Best Beauty Foods

Nutrition is important for health. An unhealthy diet can damage your metabolism, cause weight gain, and even damage organs, such as your heart and liver.
But what you eat also affects another organ — your skin.
As scientists learn more about diet and the body, it’s increasingly clear that what you eat can significantly affect the health and aging of your skin.

  • Fatty fish – salmon, mackerel, and herring, are excellent foods for healthy skin. They’re rich sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which are important for maintaining skin health.
    Omega-3 fatty acids are necessary to help keep skin thick, supple, and moisturized. In fact, an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency can cause dry skin. The omega-3 fats in fish reduce inflammation, which can cause redness and acne. They can even make your skin less sensitive to the sun’s harmful UV rays.
    Some studies show that fish oil supplements may help fight inflammatory and autoimmune conditions affecting your skin, such as psoriasis and lupus.
    Fatty fish is also a source of vitamin E, one of the most important antioxidants for your skin. Getting enough vitamin E is essential for helping protect your skin against damage from free radicals and inflammation.
  • Avocados – associated with more supple, springy skin. Preliminary evidence shows that avocados contain compounds that may help protect your skin from sun damage. UV damage to your skin can cause wrinkles and other signs of aging.
    Avocados are also a good source of vitamin E, which is an important antioxidant that helps protect your skin from oxidative damage.
    Vitamin C is also essential for healthy skin. Your skin needs it to create collagen, which is the main structural protein that keeps your skin strong and healthy.
  • Walnuts – they’re richer than most other nuts in both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.
    Zinc is essential for your skin to function properly as a barrier. It’s also necessary for wound healing and combating both bacteria and inflammation.
    Walnuts also provide small amounts of the antioxidants vitamin E and selenium, in addition to 4–5 grams of protein per ounce.
  • Sunflower seeds – One ounce (28 grams) of sunflower seeds packs 49% of the DV for vitamin E, 41% of the DV for selenium, 14% of the DV for zinc, and 5.5 grams of protein.
  • Sweet potatoes – one 1/2-cup (100-gram) serving of baked sweet potato contains enough beta carotene to provide more than six times the DV of vitamin A. Also helps keep your skin healthy by acting as a natural sunblock, preventing sunburn, cell death, and dry, wrinkled skin.
    Interestingly, high amounts of beta carotene may also add a warm, orange color to your skin, contributing to an overall healthier appearance.
  • Red or yellow bell peppers – Like sweet potatoes, bell peppers are an excellent source of beta carotene, which your body converts into vitamin A. One cup (149 grams) of chopped red bell pepper contains the equivalent of 156% of the DV for vitamin A.
    They’re also one of the best sources of vitamin C. This vitamin is necessary for creating the protein collagen, which keeps skin firm and strong. A single cup (149 grams) of bell pepper provides an impressive 211% of the DV for vitamin C.
  • Broccoli – full of many vitamins and minerals important for skin health, including zinc, vitamin A, and vitamin C (for collagen production).
    It also contains lutein, a carotenoid that works like beta carotene. Lutein helps protect your skin from oxidative damage, which can cause your skin to become dry and wrinkled.
    But broccoli florets also pack a special compound called sulforaphane, which boasts some impressive potential benefits. It may even have anti-cancer effects, including on some types of skin cancer.
    Sulforaphane is likewise a powerful protective agent against sun damage. It works in two ways: neutralizing harmful free radicals and switching on other protective systems in your body.
  • Tomatoes – a great source of vitamin C and contain all of the major carotenoids, including lycopene. Beta carotene, lutein, and lycopene have been shown to protect your skin against damage from the sun. They may also help prevent wrinkling!
  • Soy – contains isoflavones, a category of plant compounds that can either mimic or block estrogen in your body. One small study involving middle-aged women found that eating soy isoflavones every day for 8–12 weeks reduced fine wrinkles and improved skin elasticity. These isoflavones not only help to protect the cells inside your body from damage but also your skin from UV radiation — which may reduce the risk of some skin cancers.
  • Dark chocolate – After 6–12 weeks of consuming a cocoa powder high in antioxidants each day, participants in one study experienced thicker, more hydrated skin. Their skin was also less rough and scaly, less sensitive to sunburn, and had better blood flow — which brings more nutrients to your skin.
    Another study found that eating 20 grams of high-antioxidant dark chocolate per day could allow your skin to withstand over twice as much UV radiation before burning, compared with eating low-antioxidant chocolate
    Make sure to choose dark chocolate with at least 70% cocoa to maximize the benefits and keep added sugar to a minimum!
  • Green tea – help protect your skin from sun damage and aging. Green tea also improves the moisture, roughness, thickness, and elasticity of the skin.
    While green tea is a great choice for healthy skin, you may want to avoid drinking your tea with milk, as there’s evidence that milk could reduce the effect of green tea’s antioxidants!
  • Red grapes – Resveratrol helps reduce the effects of aging by slowing the production of harmful free radicals.
    This beneficial compound is also found in red wine. Unfortunately, there’s not much evidence that the amount of resveratrol you get from a glass of red wine is enough to affect your skin.

What you eat can significantly affect your skin health.

Make sure you’re getting enough essential nutrients to protect your skin. The foods on this list are great options to keep your skin healthy, strong, and attractive. Remember to drink enough water, as well!

Reference: HealthLine article

Lisa Eldridge – You Can Do It All

I have been personally inspired by Lisa Eldridge throughout my career as a makeup artist. I have used her as inspiration for my own looks as well as my clients’. From her skincare advice, successful makeup line and YouTube channel, to work with some of the most well-known celebrities and models – she’s one of the best artists who isn’t afraid to try new techniques and styles. Welcome to Artist Spotlight #9 series on my blog.

Lisa Eldridge is an English-New Zealand makeup artist, businesswoman, author, and YouTuber. She had her first big break when she was booked by ELLE magazine to work with model Cindy Crawford. From 2003 to 2013, Eldridge was Creative Director for Boots No7, where she was responsible for developing, re-designing and re-launching the brand. Eldridge, since 6 January 2015, is currently the global creative director of Lancôme, working across product development, advertising campaigns and digital strategy. In October 2015, Eldridge published the book Face Paint: The Story of Makeup.

Following a move to London, Eldridge took a course in photographic makeup artistry at Complexions, began building her portfolio and eventually signing with a makeup agency. She had her first big break when she was booked by aforementioned ELLE magazine to work with Cindy Crawford. Crawford and Eldridge subsequently worked together on several more shoots. She has been based in Paris, New York and Los Angeles, and now lives in London. Her work has appeared on the pages of British, Italian, French, Chinese and Japanese Vogue, Love, Allure, Glamour, Elle, Numéro, Harper’s Bazaar, Pop, and Lula for covers, fashion, beauty and celebrity shoots.

Eldridge has worked with the photographers Tim Walker, Mert and Marcus, Regan Cameron, Sølve Sundsbø, Rankin, Paolo Roversi, David Sims, Mario Testino, and Patrick Demarchelier. Aside from her editorial assignments, Eldridge collaborates with fashion houses and beauty brands on their international advertising campaigns and runway shows. These include Lancôme, Chloe, Alberta Ferretti, Prada, Donna Karan, Moschino, Yohji Yamamoto, and Pucci. Eldridge was named by The Business of Fashion as one of the people ‘Shaping The Global Fashion Industry’ in their Fashion 500 list for 2013.

Lisa Eldridge has a successful YouTube channel, on which she creates various makeup looks on herself and other models, shares tips and tricks, discusses skincare, and visits past decades of makeup history to recreate the looks of the times. When I attended makeup academy, I was often referred to her videos by instructors, to recreate her looks or take in her knowledge. Ever since then I’ve been a huge supporter of hers!

In February 2010, Eldridge launched her website, which has become one of the go-to sites for make-up tutorials, beauty advice and insider knowledge.

Lisa Eldridge wrote her first New York Times bestseller Face Paint, which she describes as “all about the history of makeup – something I’ve always wanted to write. It’s a hardback book (8 x 10 inches), with 60,000 words – full of fascinating, surprising and at times unbelievable stories of how and why the items in your makeup bag got to be there. I also spent a long time sourcing the right images – beautiful paintings, illustrations and iconic photography – to tell the story.”

Lisa’s blog
Lisa’s book
Lisa’s YouTube channel
Lisa’s Instagram page

5 Tips For Healthy + Glowy Skin

Following the post about K-beauty & skincare, I was inspired to write about tips for healthy and glowy skin. Following are my top 5 tips that should be added to the typical “drink more water & exercise” that we hear day in and day out.

  • Double-cleanse – to effectively break down all of the makeup layers that we wear, it’s important to remove the makeup first with proper removers, micellar waters, etc. followed by two cleansers (can be the same or different products). The first cleanse gets rid of makeup removers’ residue on the skin, while the second layer penetrates the skin more effectively.
  • Exfoliate – whether physical or chemical, exfoliants get rid of the dry skin layer and increase cell turnover. This should be done no more than twice a week, especially for people with sensistive or acne-prone skin. I have normal/combination/sensitive skin and I use exfoliants as needed, which is about once a week. For more information about chemical & physical exfoliants, check out my blog post:
  • Focus on your nighttime skincare routine – this is the longest period of time when the skin is able to replenish and recover, therefore make sure you’re using the most effective and beneficial products to wake up with better skin every day. Make sure to wash the nightime skincare off in the morning with a light cleanser and then apply daytime moisturizer.
  • Self-tan – this point can be controversial, but most of us enjoy the look of our skin when we have a tan on. It makes the skintone more even and gives a better feeling overall. This is especially beneficial for people who have quite thin, translucent skin, which shows veins a lot more. I recommend using products such as Jergens Tanning Lotion or Mousse, St. Tropez, or Loving Tan with a mitt, over tanning salons or prolonged exposure to the sun.
  • Highlight using facial oils – place a drop or two of a facial oil on the back of your hand, swirl it around and dab it with a finger onto the cheekbones and around the brows to give a healthy, glow-from-within appearance. Make sure to use an oil that will not disrupt the foundation underneath, such as the Moroccan Oil Pure Argan Oil.

Tips For New Makeup Artists

  • Hand placement – never place your hand on top of a client’s head while working on their face, put it on your hip, hold another brush in it, or place it on the client’s chin. This is especially important with brides or models who have their hair already done. Plus, we tend to focus a lot on the step we’re doing that we might not notice just how hard our grip is on the client’s head.
  • Your pinky finger is your best friend – it serves as a resting point for your hand while blending eyeshadow or applying eyeliner, lipliner and lipstick. It’s a balancing tool to be used instead of resting the side of your hand on the face, or hold their head.
  • Apply false lashes easily – have the client look down and to the right for their right eye, and down to the left for their left eye. This method stretches the inside corner of the client’s eyelid allowing for perfect placement of false lashes and eyeliner.
  • Use dense eyeshadow applicators for glitters/pigments – you know those cheap ones that come with palettes? They’re so dense and impactful, they’ll be able to apply the glitter/pigment with less fallout and product loss than a traditional brush.
  • Choose the right eyeshadow transition shade – this shade is placed slightly above the socket of the eye under the browbone to transition into an eyeshadow look. The best bet is to use the bronzer shade you’re using on the client. This allows for cohesiveness and sculpting.
  • Avoid and correct eyeshadow fallout – it’s recommended to do eyeshadow first and wipe off the fallout without disrupting the base makeup. Apply skincare and primer, followed by eyeshadow. Clean up the fallout by wiping it off with a cotton round with some skincare on it – that way you’re not wiping off the initial skincare.
  • Apply skincare & primers strategically – skincare should help balance out dry/oily areas while helping to prolong the wear of makeup. Many people have oily T-zones (forehead, nose, and chin) while having dryness on the cheeks. Use hydrating, mattifying, and smoothing primers in areas where they’re needed. One primer may be all that the client needs, but may be not.

Skincare Mistakes to Avoid

  • Please seek expert advise from a dermatologist or a skincare expert if you feel conflicted with all of the different product reviews, or have specific skin needs/concerns.
  • Give a new product enough time to see results – sometimes it might take from 1-3 months to see the results of a new product in your skincare routine.

    Cleanser – should see results immediately – up to 4 weeks, pay attention to skin texture and moisture levels.

    Toner – should see results immediately – 2/3 weeks, pay attention to skin texture and hydration benefits.

    Serums – should see results in 3-5 weeks if it’s a hydrating/anti-aging product, 2-3 months if it’s a skin brightening/hyperpigmentation product, 1-3 months if it’s an acne-targeted but not prescription product.

    Eye creams & Sunscreens – should see and feel immediate results. Pay attention to improvements in fine lines and texture.
  • Don’t overuse physical exfoliants – rubbing in the beads can cause irritation and skin sensitivity, make sure you’re gently gliding the product over your skin or use a chemical exfoliator on a cotton round instead.
  • Don’t remove clay masks with a cloth – the skin will look red and feel irritated when removing a dried-out clay mask. Instead, keep removing it with water until it’s gone.
  • Rinse off the micellar water – especially cheaper products are formulated in a way that can cause dryness and clog pores. Also, make sure the micellar water is not your only makeup-removing step.
  • Don’t rely on popular skincare websites to check skincare product ingredients – they’re not a trustworthy source, they list all of the ingredients and give them a rating. But we have to look at the formulation as a whole with dominant and recessive percentages, “it’s the dose that makes the poison” (referring to alcohol in products being seen as a drying agent). Also, the ingridients are mostly uploaded by users, not companies, which can be misleading.
  • You might not need to use a specific product at all – understand what all active ingredients are doing for your skin and whether you need it or not. Figure out what you need for your personal skin concerns and benefits you want to see.
  • Remember that skincare can only do so much – don’t rely on skincare alone to fix your concerns, take into account your diet, exercise, water intake, genetic conditions, and always seek professional help if you feel the need to.

Video referenced

5 Beauty Tips That Make A Big Difference

1. Shave your face – removing peach fuzz allows for a smoother application of foundation and other products; it also gets rid of rough texture and dead skin cells, leaving the skin feeling renewed. Hold the skin with your fingers and genly, in short strokes, shave in the same direction as the hair grows. Follow up with a facial oil or a moisturizer for optimal results!

Get facial razors at Sephora or Amazon.

2. Apply concealer before foundation – it helps you avoid applying excessive amount of foundation because you’ve covered your major problem areas with a full coverage concealer; overall it gives a more lightweight result.

3. Moisturizer with foundation? – place some moisturizer on the back of your hand, stipple the brush in it, then apply your foundation with that brush; it sheers out the foundation for a lightweight finish and helps it blend in with your skin.

4. Matching blush tones – use the same product on your eyes, lips and cheeks to create a cohesive look. It’s quick and easy! Apply a cream blush color on your cheeks with a brush or fingers, then do the same on the eyes in the crease and lips. It provides a monotone look, both cream and powder products work for this trick.

Get multitasking plush products from MILK Makeup or Nudestix.

5. Cut your hair every 6 weeks – it provides the perfect timeframe to chop off the dead ends and leave the hair looking strong and healthy.

Do you have any tips and tricks you use regularly? Let me know in the comments below!

Is Mario Badescu On Steroids?

The plainly packaged line markets itself as a “botanical” brand by an unseen facialist from Romania who founded the company in 1967. It’s sold in popular stores like Urban Outfitters and Anthropologie and has managed to get a fair share of celebrity and social media endorsements over the years.

The Issue:

But “disappointed” customers is an understatement. The number of people who reported feelings of dry, itchy, red, irritated, and broken out skin after using Mario Badescu products is significant enough to constitute a trend. Considering this is a brand claiming to use only “simple, gentle, fresh-botanical-based ingredients,” it’s even more intriguing to dive into.

Mario Badescu has been hit with legal repercussions for the excruciating, disfiguring results of some of its formulations. In 2013, the brand settled a class action lawsuit brought against it for failing to disclose the inclusion of strong steroids in at least two of their products. The steroids, hydrocrotisone and triamcinolone acetonide, can trigger enlarged capillaries and dermatological misery, including skin atrophy. This is where the skin becomes so thin that it easily perforates, leading to infection, diseases, fungal growths, rashes and blistered skin that oozes, burns and peels. Of course, this looks as awful as it sounds. Worse, skin atrophy can cause problems with other medical issues; even removing a bandage can rip open the afflicted skin.

Should You Try Their Products Now?

According to beauty guru and self-proclaimed Cosmetics Cop Paula Begoun, the answer is no. Out of the 60 Mario Badescu products her team reviewed for Beautypedia.com, 55 achieve only one or two stars out of five. Five nabbed three stars, but none made it to four. Phrases like “incredibly irritating” and “no-go” are found all over in the detailed reviews.

More worrying, Begoun’s team found inaccurate assertions about product formulations. “This does not contain any type of AHA, as claimed,” Beautypedia notes of the brand’s Kiwi Face Scrub. Her examiners were scathing in their audit of Mario Badescu Glycolic Skin Renewal Complex, saying: “Lubragel CG on the ingredient list is a trade name for the film-forming agent glyceryl polymethacrylate (think hairspray)…Why does Badescu ignore FDA and European ingredient regulations? Perhaps he’s ashamed of his formulas?”

Packaging Issue:

The products are not the brand’s only problem. As noted by Hirons and other industry players, Mario Badescu doesn’t seem to invest many pennies in user-friendly packaging. Meanwhile many cult brands prove you can deliver superb skincare in protective, functional packaging that is both streamlined and easy for customers to use (think PIXI). Mario Badescu’s approach seems to be taking the highest possible margins for poor products contained in the flimsiest, cheapest vessels available.

Overall, always make sure to read labels, evaluate claims, and do at least a cursory Google search before investing in any brand.

References
Lawsuit Filed Against Mario Badescu Skincare Product Line
Is Mario Badescu Destroying Your Skin? You’re Not Alone

Skincare Techniques I Wish I Learned Sooner

  1. Don’t over cleanse – depending on your skin type and needs, one cleanse in the morning and one before bed (followed by moisturizer and serums, respectively) is enough. When you use more than one cleanser, they can strip the skin of moisture and have an opposite effect.
  2. Retinol, Vitamin C, etc in cleansers are just a marketing ploy – these ingredients should be in the leave-on treatments (such as moisturizers and serums), because you won’t get any benefits from it if the cleanser is on your skin for ten seconds.
  3. Don’t overcomplicate your skincare routine – be especially careful with AHAs and BHAs in exfoliants and toners, there IS such a thing as too much when it comes to skincare routines, sometimes the simpler and the less products – the better and more effective.
  4. Oils don’t moisturize – they soften up the top layer of the skin, but they can’t pull the moisture into the skin (you need a humectant to do that), so the oil should never count as your moisturizer. It’s a nice last step in a skincare routine to lock everything in and make the skin nice and soft, though.
  5. Use humectants on damp skin – they’re pulling the moisture into your skin, for example hyaluronic acid: it looks for moisture to pull into the malleable skin, so if the skin or the environment are dry, it’s going to reach into the lower layers of the skin to pull the moisture out of there and dehydrate your skin. When the skin is damp, apply the humectant, followed by moisturizer and a serum for best results.

8 Historical Makeup & Beauty Products That Still Exist Today

  1. L’Oreal’s True Match Foundation (since 1994) – the first of its kind to match 40 different complexions that also adapted to your unique undertone.
  2. Maybelline’s Great Lash Mascara – the packaging hasn’t even changed that much since 1971, but popularized in the 80s. It was the first water-based mascara, making it much easier to remove and having a faster drying time after initial application; it’s also free of chemicals and oils to avoid irritation.
  3. Revlon’s “Cherries In the Snow” Lipstick (since 1950s) – it’s a blue-based red, making it universally flattering on many different complexions, but depending on your skin undertone it may pull a bit more raspberry or true red.
  4. Carmex Original Lip Balm (since 1937) – one of the best tried-and-true products to bring the chapped/dehydrated lips back to life overnight. The first jar of Carmex sold for $0.29!
  5. Coty Air Spun Transluscent Powder (since 1935) – gives the skin an airbrushed, flawless finish, while having a neutral undertone (which is hard to find still to this day). The first Coty Air Spun Powder box was introduced in 1925, and it was revolutionary because it was the first to be spun by air, giving it a finer texture and greater fluffiness. The only thing that repelled people from it was the scent, however, now they make an unscented version!
  6. Revlon’s “Cherries In the Snow” Nail Polish – in the past it was a trend among women to have their nails match their lip colour, so both products gained popularity simultaneously and are still sold today.
  7. Noxzema Skin Cream (since 1914) – it wasn’t marketed as a skin cleanser until the 1950s, when a company secretary realized how beautiful it made her skin look.
  8. Pond’s Cold Cream Cleanser (since 1846) – one of the oldest skincare products to exist today, it does a great job at removing makeup, leaving the skin very moisturized. The term “cold cream” comes from the cooling feeling it leaves on the skin.

Video referenced

Do Beauty Supplements Really Work?

There are 134 search results for “beauty supplements” on Sephora.com alone, I can’t even imagine what the growing number is these days besides just Sephora. Many of these companies take advantage of the fact that many peoples’ insecurities are based on thoughts that they don’t have clear skin, strong hair and nails, enough collagen, etc.

The descriptions are usually pretty similar across the board, the promise is:

“Formulated by doctors, these supplements help nourish, firm, brighten the skin, while combatting visible signs of aging like fine lines and pigmentation…” you get the drift.

In reality though, mostly all of them are NOT made by doctors (in fact doctors recommend against them), and the high price tag (leading you to believe that you’re getting wonderful ingredients that’ll work right away) is simply a rip-off! For example, Algenist is advertising their Chlorella and Spirulina lines at $65 for a small amount, when you can get these ingredients in a grocery store. And sure, they might mention that their is “ethically sourced” or some big claim that there is no way for you to verify.

Sure, some people claim to notice a difference, but more often than not, the difference is very minimal, like softer skin, brighter complexion, and thicker eyebrows, which can be achieved through a proper diet and a skincare routine anyway!

A huge factor to note is the Placebo Effect – when you believe you’re in fact getting those benefits, you’ll convince yourself that the supplement is working, and in turn keep repurchasing it. It only adds to the problem when the shape of the vitamins is a cute gummy bear, or an extremely-sugary pill.

Collagen supplements are one of the most popular ones: collagen is in everything nowadays, even topically applied collagen has made its way into the market. However, there’s still no research the supports the fact that ingesting or applying collagen to your face or body does anything. The only studied support for external collagen applies to any treatments you might be getting (laser, etc) and engaging collagen with it while the skin is repairing, but that’s it.

Not to mention that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) doesn’t regulate supplements the way it does drugs. So you never really know what you’re getting when you buy one of these products.

Granted, actual pharmacy vitamins, such as Calcium, Vitamin D, B, etc. can be helpful for individuals who lack the proper amounts of these in their systems and have been recommended by a doctor.

Beauty supplements are only a fraction of the supergiant supplement industry that also includes detox teas and dietary supplements, join pain relief, inflammation, redness, etc. Be on the lookout and be smarter than the constant promotional messages telling you “it’s the best thing for (your problem)”. Sometimes you don’t even think that you have that problem, until you’re being advertsised to and convinced of it!

References:
Video referenced
Everyday Health article
Huffington Post article
FDA website