Tips For New Makeup Artists

  • Hand placement – never place your hand on top of a client’s head while working on their face, put it on your hip, hold another brush in it, or place it on the client’s chin. This is especially important with brides or models who have their hair already done. Plus, we tend to focus a lot on the step we’re doing that we might not notice just how hard our grip is on the client’s head.
  • Your pinky finger is your best friend – it serves as a resting point for your hand while blending eyeshadow or applying eyeliner, lipliner and lipstick. It’s a balancing tool to be used instead of resting the side of your hand on the face, or hold their head.
  • Apply false lashes easily – have the client look down and to the right for their right eye, and down to the left for their left eye. This method stretches the inside corner of the client’s eyelid allowing for perfect placement of false lashes and eyeliner.
  • Use dense eyeshadow applicators for glitters/pigments – you know those cheap ones that come with palettes? They’re so dense and impactful, they’ll be able to apply the glitter/pigment with less fallout and product loss than a traditional brush.
  • Choose the right eyeshadow transition shade – this shade is placed slightly above the socket of the eye under the browbone to transition into an eyeshadow look. The best bet is to use the bronzer shade you’re using on the client. This allows for cohesiveness and sculpting.
  • Avoid and correct eyeshadow fallout – it’s recommended to do eyeshadow first and wipe off the fallout without disrupting the base makeup. Apply skincare and primer, followed by eyeshadow. Clean up the fallout by wiping it off with a cotton round with some skincare on it – that way you’re not wiping off the initial skincare.
  • Apply skincare & primers strategically – skincare should help balance out dry/oily areas while helping to prolong the wear of makeup. Many people have oily T-zones (forehead, nose, and chin) while having dryness on the cheeks. Use hydrating, mattifying, and smoothing primers in areas where they’re needed. One primer may be all that the client needs, but may be not.