, it’s smart to prep your skin by steaming your face—either as part of your in-office treatment or with an at-home steaming method, like hopping in a hot shower—before a dermaplaning session. “The heat will loosen dirt and sebum and help to remove the dead skin cells easier. It also makes the skin more pliable, softer, and the vellus hairs easier to remove,” says Dr. Rossi.

Rehydrating your skin post-dermaplaning is just as important in order to protect the epidermal barrier you’re exfoliating, Dr. Rossi adds. Since you’re removing that layer of dead skin cells and stripping the skin of that outer protective barrier, you’ll want to wash your skin with a gentle cleanser and then apply a rich moisturizer (think hydrating, skin barrier-protecting ingredients like hyaluronic acid and strengthening ceramides).

You’ll want to keep up the moisturizing for a couple of weeks too. Since the skin cells in the epidermis take about 14 days to turn over (or up to 40 to 50 days as you age) and create a new outer layer of skin, it’s important to moisturize your face to replenish the barrier of the skin that was just removed, Dr. Rossi explains.

After a dermaplaning treatment, you should also stay out of the sun as much as possible until your skin barrier restores and you stop seeing redness, tenderness, or swelling. “You have to coat your skin with sunscreen afterward because you’re going to be more sensitive to the sun,” says Dr. Downie. The exfoliation exposes a new layer of skin that isn’t typically exposed to sunlight, so it can more easily cause U.V. damage. “You also have to be cautious of retinol and glycolic acids,” adds Dr. Downie, for that same reason.

Dermatologists recommend that people with sensitive skin use a light moisturizer like Vanicream ($36, Amazon) because it doesn’t contain fragrances or other irritants, which may inflame your already-sensitive skin.

When should you avoid dermaplaning?

There are a few instances where you should think twice before signing up for a dermaplaning facial or other dermaplaning treatment. For one, you’ll want to avoid dermaplaning if you’re experiencing an active acne, rosacea, psoriasis, or eczema flare-up, since the treatment could cause further irritation and excessive skin peeling, says Dr. Rossi. There’s also a chance that the blade could nick a pimple, adds Dr. Downie, which means it would take longer to heal. 

Also, tell your dermatologist if you have a history of cold sores. “If you have a breakout of cold sores, you need to be on an anti-viral medication like Valtrex, and the physician needs to avoid the area,” says Dr. Downie. Without the use of a preventive oral anti-herpes medication, the cold sores can spread due to microtears in the skin.

The bottom line: Consulting with a dermatologist will help ensure the safest possible dermaplaning experience—and the best, most glowing results.

SELF

How To Incorporate Glycolic Acid Into Your Skincare Regime, According To Dermatologists

Famed for its ability to brighten and refine skin texture and tone – as well as reduce the appearance of lines and wrinkles, breakouts and blemishes – glycolic acid is a routine essential, and with good reason. That said, as an active ingredient, a little bit of homework before you introduce it into your regime is a must. Here’s what you need to know.

What is glycolic acid?

Glycolic acid is a chemical exfoliant that belongs to a family of acids known as alpha hydroxy acids, or AHAs – a term you’ve probably heard being bandied about in skincare circles. Widely used and derived from sugar cane, other AHAs include lactic, citric and mandelic acids.

What is glycolic acid used for?

Glycolic acid works as an exfoliator by loosening the glue that holds dead cells to the skin’s outer surface, the stratum corneum, helping to reveal the younger, fresher cells underneath. “Exfoliation should be a regular part of your skincare routine,” advises consultant dermatologist Dr Anjali Mahto. “It gives an instant improvement to the appearance of skin by removing the dull, dry layer of upper skin cells. Superficial exfoliation will not only make the texture of the skin look better, but will also improve age spots and uneven skin tone, as well as allowing better penetration of your serum or moisturiser.” Possessing the smallest size molecules of all the AHAs means that glycolic acid is easily able to penetrate into the skin, so it’s a hugely effective way to improve cellular turnover. Thanks to its ability to penetrate the dermis – the layer of skin beneath the epidermis where collagen is secreted by fibroblast cells – it helps promote collagen synthesis too.

Is glycolic acid suitable for all skin types?

Glycolic acid is effective when used on normal, combination and oily skin, but sensitive skins should be wary of diving straight in, as it can cause irritation. Just as you’d use retinol sparingly to start with, exercise caution when it comes to trying glycolic for the first time. “Start with a low concentration once per week and gradually build up frequency, then build up concentration slowly depending on skin needs and tolerability,” advises consultant dermatologist Dr Zainab Laftah at HCA The Shard

Seasonality can also impact how well it’s tolerated. “As [glycolic acid] is effectively stripping away the upper layers of skin cells it can make your skin more sensitive to sunshine; using sunscreen is therefore essential,” warns Dr Mahto. Happily, for those trying to navigate the confusing world of pregnancy-safe skincare, glycolic acid (in low concentrations) is on the accepted list of ingredients to use – particularly welcome news if you’re experiencing hormonal dullness or breakouts. If you do find yourself unable to tolerate it, all is not lost: “Lactic acid is a mild gentle chemical exfoliant and a good alternative for those who are unable to tolerate glycolic acid, or have a history of sensitive or dry skin types,” notes Dr Laftah.

What’s the best form of glycolic acid to use?

If you’re new to this AHA, an easy way to incorporate it into your routine is through a cleanser, which won’t come into contact with skin for too long and is quickly washed off. It’s also a good litmus test for sensitivity as glycolic acid is immediately neutralised on contact with water. Once you’ve acclimatised you can move on to leave-on formulations including toners, serums and moisturisers, where concentration will be a little higher. “The ideal concentration used at home is between 8 to 15%,” advises Dr Laftah. 

While products like cleansers and toners that contain small amounts can be used daily, most people find once or twice week is sufficient when using anything stronger. Higher concentrations of glycolic acid will naturally yield more intensive results and offer an instant skin glow, but these should only be used by professionals. “Glycolic acid can also be used as a medical-grade chemical peel, only available in clinic, in higher concentrations of 30-70%,” adds Dr Mahto. “It should ideally be started at low concentrations and built up to avoid skin irritation, particularly in pigmented skin.” As well as the concentration, pay attention to the pH of your chosen product; those formulated with a higher pH are done so in order to weaken the acid’s strength, and therefore minimise potential irritation to the skin. If the pH of your product sits between three and four then it is guaranteed that the strength of glycolic is as it is stated on the bottle.

Are there any ingredients you should avoid while using glycolic acid?

Although it can be used seamlessly with other AHAs and BHAs, including pore-refining salicylic acid, there are some standout skincare ingredients that should be avoided while you use glycolic. “Due to the increased risk of skin dryness and inflammation glycolic acid and retinoids should not be used simultaneously,” warns Dr Laftah. If you’re desperate to reap the skin-boosting benefits of both, start using one and work up to tolerance gradually. Once you’ve established that, introduce the other slowly and only use them on alternate days. The two used together at the same time is a recipe for serious irritation, no matter how robust you think your skin is.

Can glycolic acid harm the skin?

Although it’s a gentle exfoliant, as with anything active, overuse can cause damage, particularly to the skin barrier, the skin’s first line of defence against harmful pollutants and pathogens. In the winter months particularly, the skin barrier is often compromised by colder temperatures and fluctuating central heating anyway, so caution against being too overzealous with your glycolic, especially if trying it for the first time. If you have overdone it, you’re likely to experience dryness, flakiness, redness and irritation. “The good news is [that] this is reversible,” says Dr Laftah. “By stopping the chemical exfoliant, hydrating the skin and treating any active inflammation, the skin barrier can be restored.

The best glycolic acid products to try

VOGUE

Medical Skincare Brands Are Trending; These Are The Best Ones

How to choose a skincare product? For most of us, it begins with trust. Do we believe in the efficacy of the skincare products (and brands) we’re thinking of investing our hard-earned money in? This goes some way towards explaining why doctor-founded skincare brands are having a moment. Given we’ve spent the majority of a year estranged from our facialists and dermatologists, it’s hardly surprising that we’ve sought the same kind of professional expertise and results from our skincare routines.

Online e-tailers like Space NK have continued to see growth in the entire skincare category over the last few months, with high-tech skincare, like doctor brands, leading the way. “We saw customers looking for more high tech solutions when clinics closed,” Suze College, head buyer at Space NK, tells British Vogue. “Investment in at-home tools is one area which continues to trend with our customers, with products like Dr Dennis Gross’s Spectralite Facewear Pro for at-home LED being a popular choice.” Searches for Dr Dennis Gross and Dr Sebagh are up 96 per cent and 60 per cent respectively on the site, while Augustinus Bader is up a huge 1,060 per cent.

Dr Barbara Sturm, whose skincare range is beloved by celebrities and beauty editors alike, says there is a strong argument for putting your money into a doctor-led brand. “Healthy skin and good skincare is all about science,” she says. “It therefore makes sense to buy skincare from a doctor, as the products are [reliably] focused on efficacy and ingredient science.” She started her own brand to cater to her patients’ post-treatment skincare needs, and to ensure they were following an effective regime to enhance in-clinic results. 

Of course, they aren’t all made equal. “Doctor-led brands aren’t automatically infused with magic,” she says. “The only thing that sustains a brand is proven results.” With that in mind, British Vogue takes a closer look at 10 of the best doctor-led skincare brands that guarantee good skin results.

Dr Barbara Sturm

With an onus on combatting inflammation in the skin, Dr Sturm’s skincare line is built to heal and foster good skin health. What to pick from the line? The new The Good C Vitamin C Serum comes Hailey Bieber-approved, and you can’t go wrong with the Hyaluronic Acid Serum, either.

Augustinus Bader

Harnessing the power of a patented molecule called TFC8 (or Trigger Factor Complex), and Professor Augustinus Bader’s (world-leading) expertise in stem cell research, this is a high-tech skincare line if ever we saw one. The formulas, which essentially prompt skin cells to work hard in repair and restore mode, are fast becoming cult. Try The Cream (or its Rich counterpart), to see what all the fuss is about.

Lancer

Dr Harold Lancer is a Los Angeles-based dermatologist whose clientele is suitably starry – from Victoria Beckham to Jennifer Lopez, he is responsible for many a luminous visage. His eponymous skincare line includes The Method, a three-step system comprising the Cleanser, Polish, and Nourish, a moisturiser, to help encourage cell renewal for the smoothest skin going.

Dr Dennis Gross

If it’s smooth, glowing skin you’re after, there is a Dr Dennis Gross skincare product to help you make it happen. Opt for the Ferulic + Retinol range if you’re concerned about fine lines or lacklustre skin; the Hyaluronic range for deep hydration; and the C+ Collagen range for brightening. Oh, and you’d be silly not to try the Alpha Beta Universal Peel Pads, which he has rightly become famous for.

111 Skin

Founded by Harley Street cosmetic surgeon, Dr Yannis Alexandrides, 111 Skin was originally launched to offer his patients the right formulas to help their skin heal after treatments. Now it’s a line – loved by everyone from Margot Robbie to Priyanka Chopra – that offers unbeatable sheet masks (we love the Sub-Zero Depuffing Face Masks), as well as the latest Y Theorem Concentrate, a seven-day treatment programme designed to repair the skin barrier and alleviate stress.

MZ Skin

Ocuplastic surgeon and aesthetic doctor, Dr Maryam Zamani’s, skincare line is as chic as they come – check out that blush and gold packaging. It’s also highly effective, and caters to every skin concern, from pigmentation to dullness and dehydration. The emphasis is on a glow – something Dr Zamani herself always emanates – try the Rest & Revive serum for the ultimate overnight treatment, and expect your skin to be radiant by the time your alarm goes off.

Dr Sebagh

The rich and famous love the discreet Dr Sebagh for his injectable tweakments – and his skincare line is also as youth-giving. The whole line is high-performance and filled with active ingredients. Standouts include the Deep Exfoliating Mask, which contains lactic and azelaic acid for fresh, even-toned skin, and the Supreme Maintenance Serum for overall good skin health.

SkinCeuticals

Founded by dermatologist, professor and skincare chemist Dr Sheldon Pinnell in 1997, SkinCeuticals is a staple in many efficacious skincare routines thanks to its medical approach to high-end skincare. Its topical antioxidants, whether CE Ferulic or the newest launch, Silymarin CF, become instant essentials for anyone who tries them. 

VOGUE

The 7 Questions Dermatologists Get Asked All The Time – And Their Answers

From acne and rosacea to simply not knowing where to start with a good skincare routine, we turn to dermatologists for all manner of skincare concerns. Given that they have seen, done and experienced it all when it comes to the skin, what are the questions they get asked most often? And what advice do they give? British Vogue sat down with three experts to find out.

Does your diet affect acne?

For the vast majority of people, acne purely comes down to your hormones and genetics,” says Dr Anjali Mahto. “That said, there is a small, select group of people that may be sensitive to dairy and refined sugars. I don’t recommend people cut things out of their diet at random because I think that can lead to issues around food restriction and disordered eating. But if you are noticing that your skin is breaking out when you eat dairy – and I’m not talking about a splash in your coffee, but huge amounts or taking whey protein supplements – there is probably some benefit in switching to a plant-based alternative that’s got a low GI index. Think unsweetened soy milk or almond milk, which are both better than oat milk.” Dr Justine Kluk agrees, stating that dietary changes alone are not enough to control acne. “They can form part of the management approach alongside prescription treatment, but don’t replace it in most cases,” she says.

Is the SPF in moisturiser equivalent to the one in sunscreen?

The SPF in your moisturiser is tested the same way as an SPF in sunscreen, so an SPF 30 moisturiser should provide an SPF of 30,” explains Dr Justine Kluk. “The main issue is that these formulas are less likely to be rub and water resistant and may be applied a lot more thinly than sunscreen. It’s for this reason that they may not offer the same level of protection. It is also worth noting that moisturisers containing an SPF may not contain any UVA protection and, as a result, will not protect against UV ageing.”

Do collagen supplements actually work?

If you look at the majority of data, at this moment in time, there isn’t any really good evidence that collagen supplements actually work,” says Dr Mahto. “That’s essentially because collagen is a protein – just like eating a piece of steak or tofu is protein. All that will happen is your gut breaks it down into constituent amino acids and doesn’t think, ‘I need to send it to the skin’, so it gets passed around the body. Also, if you’ve got enough expendable cash to be buying collagen supplements – they’re not cheap – you’re probably also the kind of person who is wearing sunscreen and following a good, healthy diet and using a retinol, so it becomes tricky to figure out whether it’s the collagen supplement working or the other things. I’m sceptical, but if you can show me good data that works, I’m willing to change my position on it.

Will my breakouts ever go away?

They might, but the reality for many women is that they often continue into the thirties and beyond,” says Dr Sam Bunting. “The good news is that the right anti-acne skincare routine will often be a highly effective plan for tackling premature ageing too, so your skin may well look better and better as time goes on.

What is the right age to start having injectables?

Lots of people ask if they’re too young or too old for injectables,” says Dr Mahto. “Generally, people that are in their mid-thirties onwards have figured out whether it’s a reasonable time to get started. Usually what I say in this scenario, is that it’s not actually about your age, it’s more about how your skin is ageing. That depends on your individual genetics – how your parents age – as well as how much sun exposure you’ve had, your diet, how stressed out you are and how you sleep. You can have somebody in their late twenties who’s had very little sun and their skin is ageing beautifully and they don’t need any injectable treatments. On the other hand, you could have a 28-year-old who has a really expressive face, they’ve enjoyed sunny holidays and outdoor sport, and they’re starting to get lines when their forehead is at rest or noticing a loss of volume in fat in their face. For someone like that, it might be a reasonable time to start. Different ethnic groups also age differently – somebody who has really fair skin, blonde hair and blue eyes will start to get wrinkles more quickly than somebody who has Asian or Black skin, because their melanin will protect them. The flip-side is that those with Asian and Black skin tend to start losing volume in their faces more quickly, so they tend to need filler before they need Botox.”

Is my skincare routine working?

I think there is still a basic lack of understanding around what you actually need in a skincare routine and what you don’t,” Dr Mahto says. “People buy into the buzz about the latest ingredients – whether that’s niacinamide or tranexamic acid – but actually the average person does not need to be using every single one of those ingredients. What you’re trying to do is use as little as possible on your skin, and to look for ingredients that target multiple things. Vitamin A is anti-ageing, good for acne and pigmentation – so why use niacinamide and tranexamic acid and retinol when you’ve got one ingredient that will do a really good job of that? I spend a lot of time stripping back people’s routines, rather than adding things in.” 

Will anyone be able to tell if I’ve had Botox?

Not if it’s done well,” points out Dr Bunting. “I talk to patients about softening strong expression lines and releasing the tension from the face nowadays – it’s a far cry from the frozen faces of the ’90s. Microdosing means no one else ever has to know.”

VOGUE

The 5 Key Dos And Don’ts Of Wearing SPF

While wearing sunscreen is an essential all year round, it is now – as the days get lighter and brighter and we spend more time outside – that many of us begin to rethink what we’re using on our skin, SPF included. When it comes to sun protection, there is often confusion over things like the best formula to use, or how much you should be applying. British Vogue asked dermatologist Dr Sam Bunting for the five key dos and don’ts of SPF – so you can absorb that much-needed vitamin D with confidence. 

Do: Choose a broad spectrum SPF

To protect skin against both UVA and UVB light – both of which cause damage to the skin – broad spectrum SPF is a must. “What’s really crucial when we’re talking about a good skincare routine is blocking the daily UVA rays which are present all year round,” explains Dr Bunting. “They can come through glass and actually form the bulk (95 per cent) of UV light that reaches the earth.”

While UVB is the UV light responsible for the (more visible) burn – and tends to be the one we focus on more because the damage is seen quickly – it’s really important to ensure your SPF protects against UVA too. UVA damage leads to fine lines, pigmentation, uneven skin texture, big pores, coarsening of the skin and loss of collagen – all the bad stuff. “Beach holidays aren’t so much the problem. It’s the everyday, half an hour out walking at lunchtime that builds up over the years.” A broad spectrum SPF offers a significant level of protection against both UVA and UVB rays, and should be worn by all skin tones.

Do: Pick the right type of sunscreen for your skin

Sunscreens fall into two categories: chemical, which are formulas that contain ingredients like octinoxate and oxybenzone that act as sun filters, absorbing UV light to prevent skin damage; and physical, which are mineral-based and commonly contain zinc oxide and titanium dioxide to physically protect the skin and reflect light away, as well as absorbing it.

The best protection you can get? Dr Bunting says a hybrid of both physical and chemical gives “very good broad spectrum cover from both UVA and UVB rays”, but unfortunately some skin types react to chemical formulations, which are often the preferred formulas because they don’t impart the dreaded white cast over skin. (It’s worth noting that physical ones now do this less, as there has been huge innovation in this sector.)

If you are sensitive or prone to redness, have rosacea or any kind of facial eczema, generally a mineral sunscreen (which is in my Gossamer sunscreen), will offer a more gentle experience,” she says. “That’s also the type we tend to use after procedures like lasers or peels, or whenever the skin barrier is affected. You can get good UVA and UVB protection from both.”

Don’t: Scrimp on how much you apply

We’ve become so pedantic about spelling out how high the SPF is, but it’s rare that brands express how important it is to apply the formula generously to the skin,” says Dr Bunting. “The word ‘liberally’ means 10 different things to 10 different people.” To ensure you’re putting enough of the good stuff on your skin, she advises a quarter of a teaspoon (or 1.25ml) as a good measure for both face and neck. You “need to paint your face like you’re painting a wall”, she says, emphasising the importance of an even coating to get the protection you need. 

A foolproof method is her “13 dot technique” which is as simple as it sounds, and involves applying 13 different dots of SPF around the face and rubbing them in together: “It allows you to divide the SPF evenly without missing bits. If you start these simple rituals now, you will age beautifully into your 40s and beyond. I am evangelical about it.

Don’t: Rely on your make-up for SPF protection

It is a very common misconception that the SPF in your daily foundation will suffice. Dr Bunting says it is likely it won’t. “You need to use a dedicated sunscreen. SPF15 in your tinted moisturiser probably isn’t going to cut it, because that really only means it will give you a little bit of UVB protection.” Add to that the fact it is unlikely you’ll apply enough tinted moisturiser to every area of your skin to offer protection, and the importance of a dedicated SPF becomes even more clear.

Don’t: Wear a low SPF

The age old question: SPF 30 or 50? “I am profoundly for SPF50. UV light is a known entity that not only causes premature ageing but also cancer, and they are both proven without a shadow of a doubt. Both of those things are highly preventable,” Dr Bunting says. Not only does SPF50 offer 95 per cent protection from UV as opposed to SPF30’s 93 per cent (a two per cent difference which, over time, stacks up), Dr Bunting also points out that we are not perfect – meaning many of us under-apply our SPF. “I’d much rather people were under-applying an SPF50 than a 30.”

READ ON FOR 20 Of The Best Face SPFs For Every Skin Type

VOGUE

Fashion’s Favorite Facialist Launches Her Debut Skin-Care Line

Thirteen years ago, Joanna Czech left her celebrity-favorite spa in Manhattan’s Washington Heights neighborhood before moving to Dallas for love. When she decided to return to New York, in 2019, she initially thought the 400-square-foot penthouse space at The Webster would suffice. “If people even remember me,” she thought at the time, “one room will be enough.” It wasn’t. The current wait for an appointment with the Polish-born super-facialist is six months.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #77 series on my blog.

To be fair, Czech never really stopped coming to the city, even once she opened her eponymous flagship studio in Texas. “I would ship my machines from Dallas every month,” recalls the petite blonde, who follows her devices. In New York, she would see regulars including model Amber Valletta and Oscar de La Renta designer Laura Kim; in Los Angeles, she would make house calls chez Kardashian. Czech estimates that she flew 30,000 miles in the month leading up to the pandemic alone. So when lockdown forced her to stand still, giving her time to rethink her business, Czech had a realization: She needed a bigger space—and better products to travel with.

My clients travel nonstop. It’s ‘We are going to Colorado and then Cabo,’ or ‘We are climbing Everest, then going to India.’ So I was thinking about something that helps between climates, too,” Czech says of her debut product collection, The Kit. The seven-piece range draws from Czech’s experience studying chemistry and arrives in a metallic navy pouch with a seat-belt clasp. (The idea was “Prada nylon,” Czech reveals of the design, “but it ended up being more like a Moncler jacket!”) Facial wipes and a bio-cellulose hydrating mask—in-flight essentials—are joined by a pH-controlling toner; two serums, one to soothe with hyaluronic acid, the other to brighten with stabilized vitamin C; and two moisturizers, a water-based cream and a cocooning balm.

Beginning this month, The Kit will appear in the retail space at Czech’s new 2,300-foot SoHo studio, where she will also curate fashion and lifestyle items while offering her signature treatments against a backdrop of decorative molding and custom millwork. “I hate going to ugly spas,” jokes de la Renta’s Kim, who has collaborated with Czech on custom cashmere socks and blankets, which will be featured along with elevated basics from brands such as James Perse and Phillip Lim. Other highlights include a collagen-and-elastin-boosting LED light bed that Czech calls “a piece of art.

At first I was having nervous breakdowns because no one was traveling,” the 57-year-old says of the precarious timing around both the studio opening and the products’ launch. But the formulas are just as good at home as they are on the go. “Everything she recommends always works. She just knows my skin—she knows everyone’s skin,” says Kim Kardashian, offering an endorsement that will likely add at least a few months to that wait list.

VOGUE

6 Rules For Prepping Your Skin As We Transition Into Autumn

Fashion months are upon us, which means that summer is well and truly over. As a result, your holiday glow has started to fade; your skin is left dry and patchy, dehydrated from long hot summer days, and you may experience an increase in pigmentation – melasma, dark spots, or freckling – from all that sun exposure. And the worst part? We’re moving into autumn, which means a whole new set of problems to worry about.

The first is the drop in temperature. “Cooler temperatures usually bring a drop in humidity,” explains A-List facialist and founder of Skinesis skincare, Sarah Chapman. “This can cause the skin to become dehydrated, which can damage its natural barrier, leading to even more moisture loss and sensitivity, while strong winds can ‘wick’ moisture away from the skin, resulting in sore, chapped complexions.”

On top of this, you have your central heating and your hot baths, which, warns Dr Anjali Mahto, consultant dermatologist at 55 Harley Street, can dry the skin out further. “Skin can feel irritated, dry, or tight and may even be more prone to redness,” she explains.

It’s a lot to take in. The good news? You can avoid all of this with a few preventative measures. Here are the six golden rules for protecting your skin this autumn.

1. Start layering your serums

To add more hydration to the skin, Mahto recommends layering a hyaluronic serum under your regular moisturiser. Chapman’s Skinesis Hydrating Boost combines hyaluronic acid with actives to strengthen the skin’s barrier. It’s also oil-free and featherweight, which makes it perfect for the transitional months. Another great alternative is 111Skin Hyaluronic Acid Aqua Booster, which delivers moisture with its blend of hyaluronic acid and aloe vera.

2. Pay attention to your nighttime routine

To kickstart your skin’s natural night-time repair mode, you may want to invest in some nourishing overnight formulas. Supercharge your skin health with Skinesis Overnight Facial, which contains a blend of anti-inflammatory omegas, protective antioxidants, and vitamin-rich botanical oils. Or heal your skin with Estée Lauder’s Advanced Night Repair Serum, which will leave your skin looking plump and radiant by the morning.

3. Always remember to use SPF

Despite deceptive weather conditions, UVA rays are just as strong in the colder months as they are in summer, and are, therefore, just as likely to cause serious damage. So remember to wear daily sunscreen.

4. Keep up to date with your treatments

As well as your daily and nightly skincare routines, it’s good to carve out some time for regular treatments. “Facial massages boost the supply of oxygen and nutrients to cells and bring vitality to a dull complexion,” explains Chapman.

Mahto also recommends microneedling, peels, and laser therapy, but consider seeing a cosmetic dermatologist first to assess your individual needs and skin concerns.

While you’re at it, now is a great time to book yourself an annual mole check with a dermatologist. “Many people notice new moles and skin lesions after the summer due to wearing less clothing,” says Mahto. “This should be part of preventative health screening.”

5. Maintain a healthy diet

When it comes to protecting your skin against seasonal elements, maintaining a healthy diet is essential. “It may be tempting to reach for comfort food when it’s getting colder,” says Chapman, “but green vegetables and oily fish will support your skin from the inside with vital vitamins and antioxidants.”

You may also want to incorporate some boosters such as the Skinesis Omega+ Booster, which helps the skin to hold onto moisture and maintain its lipid content, and, as Mahto recommends, a vitamin D supplement, which will play a vital role as the days gradually grow shorter and (good) sun exposure becomes rare.

6. Drink plenty of water

While it may sound obvious, to combat the dehydrating effects of central heating, it’s so important to keep hydrated, which means drinking plenty of water throughout the day.

VOGUE article

5 Reasons Jojoba Oil Is The Hydrator Your Skin Needs

When it comes to skincare, there always seems to be a hot new ingredient of the moment. Does anyone remember salmon milt? The latest It ingredient? Humble jojoba oil, harvested from the seeds of a North American bush, is a multi-purpose has withstood the trends and test of time. Rose Ingleton, a New York City-based board-certified dermatologist, frequently recommends jojoba oil to her patients. (The Jamaican-born derm also has her own skincare line, which is spiked with superfruits from her native home). Here are the five reasons she loves it so much:

It’s just like human sebum (and that’s a good thing). 

It may be weird to think that the oil made by pressing jojoba plant seeds is so close to those produced by the human body, but nature is wild! “This means it can actually absorb into the skin rather than sitting on top of it like most oils,” Ingleton says.

Sensitive skin will love it. 

“If your skin is particularly sensitive and irritated by active ingredients, pure jojoba oil is a good option for moisturizing your skin,” she adds. Anybody who suffers from eczema, seborrheic dermatitis, or just plain old finicky skin can benefit from slathering their face and body with the golden oil.

You can truly use it all over. 

Hair, cuticles, even to soothe chapped lips—jojoba can be an all-body experience. Ingleton’s tip for maximum hydration and absorption? “As with any oil, applying it to slightly damp skin and hair is always going to work best.”

No clogged pores, here!

Jojoba oil’s bio-similarity to human sebum means that it’s non-comedogenic. “Acne-prone skin types may also see a benefit because it has some anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties,” Ingleton adds. (Hint: coconut oil is comedogenic, so jojoba oil is better if you’re looking for an oil-based makeup remover.) 

It plays nice with harsher ingredients. 

Retinol? Don’t be scared of it you’re using jojoba oil in your routine. “Because jojoba oil helps with dryness and irritation, it’s a great match for pairing with prescription topicals or with retinol serums,” Ingleton says. She suggests using Retxurizing Retinol Booster Serum from her own line (which has been designated as Clean at Sephora).

ELLE article

6 K-Beauty Pros On How To Achieve Glowing Summer Skin

Whether you’re about to jet off to a green-list tropical island or settle into a staycation, it’s time to make sure your summer skincare routine is at its tip-top shape. From dehydrating heat and pore-blocking humidity to those extra strong and damaging UV rays, sunny climes can have myriad effects on our skin.

So, what can we do to protect it? To find out more, VOGUE asked some of the industry’s leading K-beauty and skincare experts for their tried-and-tested tips.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #58 series on my blog.

1. Sarah Oh, founder of skincare and K-beauty blog, Oh My Gloss

“Heat and humidity make our pores produce more sweat and oil, so skin can feel grimier and dirtier than usual [in the summer]. However, it’s important to keep our skincare routine gentle, even when washing our skin. People tend to over-wash and use harsher face cleansers around this time — these strip the skin, causing dryness and sometimes prompting the skin to produce more oil.”

“Using a low-pH cleanser is a gentle yet effective way to wash away daily impurities while keeping the skin healthy. In K-beauty, cleansing is the most important step, so doing this properly will set your summer routine for success in motion. Technique tip: work on sections of the face for up to a minute, make small rolling motions with your fingertips.”

“My husband and I love using the 107 Chaga Jelly Low pH Cleanser. It washes off clean, doesn’t leave behind a film, and the crushed green tea leaf powder and the aged vinegar in the formulation give your skin a mild exfoliation.”

2. Elisa Lee, founder of K-beauty product website, Dot Dot Skin

“Sunscreen is a must, every single day, even if you stay indoors or you go out for a few minutes. I like Cosrx Aloe Soothing Sun Cream as it doesn’t leave a white cast, it’s not sticky and it looks great under make-up. Reapplying sunscreen throughout the day is also needed. I recommend putting it on your neck and hands too, and using a lip balm with SPF — these are the areas that people forget, but they’re so important. Also, wear caps or hats to protect your face from the sun.”

“During the summer, I love using cooling products — I suggest storing sheet masks and eye patches in the fridge for an extra cooling effect. I love using skincare tools and I put those in the fridge as well, such as Fraîcheur Paris Ice Globes. My favourite tool is the icing roller that I massage over my sheet mask.”

“I also recommend applying lightweight products that are hydrating — try the Keep Cool Soothe Bamboo Toner and the Keep Cool Soothe Bamboo Lotion. Or, you can use face mist/face toners, which keep everything light and refreshing, such as the Pyunkang Yul Mist Toneror Cosrx Centella Water Alcohol-Free Toner. I also love the Benton Aloe Propolis Soothing Gel — it’s cooling, soothing and calming. It works amazingly well on sunburn. If you have acne, I recommend the Dear Klairs Midnight Blue Calming Cream as it cools the skin down while treating breakouts.”

3. Coco Park, founder of review blog The Beauty Wolf and co-author of Korean Beauty Secrets (Skyhorse, 2018)

“My biggest skincare tip for summer is a three-part mantra, but honestly it’s a bit of a no-brainer. Keep it cool, keep it simple and keep it calm! First of all, for me, everything that comes after cleansers lives in the fridge during summer. There’s nothing more refreshing than a chilled sheet mask or a gel eye patch. When my skin is hot, it’s also red and angry, so cooled-down products help soothe it. I’m obsessed with sprays, but since I have dry skin, I want my mists to be more than just water. The Farm Stay It’s Real Collagen Gel Mist is like a moisturizer in a spray, and I love it.”

“Warmer months aren’t the time to use chemical exfoliants. A good philosophy is that summer is for maintenance, winter is for treatments. Sunscreen is always key, but it’s of utmost importance when we’re spending more time outdoors.”

4. Katherine Spowart, founder of K-beauty blog Skinfull of Seoul

“My skin gets a lot of heat, and that’s one of the areas that the aestheticians at Shangpree Spa in Seoul helped me understand how to treat. Ms Joo-Eun Kim, the spa director, explained that when my skin is hot, I should only use my hands to apply skincare as cotton pads and other tools can cause further heat friction. She also made me aware that red, dry skin makes moisture leave much more quickly, so it’s important to rehydrate with toners and cooling sheet masks.”

5. Sarah Lee, co-CEO and co-founder of beauty brand Glow Recipe

“Growing up in Korea, we would always observe our mothers and grandmothers perform their beauty rituals. It was a common practice for them to rub cold watermelon rinds on our backs in the hot summer months. It would instantly soothe and heal our heat rash, so this superfruit became the inspiration behind our first product — the Watermelon Glow Sleeping Mask — and has since become a Glow Recipe signature to achieving natural, glowy skin. Watermelon is rich in water content, vitamins, amino acids and anti-inflammatory minerals, which is why it works as a skin hydrator and soother.”

“This mask is a great calming treatment after a day out in the sun — you can use it as the last step of your bedtime routine as an overnight mask, or as a 10-minute wash-off treatment for instantly soothed and plump skin. As well as watermelon, it has hyaluronic acid and AHAs to gently exfoliate and hydrate the skin, which makes it ideal for all skin types. I love putting it in the fridge at least 30 minutes before application for an extra cooling experience. Our early beauty memories have driven the innovations that we bring to Glow Recipe and they remind us of the efficacy of natural ingredients.”

“Another tip to beat summer skin buildup is treating yourself to a clay-infused facial treatment. Traditionally, clay masks can be too harsh for all skin types, especially sensitive or dry complexions — which is why we recently launched the Watermelon Glow Hyaluronic Clay Pore-Tight Facial. Our hyaluronic-acid-infused whipped clay frees skin of cell buildup and draws out impurities, while chemical exfoliants, watermelon enzymes, BHA and PHA help clear congested pores. Combined with gentle, exfoliating blueberry-seed powder, this five-minute facial encourages softer, brighter, and clearer-looking skin.”

6. Christine Chang, co-CEO and co-founder of beauty brand Glow Recipe

“Watermelon is a soothing and calming ingredient that blends beautifully with a range of active elements. We love formulating products that intend to hydrate, smooth and balance the skin with watermelon extract, leveraging its calming and soothing properties.”

“Three must-have products for healthy skin throughout the summer are the Watermelon Glow PHA + BHA Pore-Tight TonerWatermelon Glow Niacinamide Dew Drops, and Watermelon Glow Pink Juice Moisturizer.”

VOGUE article

Jennifer Garner’s $30 Bouncy Skin Secret Gets Rid Of Wrinkles And Depuffs Skin

Jennifer Garner is full of surprises. I can’t say I was expecting her to be the hilarious Instagram video creator that she is, or for her to team up with Jill Biden to promote vaccinations in West Virginia. One thing slightly more routine? For Garner to be transparent as a window about the specifics of her beauty routine — and while her adoration for Neutrogena skin care is well-known, she says the brand’s most recent addition is making all the difference. 

According to an interview with PEOPLE published in May, the pep in Garner’s step — and skin — is thanks to a recent Neutrogena release focused on firming skin with anti-aging benefits. Speaking to Neutrogena’s new Rapid Firming Peptide Contour Lift Face Cream, Garner says, “It just gives the skin a real youthful vibrancy, and a kind of bounce to it.” 

The Neutrogena moisturizer is part of the brand’s new firming collagen and peptide-centered line, reliant on a dermatologist-developed micropeptide that it claims can deeply penetrate skin to counter depleted collagen and elasticity. For background, peptide products based on enhancing collagen are an ongoing skincare trend; Jennifer Aniston and Kourtney Kardashian advocate for ingesting collagen and tons of Amazon’s best-selling skin products revolve around the ingredient, including serums that have skyrocketed in popularity.   

Shop now: $30; amazon.com

The reason: Our body’s natural collagen production weakens as we age, dermatologist Joshua Zeichner previously told InStyleCollagen is composed of three polypeptide chains, so using them topically can stimulate your skin to pump up its collagen creation and return youthful texture to your face. Since launching last month, the reviews for Garner’s favorite new cream back up the science and its promise of a “visibly lifted, firmer-looking” appearance.

“Beyond making my skin look and feel smoother, healthier, and more rejuvenated, the serum and cream have helped firm and tighten the skin along my cheeks and jawline,” one shopper in their 50s writes. “My cheekbones appear more pronounced, my face looks less puffy, and my skin no longer looks/feels crepey. I enthusiastically recommend these products to others my age who are trying to achieve firmer, younger-looking skin.” 

Another person testifies that the fast-absorbing, lifting cream plumped up their fine lines within a week, bringing a hefty dose of moisture to super dry skin and cinching in their sagging neck. “For that alone, it gets five stars,” the reviewer says. “It also helps with those stupid lines around your mouth, and I swear there’s an improvement with less pronounced marionette lines, so I don’t look like I am super unhappy all of the time.” 

In just under two weeks, the cream fades forehead wrinkles into a shadow of their once-pronounced self, tones down laugh lines and under-eye puffiness, and scraps rough patches altogether. Others say the immediate tightening effect blurs and smooths fine lines from the jump, and within a couple weeks firmed up their jowls without requiring the “guts or the money” needed for more invasive work.  

Garner’s use of the cream and lack of furrowed wrinkles only makes sense — she comes off as a chronically happy person, and while no one’s joyous 24/7, it could be Neutrogena’s innovation that makes it seem that way. Try the drugstore’s newest wonder for $30 and see the changes for yourself.    

INSTYLE article