8 Makeup Artists on How to Make Their Favourite Products Multi-Purpose

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #12 series on my blog.

Daniel Martin

Makeup artist Daniel Martin is a fan of using liquid lipstick not only for the lips, but also as a cheek stain. His favorite product for this hack? Honest Beauty’s Liquid Lipstick in Goddess.

“I love using this liquid lipstick on the face, as well as lips, to add a hint of a continuous flush on the apples of the cheek to bronzed skin,” he shares. “Jessica Alba taught me this trick!”

Kate Lee

Makeup expert Kate Lee swears by using facial oil as a moisturizer, hair treatment, and body scent. Her go-to is Chanel’s Huile de Jasmin Revitalizing Facial Oil.

“During this time of uncertainty, my focus is mainly on the wellness of mind and spirit,” says Lee. “I find that I am more nurturing and minimal in my daily routine and I am taking a break from makeup. I have found that now, more than ever, my olfactory senses really influence my mood. I use Chanel Huile de Jasmin on my face and décolletage daily and using what’s left on my hands, I run it through my hair.”

“The hair holds scent very well and to be gently followed by the scent of Jasmin feels very nurturing,” she continues. “In place of wearing perfume, I’ve been mixing a few drops of Huile de Jasmin into my favorite clean, fragrance-free body lotion by Nécessaire.”

Nikki DeRoest

obbi Brown artist-in-residence Nikki DeRoest likes to apply contour stick to not only add dimesion to cheekbones, but also to the eyes, forehead, and jawline. Her weapon of choice is Westman Atelier’s Face Trace Contour Stick.

“I like to use this stick first in the obvious spot, where it’s intended for use: in the hollows of my cheeks,” she shares. “I start at my ear and swipe inwards, stopping halfway on my cheek. This product is so easy to use and can easily be blended out with fingers or any type of semi-firm brush. While I’m at it, and quickly multi-tasking with my makeup, I also love to swipe a bit just above the crease of my eye on my outer brow bone, on the hollow of my temples and the other edges of my forehead, and of course, along my jawline and under my chin. It glides so easily, and just by using that one product, I feel like I am able to give my skin such great, yet subtle, dimension.”

Emily Cheng

As a makeup artist to stars like Laura Harrier, Yara Shadidi, and Ella Mai, Emily Cheng has more than a few tricks up her sleeve. But using mascara for both the eyelashes and as an eyeliner is one of her best kept secrets. She uses Too Faced Better Than Sex to make the eyes pop.

“When I was in Paris a few months ago, my personal liquid liner had run out and I was in a rush, so I used my Too Faced Better Than Sex Waterproof Mascara with an angled brush and it worked perfectly,” she reveals. “The consistency was like a gel liner, and I felt like it stayed on even longer than my usual waterproof liquid liner.”

Deja Smith

Emmy Award-nominated makeup artist Deja Smith uses paw paw cream as a lip balm, hand salve, and as a highlighter. Her go-to choice is Lucas’ Paw Paw Ointment.

“I use this little tube for everything, from keeping my lips moisturized to soothing my sandpaper dry hands after disinfecting the house and washing them,” she explains. “It’s even the best no makeup, makeup highlighter for Zoom calls with that special someone. I dab a little on my lips and use the residual to add a luminescent pop to the arch of my brow and cheekbones. This ointment is effective and my quarantine must-have.”

Sarah Tanno

Lady Gaga’s go-to makeup artist Sarah Tanno loves using Haus Laboratories Glam Attack in Angel Baby on the lips, as an eyeshadow, as well as a highlighter.

“This is a liquid shimmer powder. It goes on as a liquid and dries as a powder,” Tanno says. “I used the applicator to apply all over my eyelids. I tapped a small amount on the apples of my cheeks and blended it up to high points of my cheeks for a healthy-looking highlight. Lastly, I added a touch to the center of my lips to add a pop of shimmer. One product equals a full makeup look in under five minutes!”

Daniel Chinchilla

KVD Vegan Beauty’s Cat Eye Ambassador Daniel Chinchilla uses the same liquid eyeliner for the eyes and to create faux freckles: KVD Vegan Beauty Tattoo Eyeliner in Mad Max Brown.

“Tattoo Liner can give you a flawless cat eye, but also, freckles! Because of Tattoo Liner’s super fine brush tip, it’s super easy to give yourself the sharpest cat eye you’ve ever had,” he shares. “And while you’re at it, gently press the tip of the Tattoo Liner onto your cheeks and nose for some super subtle freckles. One of the best things is that it is waterproof and you won’t have to worry about any smudging.”

Christy Coleman

Makeup artist and chief artistic officer at Beautycounter Christy Coleman says you can use your bar soap as a body or hand wash, as well as a brow gel. She recommends Beautycounter’s Citrus Mimosa Body Bar.

“The soap helps to thicken the brow and make them stay in place,” she says. “First, fill your brow in with a pencil, then using the spoolie side of an eyebrow brush or pencil, go back over them with soap.”

InStyle article

Does A Face Oil Really Work?

Well … oil-based cleansers are good to remove makeup, rosehip oil is used on the face and neck to give better slip for massage tools, or simply applied to the a very dehydrated face to give a more hydrated appearance (note this statement).

However, and it can vary from person to person, chemical formulation and dermatologist statements regarding facial oils prove that this step is not as crucial and beneficial to the skin as people have been led to believe via marketing.

Whether you have oily or dry skin, topical oils alone cannot give you a level of moisture that’s required for healthy skin. If you apply it on oily skin – you’re creating even more problems right there, or if you apply it on dry skin – it’ll only give the appearance of hydration, not the actual skincare benefits you’re looking for.

What does the oil do, then?

“Most oils that are applied to the skin end up forming more of a protective barrier on its surface, rather than actually penetrating the skin,” Dr. Hollmig states. So, although oils are moisturizing and may indirectly increase the amount of hydration in the skin, they are not technically hydrating (SELF Magazine).

The crucial factor here is the size of the fatty acid molecules that make up the oil. If they’re too big to get through the skin barrier, they sit on top and act as occlusives. If they’re small enough to get through, they may be able to penetrate to deeper layers and strengthen the stratum corneum. For instance, research suggests that jojoba oil and argan oil can actually help repair the skin barrier.

Plus, some oils come with other benefits, such as antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, that might make them beneficial for certain skin concerns. Whether or not an oil is the best choice for that issue is another question (TODAY).

Save oil for the final step of your skin-care routine. If you apply an oil first, any moisturizer that follows won’t be able to fully penetrate the oil barrier; it’s like applying lotion over a wet suit. Remember, oils are only the gatekeepers, not producers, of hydration, so load up on humectants first, and then pile on the oil afterward to keep moisture from escaping (The Cut).

Oils CAN clog your pores! But not all oils. Mineral oil is a chronic offender, as well as olive oil, oil du jour, and coconut, easily clog pores, too. So which oils don’t cause breakouts? The answer depends on you. Though there are oils that are less likely to irritate, like marula and argan, your unique genetic skin makeup will determine your oil tolerance. It’s annoying to admit, but trial and error is your best bet at determining what will work for you.

If you want to incorporate using a facial oil, consider your skin type and needs, conduct sufficient research, seek advice from a dermatologist and definitely do a test-run to see if your skin can handle a specific formulation of your chosen oil.

References
Video referenced
SELF article
TODAY article
PaulasChoice article
The Cut article