Haus Labs By Lady Gaga Is Finally Available to Shop at Sephora

Here’s some great news for Beauty Insiders and Little Monsters everywhere: You can now shop singer, actress, and entrepreneur Lady Gaga’s makeup brand, Haus Labs, at Sephora. The star has teamed up with the retailer to release new and improved versions of her brand’s coveted products.

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #81 series on my blog.

I always wanted to partner with Sephora,” Gaga tells BAZAAR.com. “I used to go to Sephora all the time as a young girl around 13 or 14 years old, I would go in and explore. I didn’t really have the money to buy a lot, so I would buy the Benefit Cosmetics Hoola Bronzer.” So to have her very own line there is a full-circle moment. “I also love Sephora as a company—the people who work there are really nice, and they really believe in what we do, which means a lot to me—they’re our number one fan,” she says.

Although Gaga has seen much brand success since Haus Labs’ initial launch in 2019, she says there’s still more work to be done when it comes to mastering the ins and outs of the beauty industry. “I’d say the first thing I’ve absolutely learned as a beauty founder and creator was that I had a lot to learn,” Gaga says. “When I first began this company, I had a sense of my own artistry and love of artistry, but my knowledge of the beauty industry was much more limited. It took me a couple of years to really hone in on what I wanted this company to be.” 

The line is evolving, without losing the original vision. “From the beginning, I always wanted to create a brand that was about empowering people to their makeup and helping people feel uplifted by makeup, but now, I’m looking to take it a step further,” she says.

The new Haus Labs by Lady Gaga line consists of 90 different Clean at Sephora–certified products across seven key categories, including all-over paints for eyes, lips, cheeks, gel-powder bronzers and highlighters, hydrating lip oils, gel pencil eyeliners, and more. The brand will also continue its expansion with a planned rollout into 500 Sephora stores by the end of this year and additional product launches planned in three new categories.

In a crowded landscape, the star insists that Haus Labs by Lady Gaga is not just another celebrity-driven beauty line, or line with a few fringe skin care benefits. “There are definitely brands that have skin-benefiting ingredients added to their makeup—we are unique in that we’re also clean,” Gaga says. “But what I will say—and I say this kindly—is what I’ve noticed with a lot of products is that people will say, ‘Hey, we’ve added hyaluronic acid to this tinted moisturizer,’ but they won’t have put enough of the ingredient in for it to be skin optimizing or functional. So it’s sort of like putting a few sprinkles on the top of a cupcake but you can’t really taste them.” 

The revamped Haus Labs by Lady Gaga products, she says, focus on skin care—and then some. “We have now put super-charged ingredients into our makeup, so it’s infused with skin care. And we use futuristic clean formulas that go beyond industry standards, with a huge color assortment. These are artistry products without compromising performance and value.

As someone who suffers from fibromyalgia, a condition that is often accompanied by chronic pain, it was important to the star to feature medicinal ingredients, like fermented arnica, in the newest iteration of Haus Labs by Lady Gaga. “Both our Power Sculpt Velvet Bronzer and Bio-Radiant Gel-Powder Highlighter are infused with our proprietary complex of fermented arnica, which is 860 percent more potent than conventional arnica,” the star explains. “We did this because I have fibromyalgia and chronic pain, so I’ve always used arnica as a way to combat inflammation in my body. I thought, I wonder if this could also calm down the skin—turns out that it does. And I also have a lot of pattern redness in my face, so we put the ingredient in our bronzer and highlighter.”

The added ingredients are intentional but don’t take away from the payoff of the product itself. “While I’m wearing this makeup, my face is getting treated for inflammation all day long with very high efficacy,” she says. “So that’s the difference: It’s not just about the formula, but about the intensity and efficacy of the formula. How truly good it is for the skin as opposed to being a gimmick or just an idea.

Aside from updating ingredients and formulas across the entire Haus Labs collection, Gaga says her intention behind the new launch is to ultimately create makeup that matters while making a larger difference. “Even our packaging is sustainable,” the star says. “When you see it in stores at Sephora, you’re going to be able to see exactly the color that you’re buying—you’re not going to buy something, get home, and realize you bought the wrong shade.”

As far as her favorite Haus Labs by Lady Gaga product to wear for major events? “I would definitely say that on red carpets, I always wear our The Edge Precision Brow Pencil. It’s my favorite brow pencil, because you can get that perfect edge across the bottom, which gives you that sharp look with your brows while making those featherlike strokes,” she says. And she reveals another trick that helps give her that bright-eyed look: “Something else I always do on the red carpet is wear white liner in my waterline—it’s a trick to make the eyes look bigger, and one of the inspirations behind why we wanted this [version of Haus Labs] to be so clean. Our Optic Intensity Eco Gel Eyeliner Pencil has argan oil and vitamin E as well, so it’s safe for my waterline.” 

Haus Labs by Lady Gaga is available now online at hauslabs.com and sephora.com.

HARPERS BAZAAR

Lady Gaga’s Haus Labs Signs Exclusive Retail Partnership with Sephora

Lady Gaga’s Haus Labs (formerly known as Haus Laboratories) is getting a facelift. On June 9, the beauty brand will launch a new revamped product line exclusively with Sephora.

Haus Labs originally launched in 2018 as the first exclusive beauty brand to partner with Amazon—but the new Haus Labs products will not be sold on the e-tailer’s site.
 
In addition to overhauled distribution, every consumer touchpoint with Haus Labs has been rethought. Packaging, formulas, logos and advertisements have all been given an update.
 
Featuring cruelty-free and vegan formulas and sustainable packaging, Haus Labs by Lady Gaga will introduce a new line of products across eye, lip and cheek. Furthermore, the brand promises these stress-tested formulas are science-backed and biocompatible, but “still pack the same punch of vibrant shades and longwear that Haus Labs is known for.”
 
Lady Gaga welcomes you to join this new chapter of Haus Labs, with supercharged products created with innovative formulas that will shape the future of the beauty industry. She believes artistry should be for everyone, and that no one should have to damage their skin or sacrifice their principles to be self-expressive,” the brand said in a statement.
 
The new products are created with the new HausTech Powered Innovation, that merges together the fields of science and skincare to create makeup that works to make skin look and feel better while still delivering high performance and high pigments.
 
See the brand’s announcement on Instagram below:

BEAUTY PACKAGING

What Does It Take For A Celebrity Beauty Brand To Succeed In 2021?

In November 2015, Kylie Jenner launched three lip kits. The kits, consisting of a lip pencil and liquid lipstick available in a pinky nude, a beige neutral and a deep brown, sold out almost immediately.

Jenner’s wasn’t the first celebrity beauty brand to launch. In 2009, Australian model Miranda Kerr founded Kora Organics, while actor Drew Barrymore launched Flower Cosmetics in 2013. But Jenner’s was the first to leverage the reach, engagement and influence of its founder in the social media era. Nearly six years later, the lip kits have evolved into a full makeup and skincare brand and in 2019, she sold 51 percent of her business (at a valuation of $1.2 billion) to Coty for $600 million.

The rise of celebrity beauty brands

Today, the legacy of Kylie Cosmetics—as well as Rihanna’s industry-changing Fenty Beauty, which launched in 2017—is everywhere, as celebrities jump on the beauty bandwagon. There’s Lady Gaga’s Haus Laboratories; Selena Gomez’s Rare Beauty; Kim Kardashian West’s KKW Beauty; Pharrell Williams’ Humanrace; Millie Bobby Brown’s Florence by Mills; Jennifer Lopez’s JLo Beauty; Halsey’s About-FaceVictoria Beckham; Paris Hilton’s Pro DNA, and many more.

Cardi B has teased a forthcoming makeup range, as has YouTuber James Charles, while Hailey Bieber, Gwen Stefani and Ariana Grande all reportedly filed trademarks for beauty products. Welcome to the golden age of the celebrity beauty brand.

It used to be that celebrities were the faces of beauty brands, starring in campaigns, endorsing the products in interviews and wearing the makeup on red carpets. But being the face is no longer enough—celebrities want ownership, becoming major players in the industry in their own right. And with the growth of the global beauty market over the last few years—the industry was valued at $532 billion in 2019—it’s not surprising.

“Celebrities are increasingly aware of the quick financial gains to be made, with the opportunity to monetize a loyal online fanbase and use their social media page as a marketing platform,” says Gabriella Beckwith, beauty consultant at market research firm Euromonitor.

But for everyone chasing a Fenty success story, fame and following alone won’t ensure sales. As the market becomes increasingly crowded, brands will have to rely on that notoriously slippery concept of authenticity to gain the trust and business of their target audience.

The power of authenticity

Today, beauty consumers have never been more educated about what they are putting on their face or more demanding about the quality. It’s why it matters that Pharrell Williams collaborated with his longtime dermatologist, Dr Elena Jones, for his skincare brand Humanrace. It’s why Halsey prefaced the announcement of her makeup brand About-Face in January by establishing her credibility. “Many of you know I’ve done my own makeup for a long time,” she wrote on Twitter. It’s also why actress Millie Bobby Brown drew criticism after posting a skincare tutorial in which she seemingly didn’t actually apply any of the products to her face. Brown issued an apology a few days later, writing, “I’m still learning the best way to share my routines as I get to know this space better—I’m not an expert.”

Eyebrows were also raised when Jennifer Lopez recently said that her age-defying skin was the mainly the result of years of olive oil use—despite selling a new line of skincare products (her multitasking serum costs $118). Followers were skeptical of these claims, with some even suggesting the singer had had Botox, to which Lopez responded: “For the 500 millionth time. I have never done Botox or any injectables or surgery!”

At the other end of the spectrum, Victoria Beckham established her credentials as a serious player by partnering with industry favorite Dr Augustinus Bader for her first skincare launch. “We tend to think of celebrity brands as inauthentic partnerships—traditionally, that is often what they were,” says Sarah Creal, co-founder and CEO of Victoria Beckham Beauty. “Celebrities can no longer slap their name on something and not have their communities realize that’s what’s happening. Those who are in it for the short term or inauthentically won’t last—consumers are savvy.”

A long-time beauty executive, Creal met Beckham at Estée Lauder, with whom the designer launched a capsule cosmetics collection, and was drawn to her passion and vision. While she says there is “no doubt” the former Spice Girl is a celebrity, they don’t consider Victoria Beckham Beauty a celebrity brand, but rather a bona fide indie startup. “Having Victoria as a partner obviously shines a light on the brand that we wouldn’t have otherwise, but we still have to stand up to the scrutiny and credibility that any new beauty brand would need to.”

The importance of quality over influence

Celebrities undeniably wield great influence over their following, but if they want to convince consumers to buy their products, this credibility and, most importantly, gold-standard quality, is non-negotiable. “People aren’t just buying into the face—they equally expect the product to work as hard as any other brand they’d engage with,” says Victoria Buchanan, senior futures analyst at strategic foresight consultancy The Future Laboratory.

The audience agrees. “[I think some] products by celebrities are bad quality because it is believed that people will buy them regardless,” says Marion, a 17-year-old gen-Z consumer from Toronto. “But the product itself should be more important than the celebrity or advertising.” It’s quality that she cites as the reason for buying the few products from celebrity brands that she’s purchased—a Rare Beauty highlighter with good reviews, a Fenty concealer because of its range of shades.

While a celebrity might make consumers aware of a brand (they’ll pay close attention if it’s someone they’re a fan of), it’s rare that they would buy a beauty product because of the name alone. On the whole, they remain wary of products, particularly when it comes to skincare, do their own research, and always listen to expert advice.

Like all trends, the celebrity beauty bubble will eventually burst. The sharp decline of celebrity fragrances following its 2011 peak shows what can happen when consumers move on from a category. Nothing lasts forever and we’ve already seen a gradual shift towards hair brands, such as Tracee Ellis Ross’s Pattern, Priyanka Chopra Jonas’s Anomaly, and sexual wellness products via Cara Delevingne and Dakota Johnson.

When that moment comes, those brands left standing will be the ones that have established their authenticity and credibility, played to the strengths of their creators’ personal ethos and identity, and, above all, proved their quality. As noisy and loud as your social media presence might be, in the end, nothing talks like results.

VOGUE article

8 Makeup Artists on How to Make Their Favourite Products Multi-Purpose

Welcome to Artist Spotlight #12 series on my blog.

Daniel Martin

Makeup artist Daniel Martin is a fan of using liquid lipstick not only for the lips, but also as a cheek stain. His favorite product for this hack? Honest Beauty’s Liquid Lipstick in Goddess.

“I love using this liquid lipstick on the face, as well as lips, to add a hint of a continuous flush on the apples of the cheek to bronzed skin,” he shares. “Jessica Alba taught me this trick!”

Kate Lee

Makeup expert Kate Lee swears by using facial oil as a moisturizer, hair treatment, and body scent. Her go-to is Chanel’s Huile de Jasmin Revitalizing Facial Oil.

“During this time of uncertainty, my focus is mainly on the wellness of mind and spirit,” says Lee. “I find that I am more nurturing and minimal in my daily routine and I am taking a break from makeup. I have found that now, more than ever, my olfactory senses really influence my mood. I use Chanel Huile de Jasmin on my face and décolletage daily and using what’s left on my hands, I run it through my hair.”

“The hair holds scent very well and to be gently followed by the scent of Jasmin feels very nurturing,” she continues. “In place of wearing perfume, I’ve been mixing a few drops of Huile de Jasmin into my favorite clean, fragrance-free body lotion by Nécessaire.”

Nikki DeRoest

obbi Brown artist-in-residence Nikki DeRoest likes to apply contour stick to not only add dimesion to cheekbones, but also to the eyes, forehead, and jawline. Her weapon of choice is Westman Atelier’s Face Trace Contour Stick.

“I like to use this stick first in the obvious spot, where it’s intended for use: in the hollows of my cheeks,” she shares. “I start at my ear and swipe inwards, stopping halfway on my cheek. This product is so easy to use and can easily be blended out with fingers or any type of semi-firm brush. While I’m at it, and quickly multi-tasking with my makeup, I also love to swipe a bit just above the crease of my eye on my outer brow bone, on the hollow of my temples and the other edges of my forehead, and of course, along my jawline and under my chin. It glides so easily, and just by using that one product, I feel like I am able to give my skin such great, yet subtle, dimension.”

Emily Cheng

As a makeup artist to stars like Laura Harrier, Yara Shadidi, and Ella Mai, Emily Cheng has more than a few tricks up her sleeve. But using mascara for both the eyelashes and as an eyeliner is one of her best kept secrets. She uses Too Faced Better Than Sex to make the eyes pop.

“When I was in Paris a few months ago, my personal liquid liner had run out and I was in a rush, so I used my Too Faced Better Than Sex Waterproof Mascara with an angled brush and it worked perfectly,” she reveals. “The consistency was like a gel liner, and I felt like it stayed on even longer than my usual waterproof liquid liner.”

Deja Smith

Emmy Award-nominated makeup artist Deja Smith uses paw paw cream as a lip balm, hand salve, and as a highlighter. Her go-to choice is Lucas’ Paw Paw Ointment.

“I use this little tube for everything, from keeping my lips moisturized to soothing my sandpaper dry hands after disinfecting the house and washing them,” she explains. “It’s even the best no makeup, makeup highlighter for Zoom calls with that special someone. I dab a little on my lips and use the residual to add a luminescent pop to the arch of my brow and cheekbones. This ointment is effective and my quarantine must-have.”

Sarah Tanno

Lady Gaga’s go-to makeup artist Sarah Tanno loves using Haus Laboratories Glam Attack in Angel Baby on the lips, as an eyeshadow, as well as a highlighter.

“This is a liquid shimmer powder. It goes on as a liquid and dries as a powder,” Tanno says. “I used the applicator to apply all over my eyelids. I tapped a small amount on the apples of my cheeks and blended it up to high points of my cheeks for a healthy-looking highlight. Lastly, I added a touch to the center of my lips to add a pop of shimmer. One product equals a full makeup look in under five minutes!”

Daniel Chinchilla

KVD Vegan Beauty’s Cat Eye Ambassador Daniel Chinchilla uses the same liquid eyeliner for the eyes and to create faux freckles: KVD Vegan Beauty Tattoo Eyeliner in Mad Max Brown.

“Tattoo Liner can give you a flawless cat eye, but also, freckles! Because of Tattoo Liner’s super fine brush tip, it’s super easy to give yourself the sharpest cat eye you’ve ever had,” he shares. “And while you’re at it, gently press the tip of the Tattoo Liner onto your cheeks and nose for some super subtle freckles. One of the best things is that it is waterproof and you won’t have to worry about any smudging.”

Christy Coleman

Makeup artist and chief artistic officer at Beautycounter Christy Coleman says you can use your bar soap as a body or hand wash, as well as a brow gel. She recommends Beautycounter’s Citrus Mimosa Body Bar.

“The soap helps to thicken the brow and make them stay in place,” she says. “First, fill your brow in with a pencil, then using the spoolie side of an eyebrow brush or pencil, go back over them with soap.”

InStyle article