Circular Beauty Can End the Industry’s Waste Problem

One only has to look as far as their own bathroom vanity to know that the beauty industry has a sustainability problem—generating a cited 120 billion units of waste annually of mostly plastic. This ugly truth about the multibillion dollar sector comes along with a bevy of alarming consequences related to ingredient sourcing, environmentally hazardous formulations, and wasteful distribution. For years, the industry status quo has been to prioritize profits in the midst of staunch competition, with beauty brands rapidly launching new products to keep up with the pace of mercurial trends. We know we can’t just recycle our way out of this mess.

But how’s this for hope? The eponymously named, New Zealand–based, luxury green beauty brand founded by Emma Lewisham is officially the first in the world to model a solution. In an unprecedented move, the brand has achieved a 100 percent circular business model, complete with carbon positive status, defying the global beauty market’s competitive environment by making the intellectual property public. “We genuinely want to see change,” Lewisham tells BAZAAR.com. “The problems we face are so much greater than the success of one business or brand, and if we are going to solve them, collaboration is key. We must tear down the barriers of competition once and for all. … This has to be the future of beauty.

This achievement garnered the written endorsement from Lewisham’s lifelong hero, the world-renowned environmentalist, ethologist, and a United Nations Messenger of Peace, Dr. Jane Goodall. “Emma Lewisham may be setting a new benchmark in beauty, but they are also setting a benchmark for how all industries should be operating—circular, waste free, and carbon positive. I wholeheartedly endorse Emma Lewisham’s Beauty Circle and all the systems they have put in place as a business striving to make the world a better place,” Goodall writes.

WHAT IS CIRCULAR BEAUTY?

The term refers to a green business model that keeps materials in use through repair and reuse, extends product life-cycle through quality, and purposely minimizes waste. “The beauty industry is currently built around the linear economic model, where we take from the earth, make something, then consumers throw it away. This take-make-waste system is responsible for an unprecedented amount of waste,” Lewisham says. “It may be appeasing profits, but it isn’t supporting the one thing we cannot live without: Earth.”

Being the first luxury beauty brand to achieve a circular model including carbon positivity meant undergoing an extensive process of research and development, collaborating with independent environmental organization agencies like Toitū Envirocare to track their carbon emissions at each stage of production. “It has been the result of many years of hard work and dedication by our team to get to this point,” she says. “Our circularity journey has been underway since inception and has been a labor of love and tenacity.” She adds that this meant investing heavily into the research and development of packaging, machinery, and business processes to allow for every product to be refilled, kept in use, and out of landfills.

REUSABLE, REFILLABLE PACKAGING

Achieving circularity relied heavily upon innovating packaging. “The single largest contributor of carbon emissions in the beauty industry is single-use packaging,” she says. “In mapping our carbon emissions, we have been able to prove that when buying our circularly designed refills—as opposed to brand-new packaging—carbon emissions are reduced by up to 74 percent.” It is important to Lewisham that we understand the significance of reusing packaging, via endlessly refillable containers, as opposed to recycling. “While recycling is part of circularity, reuse must always come first,” she notes. “Typically, refilling requires significantly less energy and resources, therefore emitting less greenhouse gases.”

More importantly, she points out that beauty recycling is not as streamlined of a process as we would like to believe. She notes that the recycling of beauty packaging requires specialized systems; it is simply not possible through typical curbside pickups. “Unless someone is prepared to cover the cost of having it recycled, it ends up either in landfills, scattered through our oceans, or burnt into greenhouse gases,” Lewisham explains. “If brands are to rely on the recyclability of their packaging, it is essential that they take responsibility for ensuring that it is actually recycled.

Further, the skincare entrepreneur is calling for an end to single-use beauty packaging. “After all, why would you invest time and resources into producing something that is inherently designed to be thrown away?” she asks. “And economically, surely, we should be reusing materials that we have invested in producing as opposed to sending them and their inherent value straight to a landfill.

CARBON POSITIVITY

Yet another aspect of Lewisham’s achievement has been going beyond carbon neutrality by becoming certified carbon positive. Carbon neutral is a status brands achieve when they track their carbon emissions (caused by resource use in production, transportation, creation, et cetera), and then removing the equivalent amount of carbon from the atmosphere, often through financial donations to offsetting agencies. But being carbon positive—also known as “carbon negative” or “climate positive” depending on the certifying agency—indicates that the brand is taking more carbon emissions out of the atmosphere than it puts in.

To become certified carbon positive, we worked with Toitū Envirocare, who are a world-leading independent environmental certification agency,” Lewisham says. “Over 12 months, we measured the carbon emissions emitted at each stage of our products’ life cycles, including growing, harvesting, transportation, product packaging, and end of life. This allowed us to clearly see where we could reduce carbon emissions and enabled us to implement an extensive carbon-reduction strategy as a first point of call.” It took work, but it created a new baseline of eco-responsibility for beauty brands to aspire to.

COLLABORATION OVER COMPETITION

The final step of Lewisham’s planet-friendly commitment has been making the fruits of their extensive labor—the Emma Lewisham Beauty Blueprint—public for other brands to follow suit. “Sharing our Beauty Blueprint wasn’t a decision I made lightly, as it is undoubtedly one of our brand’s competitive advantages,” Lewisham says. “However, none of it matters unless other brands join us on a circular and carbon positive path. … I hope that by sharing our Beauty Blueprint, other brands can capitalize on our innovation and investment to accelerate their transition to a circular and carbon positive model.

Poignantly, Lewisham points out that alone, the brand cannot hope to achieve the true shifts in the industry that she passionately hopes will come to pass for the sake of her young daughter. Her belief in the power and importance of collaboration is yet another area where Goodall commends the beauty entrepreneur. “I admire Emma Lewisham’s passion for creating lasting change,” Goodall writes. “Sharing their sustainability IP industry-wide is a powerful step, and I urge all brands to follow their lead. … This is when true change begins—when we work together.

VOTING WITH YOUR DOLLARS

In August, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned that human-wrought climate change through the emission of greenhouse gases was already “irreversible” for centuries to come, causing U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres to deem the IPCC’s findings “a code red for humanity.” Experts urged steps to limit greenhouse gas emissions in order for global temperatures to stabilize in two to three decades. How? By voluntarily prioritizing elements of inclusive and green economies—models characterized by low carbon emissions and efficient resource usage, and that are socially inclusive; in other words, circular.

As beauty consumers, we can take steps to consume less, waste less, reuse packaging (or recycle it responsibly). But for the purchases we do make, we can also vote with our dollars by supporting environmentally responsible brands that put their values into concrete actions. “New Zealand beauty brand Emma Lewisham is demonstrating what it means to be a truly sustainable business,” Goodall writes. “Through their carbon positive and circular business model, Emma Lewisham is creating environmental prosperity and showing their peers that this business model is not just possible but paramount if we are to make a meaningful difference.”

HARPER’S BAZZAR

How Mushrooms Could Help Solve the Beauty Industry’s Waste Problem

What does it mean to be beautiful on planet Earth in 2020? In search of clear skin, a mellow demeanor, the perfect eyebrows, and a high vibe, what are we reckoning with? From sheet masks to disposable salon sandals to plastic lining in the shipping of even eco-friendly materials, waste permeates the beauty industry in ways that can no longer be overlooked. According to the United Nations, half of all plastic is designed to be used only once, and environmental scientists are suggesting that plastics will serve as a geological indicator of the Anthropocene era, despite becoming ubiquitous only within the past hundred years. It’s not cute that Styrofoam takes up an estimated 30% of space in landfills and lingers for about 500 years, that trash floats in the oceans, and that microplastics exist in our food supply. With packaging accounting for 40% of plastic usage, beauty brands are turning to a natural solution: mushroom mycelium.

“Mycelium is the root structure of mushrooms,” explains Loney Abrams, florist, artist, and co-owner of Wretched Flowers. “Mycelium networks can take on any form and once they colonize a form, it’s incredibly durable, insulating, and flame resistant”—properties which make mushrooms an ideal substitute for Styrofoam and plastic. Abrams and her partner, Johnny Stanish, have considered mycelium in a variety of settings. It was the material that made up their Bondage vases (also designed in special colors for a collaboration with the sustainable clothing brand Eden), which function conjunctly as vessels and shipping containers. Stanish and Abrams dream of a day when mycelium can replace Styrofoam in the shipping of large pieces of art, and make the case that mycelium could benefit myriad industries, from art and flowers to beauty. Wretched Flowers sources from and is inspired by Ecovative Design, the company that has been growing mycelium in the U.S., Europe, and New Zealand to combat single-use plastics since 2007.

“Mushrooms are nature’s recycling system,” explains Gavin McIntyre, cofounder of Ecovative Design. “They’re decomposers. Mycelium grows really quickly, and for the industrial process, [we’re able to grow it] in days.” Many compostable products, such as the compostable cups that you see at coffee shops, are made from polylactic acid (PLA), a corn sugar fermented by bacteria, and are only industrially compostable. Mycelium products biodegrade within a month in a home compost, meaning they don’t need to be sent out to a facility. I asked McIntyre about composting in New York City, where the mayor has recently suspended the composting program, and he pointed out that you could technically cut up the packaging and put it out next to a tree or—though he doesn’t recommend this—a local body of water, as the product is safely marine compostable and used to protect scientific buoys in oceans around the world by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Mycelium acts like a glue and is grown into molds (no pun intended) fitting any shape, from packaging inserts to sculpture to beauty applicators. Ecovative Design grows mycelium beauty and skin-care products, including eye masks, sheet masks, and makeup wedges. They are also partnering with beauty, fashion, art, and technology brands to customize packaging.

One such brand is Hudson Hemp, a farm and CBD company built on land owned by Abby Rockefeller and her family in the Catskill mountains. I spoke with cofounder Melany Dobson about how and why she decided to integrate mycelium packaging into Hudson Hemp’s CBD line, Treaty. Dobson’s team grows hemp as part of a dynamic crop rotation alongside grains that supply flour to local bakeries, livestock feed for dairy farms, and rye and hops for brewers and distillers. Part of the mission of Hudson Hemp is to develop soil that relies on nutrients that come from the farm itself; since mycelium goes hand in hand with soil health, it was already in mind. “I learned about Ecovative through Seed—a probiotic brand that has used Ecovative since 2018 in their original packaging—and decided to go for it,” Dobson says. This ethos of open-source sharing when it comes to sustainability is one that is inevitably moving the industry forward. Since its launch, all Hudson Hemp CBD has been shipped in custom Ecovative packaging.

How does change happen in the beauty industry? I think about my own brand, Masha Tea, and how the transition to more thoughtful packaging finally happened when I saw an Instagram post by Nu Swim (which, incidentally, fills my bathing suit collection with perfect fits made from regenerated ocean waste) about the biodegradable packaging company Ecoenclose. The fact of the matter is, companies are always looking to one another to see how they can improve. On a larger scale, as Dobson notes, “Multinational companies [look to] small brands once they get attention. It helps set trends. If Treaty uses Ecovative, L’Oréal starts thinking about it too.”

This idea was at the heart of my conversation with Rodrigo Garcia Alvarez, founder of Amen, a vegan line of candles produced in the historic fragrance capital of Grasse, France. “The new luxury is when things are done by ethical and sustainability standards and not just by how things look,” he says. Amen candles, which are sold at Dover Street Market, 10 Corso Como, and The Conservatory, are all shipped in mycelium grown in Amsterdam. In fact, Garcia Alvarez sees mycelium as the future of luxury, with the goal of inspiring 10 major brands to incorporate mushroom materials, then 100, and eventually a world in which mycelium can “reach the economics of scale and efficient cost,” making mushrooms more accessible in the way that plastics are today.

Eyes are on mushrooms as the future of our reckoning with waste. “Why is CBD a beauty product?” I asked Dobson toward the end of our conversation about Hudson Hemp. “Because it brings the inner-outer beauty conversation full circle,” she answered. “If you’re feeling how you need to feel in the moment you’re in, that is beautiful.” As beauty brands consider how best to meet the needs of the earth alongside those of their consumers, mycelium reminds us that there are exciting alternatives to a wasteful existence.

VOGUE article

Let’s Ditch Sheet Face Masks!

WHERE DID SHEET MASKS ORIGINATE FROM?

Sheet masks originated from Japan and South Korea, known for their dedication to cosmetics and skin care. Today, sheet masks are widely popular in Asia as a whole. Sheet masks have recently began to change the beauty industry and gained popularity in the U.S by various celebrities utilizing sheet masks and posting about it on social media. From the recent study conducted by NPD Group in the USA, the sale of masks increased by about 60%, overwhelming other categories in the skincare business (ORGAID).

HOW DOES A SHEET MASK WORK?

There is a sheet fully soaked with concentrated serum, which consists of many beneficial ingredients to the skin, such as hyaluronic acid and vitamins. These ingredients are in the water phase as dissolved. The sheet prevents quick evaporation of the water phase and extends the time frame the ingredients require to penetrate deep into the skin. This results in the sheet masks outperforming the effects of the traditional serum-type skincare even when applied once.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS?

They bring fast effects in regards to enhancing the skin. The serum is filled with various vitamins and minerals, and doesn’t dry out the skin compared to the paste-type face mask. The sheet on the face helps the serum to soak into the skin a little longer. Some of the sheets also claim to brighten and make the skin firm. Basically, sheet masks are an inexpensive alternative compared to going to a spa: convenient, easy to apply, and brings a glowing effect to the skin.

WHAT ARE THE DRAWBACKS?

Their purpose is to nourish, not exfoliate or cleanse the skin. Sheet masks are probably not as effective at exfoliating or cleaning the skin compared to the paste-type mask. In addition, serum from low-quality sheet masks evaporates quickly, even before it gets soaked into the deeper layer of the skin. Currently, ORGAID researchers are using sheet masks made with high technology to avoid those problems (ORGAID).

WHAT INGREDIENTS ARE USED IN THE SERUM?

Depending on what function the sheet mask is made to perform, the serum contains various different ingredients and concentrations that are commonly used, such as aloe vera and vitamin C, to more unusual ones such as pearl, snail extract, and seaweed. Also, for prevention against bacteria/fungi contamination, most sheet masks contain chemical preservatives such as parabens, and recently phenoxyethanol, which are not good for the skin.

WHAT MATERIALS ARE THE SHEETS MADE OUT OF?

Diverse types of fabric are used for the sheet masks. Four most used materials from worst to best: 

* Non-woven fiber – Inexpensive, difficult mobility, low capacity to deliver serum into the skin
* Cotton – Inexpensive, difficult mobility, low capacity to deliver serum into the skin (but better than the non-woven fiber)
* Hydrogel – Little pricey, great absorption system, gel-type consistency, two separate parts (top and bottom) to apply on face, difficult mobility, fits the shape of the face well
* Bio-cellulose – Expensive, all-natural material, adheres to the skin well, better absorption properties, comfortable mobility.

MATERIALS END UP IN LANDFILLS!

First, you have the plastic or foil packaging. Then more plastic wrapped around the mask itself. In ten years, there’s probably going to be a whole trash island made entirely of sheet masks. 

Sure, there are brands out there with compostable options – though most people probably end up throwing them out anyway – and ones made from plant fiber. Be honest, though. If you’re looking at a $3 plastic-laden mask or a $10 plant one, which would you choose? Besides, many of the sheet masks on the market are soaked in things that may make them non-biodegradable (INSIDER).

WHAT CAN YOU DO IF YOU WANT TO BE MORE ECO-CONSCIOUS?

The easiest answer, hands down, would be to avoid using non-recyclable, non-compostable, single-use sheet masks altogether. But that’s not so easy for everyone. 

If you absolutely love your sheet masks and can’t give them up, just know there are other options out there that will yield similar results. As mentioned above, you can try to find products that use organic, biodegradable and recyclable materials. Korean beauty brand Innisfree has a line of biodegradable sheet masks, for example. Andalou Naturals, another beauty brand, also carries masks that are said to be biodegradable. The outer packaging, however, isn’t necessarily recyclable. 

You can also look for masks sold in packs, as opposed to individually wrapped ones. They do exist, and they don’t generate as much plastic waste as the single-use masks. Some people even make their own sheet masks by soaking clean face cloths with their own serums or mixtures of desired ingredients (HUFFPOST). 

At the very least, do your research. If you really want to be more responsible, look up your local municipality’s recycling and composting guidelines. 

ORGAID Article
INSIDER Article
HUFFPOST Article

Bye-Bye Makeup Wipes

At the end of a long day, we all love the ease of removing our makeup with a single-use makeup wipe without a second thought. Then we add cotton rounds for removing eye makeup and using micellar water. But in recent months there has been a growing awareness of just how bad these wipes are for the environment!

Here’s why they aren’t the best solution for makeup removal and some alternatives:

  • While using, you’re tagging on your skin and eyes up, down, and sideways, increasing the speed of the aging process and saggy skin – not a good look!
  • Most of these wipes contain non-biodegradable plastic fibres such as polyester and rayon.

“One group estimates that about 20 million pounds of single-use wipes (including baby wipes and disinfecting wipes) are disposed of every day in the U.S. Most end up in landfills and don’t rapidly breakdown!” (Source: RealSimple)

So, what can we do to reduce our input to this horrible statistic?

  • Use an environmentally-friendly washcloth, or an organic cotton fiber cloth, to clean your face with an organic makeup remover;
  • There are a lot of great cleansing balms that only require the use of your hands – best tools!

What products do you use to remove your makeup? Let me know in the comments below!